Nonfiction November: My Year 2017 in Nonfiction

NonfictionNovember-2017

#NonficNov

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule

As every year, a bunch of really cool bloggers are co-hosting Nonfiction November.
Here is the topic for week 1:

Your Year in Nonfiction:

Take a look back at your year of nonfiction and reflect on the following questions:
What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?
What nonfiction book have you recommended the most?
What is one topic or type of nonfiction you haven’t read enough of yet?
What are you hoping to get out of participating in Nonfiction November?

First of all, here is the recap of the nonfiction I have read (the links will send you to my review when it’s posted):

Biographies:

  1. A Forger’s Life, by Sarah Kaminsky
  2. Born a Crime, by Trevor Noah
  3. Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days, by Will Bashor
  4. Manderley Forever, by Tatiana de Rosnay
  5. The Madeleine Project, by Clara Beaudoux
  6. Bonjour Kale, by Kristen Beddard
  7. Audubon, on the Wings of the World, by Fabien Grolleau
  8. A Prodigal Saint: Father John of Kronstadt and the Russian People, by Nadieszda Kizenko

About books:

  1. The World Between Two Covers, by Ann Morgan
  2. The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of les Misérables, by David Bellos

About nature:

Unseen City, by Nathanael Johnson

Orthodox spirituality:

  1. Amour Sans Limites, by Lev Gillet
  2. To Open One’s Heart, by Michel Evdokimov
  3. The Typikon Decoded, by Job Gretcha
  4. The River of Fire, by Alexandre Kalomiros
  5. Le Regard du Ressuscité, by Archimandrite Gabriel

16 books so far.
By the end of the year, I also plan to read or finish reading:

  1. A Taste of Paris, by David Downie
  2. Man of God: Saint John of Shanghai & San Francisco, by Peter Prekrestov
  3. The Sherlock Holmes Book (Big Ideas Simply Explained), by DK Publishing
  4. A Curious Collection of Dates: Through the Year with Sherlock Holmes, by Leah Guinn, Jaime N. Mahoney
  5. Chronicles of a Liquid Society, by Umberto Eco

    What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?

The World Between Two Covers    The Novel of the Century

Click on the covers to read my detailed reviews
I had to pick 2 titles!

What nonfiction book have you recommended the most?

      Manderley

Plus of course the top 2

What is one topic or type of nonfiction
you haven’t read enough of yet?

As usual, current issues!

What are you hoping to get out
of participating in Nonfiction November?

Get acquainted with more nonfiction readers and good titles unknown to me.

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE NONFICTION THIS YEAR?

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2017: February wrap-up

February 2017 wrap-up

Huh, the month of February is already over!
Hurray, Spring is closer, actually Summer is even here some days in Chicago, and then next day we are back to Winter. The poor summer birds that decided to come back so early must be totally confused.

It was another very good month of reading, but I’m already getting late on several reviews… nothing new under the sun!

Here is what I read in February:

10  books:
7 in print
with 1,928 pages, that is: 68 pages/day
+ 3 audiobooks
with 16H43, that is: 35 mn/day

3 in literary fiction:

  1. Le Principe, by Jérôme Ferrari – ebook
  2. Gustave Flaubert: The Ambiguity of Imagination, by Guiseppe Cafiero
  3. Till We Have Faces, by C.S. Lewis

3 in mystery:

  1. A Study in Scarlet, by Arthur Conan Doyle – audiobook
  2. Trois jours et une vie, by Pierre Lemaitre – audiobook
  3. The Sign of Four, by Arthur Conan Doyle – audiobook

2 in nonfiction:

  1. A Forger’s Life, by Sarah Kaminsky
  2. Born a Crime, by Trevor Noah

2 in historical fiction:

  1. The Muralist, by B. A. Shapiro – ebook
  2. Highland Storm, by Tanya Anne Crosby – ebook that I translated into French

 

My favorites in February

          a-forgers-life   trois-jours et une vie audio

 Reading Challenges recap

Classics Club: 18/50 (until end of 2018)
Back to the Classics Challenge: 4/12
Mount TBR: 10/48
Where Are You Reading?: 21/50 – to be finished in ??

Total of books read in 2017 = 22/100

Number of books added to my TBR in February = 15

Blog recap

Most popular book review in February

The Tree of Man

click on the cover to access my review.

Most popular post last month
– non book review –

The top 11 books to read in February

Book blog that brought me
most traffic this past month

The Classics Club

please go visit

Top commenters of the month

Inspired by Becca at I’m Lost in Books!
and her Blogger Shout-Outs feature

= 1 point per month for the top 3.
The one who has the most points at the end of the year will receive a gift!
NB: just congratulating winners of giveaways does not count as a real comment 😉

2: Karen at Booker Talk

2: Lucy at The Fictional 100 

2: Kristyn at Reading to Unwind

Blog milestones

1,576 posts
over 4,090 subscribers
over 130,00 hits

Plans for March

  • Humming along with The Complete of Sherlock Holmes on audio.
    I’m reading them in chronological order of publication, and planning to watch a movie of each as well.
    I’m counting as separate books the novels, but the short stories as a collection.
    So I listened so far to the first two novels, A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four, and I have started the first collection of short stories: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. I chose Simon Prebble as the narrator for all of these, he is so good
  • I may do something for Travel the World in Books Reading Challenge, this time it’s on North Africa

 

Come back on Friday
to see what I plan to read in March!

Eiffel Tower OrangeEiffel Tower OrangeEiffel Tower Orange

How was YOUR month of  February?

Month in Review

Kathryn at The Book Date
has created a Month In Review meme
I’ll now be linking my monthly recap posts
Thanks Kathryn, great idea!

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Born a Crime 9-14: read-along at Book Bloggers International

born-a-crime

Born a Crime:
chapters 9-14
read-along at
Book Bloggers International

This book is so good, I’m surprised not more bloggers have joined the read-along

So here are the questions proposed today on the chapters 9-14 of the book, with my answers:

1. This past week was Valentine’s Day, and appropriately Part II features not one, not two, but three stories from Noah’s tragic misadventures in romance. Which one of these was your favorite? Which the saddest? Did they remind you of any of your own teenage heartbreaks? Juicy details pls

Sorry I didn’t take too many notes on that, I found all these stories rather sad. And I’m not your best candidate for that type of story. I spent my teenage years in studies and books, no time for dating.

2. In Chapter 9, “The Mulberry Tree,” Noah says that’s it’s easier to be an outsider trying to fit in than an insider who doesn’t. Do you think this is true? How do you think that experience shaped how Noah related to the world going forward? How did you react to the actions of Abel?

I actually had a hard time understanding really what he meant by that sentence, I reread it in the context several times, in vain. I would appreciate if you could tell me how you understand this passage.

3. Trevor Noah: entrepreneur or hustler?

Aren’t the two words synonyms, lol? I think he was probably a bit of both, which made sense for a smart kid who had finally found a way to survive and makes the best of a tough situation. And anyway, he was racketing anyone, he was using the greed of the other kids for his own interest, using the only strengths he had, his speed and his idea to come up with that idea.

4. One of the most tragi-comic stories in the section, I think, is Chapter 13, “Colorblind.” What were some of your reactions to the story? Noah never tells us what happens to his friend–why do you think that is??

It actually did not surprise me on the side of the justice: we often only see what we want to see, and we automatically block what we do not want to see.
And on Noah’s part, he may have shut up about it for the sake of his mother.
Why he never tells us about his friend: maybe because deep down he still feels guilty about it?

5. Anything else you found interesting or want to discuss?

– What amazed me in chapter 9 was how arbitrary the apartheid classifications could be, how for instance, for a reason or another, you could be reclassified as white, or vice versa! And how the system built enmity between the groups:

That’s what apartheid did: it convinced every group that it was because of the other race that they didn’t get into the club.
p.120

– Behind Trevor’s humor and sharpness, it’s very sad to feel deeper his inner solitude in these chapters.
I wonder if the fact of never having felt by any group white, black, colored, was the ultimate reason why he left his country.

Eiffel Tower Orange

If you want to see my comments on the other chapters, please check:

 

#12mos12rals

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