2022 books in translation reading challenge

 

Books-Translation-Challenge-2022

Click on the banner to join this reading challenge

#2022booksintranslation

The Challenge is organized by
@IntrovertReader (Twitter)
@Introverted.Reader (Instagram)
@IntrovertedReader (Facebook)

I love literature in translation, and read 52 books for this challenge in 2021, so this is not really a challenge. I’m joining more for the social aspect and connecting with other readers of world literature.
So am shooting for the Linguist Level = 10+, the highest level.
I will be updating the list here as I go along.
I start the year with the Japanese Literature Challenge, so by the end of March, I should already have read 12 books in translation.

The links will send you to my review

  1. Red is my Heart, by Antoine Laurain (tr. from the French by Jane Aitken)
  2. The Three-Body Problem, by Cixin Liu (tr. from the Chinese by Ken Liu)
  3. The Wild Geese, by Ogai Mori (tr. from the Japanese by Sanford Goldstein & Kingo Ochiai 
  4. How Do You Live?, by Yoshino Genzaburo (tr. from the Japanese by Bruno Navasky)
  5. Dōjōji, by Yukio Mishima (tr. from Japanese into French by Dominique Aury)
  6.  

TOTAL = 5

Recap of languages translated from:
Japanese : 3
French: 1
Chinese: 1

 

2021 books in translation reading challenge

Books-in-Translation-2021

Click on the banner to join this reading challenge

#2021booksintranslation

The Challenge is organized by
@IntrovertReader (Twitter)
@Introverted.Reader (Instagram)
@IntrovertedReader (Facebook)

I haven’t participated in this challenge for several years.
So far, as I prepare this post, I have read 17 books in translation in 2020 (plus 28 books in French), so this is not really a challenge. I’m joining more for the social aspect and connecting with other readers of world literature.
So am shooting for the Linguist Level = 10+, I wish there were a higher level.
SO I HAVE ACTUALLY DECIDED TO CHALLENGE MYSELF TO 20 BOOKS

I will be updating the list here as I go along.
I start the year with the Japanese Literature Challenge, so by the end of March, I should already have read 9 books in translation.

The links will send you to my review

  1. The Book of Psalms
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 1/6/21
  2. The Sound of Waves, by Yukio Mishima
    translated from the Japanese
    by Meredith Weatherby
    finished on 1/16/21
  3. Some Prefer Nettles, by Junichiro Tanizaki
    translated from the Japanese
    by Edward G. Seidensticker
    finished on 1/22/21
  4. The Book of Job
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 1/23/21
  5. N.P., by Banana Yoshimoto
    translated from the Japanese
    by Ann Sherif
    finished on 1/25/2021
  6. In Praise of Shadows, by Junichiro Tanizaki
    translated from the Japanese
    by Edward G. Seidensticker
    and Thomas J. Harper
    finished on 2/4/21
  7. The Book of Proverbs
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 2/8/21
  8.  A Cat, a Man, and Two Women, by Junichirō Tanizaki
    translated from the Japanese by Paul McCarthy
    finished on 2/9/21
  9. The Half-Finished Heavenby Tomas Tranströmer
    translated from the Swedish
    by Robert Bly
    finished on 2/13/21
  10. Dans l’œil du démon / Devils in Daylight, by Junichirō Tanizaki
    translated from the Japanese into French by Patrick Honoré and Ryoko Sekiguchi
    finished on 2/13/21
  11. The Book of Ecclesiastes
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 2/27/21
  12. The Book of the Song of Songs
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 3/1/21
  13. The Book of Wisdom
    translated from the Greek
    audiobook finished on 3/1/21
  14. Kusamakura, by Natsume Sōseki
    translated from the Japanese. by Meredith Weatherby
    finished on 3/5/21
  15. The Book of Sirach
    translated from the Greek
    audiobook finished on 3/8/21
  16. The Book of Hosea
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 3/13/21
  17. The Book of Amos
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 3/13/21
  18. Le Mineur, by Natsume Sōseki
    translated from the Japanese into French by Hélène Morita
    finished on 3/20/21
  19. Before the Coffee Gets Cold, by Toshikazu Kawaguchi
    translated from the Japanese by Geoffrey Trousselot
    finished on 3/21/21
  20. To the Spring Equinox and Beyond, by Natsume Sōseki
    translated from the Japanese by Kingo Ochiai and Sanford M. Goldstein
    finished on 3/29/21
  21. The Black Lizard and Beast in the Shadowsby Edogawa Rampo
    translated from the Japanese by Ian Hughes
    finished on 3/30/21
  22. The Book of Micah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/4/21
  23. The Book of Joel
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/4/21
  24. The Book of Obadiah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/4/21
  25. The Book of Jonah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/4/21
  26. The Book of Nahum
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/5/21
  27. The Book of Habakkuk
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/5/21
  28. The Book of Zephaniah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/5/21
  29. The Book of Haggai
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 4/5/21
  30. The Swedish Cavalier, by Leo Perutz
    translated from the German by John Brownjohn
    finished on 4/6/21
  31. The Old Capital, by Yasunari Kawabata
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 4/22/21
  32. First Person Singular, by Haruki Murakami,
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 4/28/21
  33. The Book of Zechariah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 5/10/21
  34. The Book of Malachi
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 5/10/21
  35. The Book of Isaiah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 5/13/21
  36. People Like Them, by Samira Sedira
    translated from the French
    finished on 5/16/21
  37. The Book of Jeremiah
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 5/24/21
  38. Flight of the Raven, by Jean-Pierre Gibrat
    translated from the French
    finished on 5/31/21
  39. The Book of Baruch
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 6/11/21
  40. The Book of Lamentations
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 6/12/21
  41. The Book of Ezekiel
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 6/24/21
  42. The Book of Daniel
    translated from the Hebrew
    audiobook finished on 6/26/21
  43. The Apothecary Diaries, vol 1, by Natsu Hyuuga
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 6/30/21
  44. Cats of the Louvre, by Taiyo Matsumoto
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 7/6/21
  45. The Apothecary Diaries, vol 2, by Natsu Hyuuga
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 7/17/21
  46. Midaq Alley, by Naguib Mahfouz
    translated from the Arabic
    finished on 7/17/21
  47. Le Village aux Huit Tombes, by Seishi Yokomizo
    translated from the Japanese (into French)
    finished on 8/30/21
  48. Rider on the Rain, by Sébastien Japrisot
    translated from the French
    finished on 9/4/21
  49. The New Testament, by David Bentley Hart
    translated from the Greek
    finished on 10/27/21
  50. The Invention of Morel, by Adolfo Bioy Casares
    translated from the Spanish
    finished on 11/9/21
  51. Murakami T: The T-Shirts I Love, by Haruki Murakami
    translated from the Japanese
    finished on 11/29/21
  52. Ficciones, by Jorge Luis Borges
    translated from the Spanish
    finished on 12/16/21

TOTAL = 52.
This is about the regular amount of translated books I read every year.
Though it’s only 39% of all the books I have read this year. In 2020, translated fiction was 50% of all the books I read.

To that, you could add 32 books in French actually.

Recap of languages translated from:
Arabic: 1
French: 3
German: 1
Greek: 3
Hebrew: 23
Japanese: 18
Spanish: 2
Swedish: 1
So from 8 different languages, same number as in 2020

 

Armchair Book Expo Day 3: Diversity & Dining With Authors

Armchair Book Expo

Armchair Book Expo Day 3:

Diversity & Dining With Authors

Delving Into Diversity: Book Expo sparked quite the controversy a couple years ago regarding diversity in books and authors. Where are we now? OR, let’s take a different direction and explore the diversity of the format of a book. Do we judge a book by its cover and/or content (e.g.,, audio, digital, graphic, etc.)? Or, combine the two topics and discuss diversity found in alternative content (e.g., representation in graphic novels). Get creative and maybe even controversial!

Diversity in books is very important for me. I think it makes reading even more of an adventure if you open yourselves to different formats and contents.

Diversity in format:

Personally I am always in the process of reading (at least) 1 book in print + 1 digital + listening to 1 audiobook. And occasionally reading a graphic novel – I have not tried yet graphic novels in digital format though.
Print or digital? I have tons of print books on my shelves to read, plus the ones I check out at my library. And some I receive from publishers.
And I like having digital copies to read, for instance to take with me when I go somewhere. Or when I know I will have only a few minutes available – it’s easier to follow where I am at on a screen. I also have a lot of ebooks on my TBR, so I’m trying to go through them as well, and Netgalley and Edeweiss have always great offers I can’t refuse…
And audiobooks is a must for me: I grab it as soon as I do something around the house: dusting, washing the dishes (get rid of your dishwasher, you will have great time washing and listening to books!), ironing, gardening, and painting when I have time for art.
With that only, I manage to listen to 1 to 2 books every month.
I just can’t sit and listen. If I sit, then I grab a print/digital book.

Diversity in content:

I try to read many genres, though there are some I have to stay away from, as I can be very sensitive to what I read. So for my health of mind, I’ll stay away from a  few genres.
Right now for me, diversity means also being more attentive and open to foreign literature, and not just French! And it looks like finally American presses are also opening up in that field. It’s about time!
I thought I was doing quite well in that perspective, when last Sunday I got a good humble reminder that I still had ways to go…
A friend of mine shared the book she was reading. It had received the Russian Booker prize. Well, I didn’t even know there was a Russian Booker Prize! I love Russia, and I have recently read a few books translated from the Russian, but when I went to look at that award, I discovered to my horror that I didn’t know ANY of all the authors who won that award along the years!

Dining With the Authors: Every year at Book Expo, children and adult authors are featured during breakfast. Who would you dream of enjoying a meal with? Would it be breakfast, lunch, dinner, or simply coffee? What would your meal be? What would you discuss?

I answered on Instagram – I think you need to be on Instagram to see.
If you are not on Instagram, who do you think I chose??
I would probably don’t get answers, lol, but I would ask him questions about the sources of his incredible imagination.

HOW IMPORTANT IS DIVERSITY
IN BOOKS FOR YOU?

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