Japanese Literature Challenge 15

JAPANESE LITERATURE CHALLENGE 15

Japanese Literature Challenge 15

#JapaneseLitChallenge15   #JapaneseLiterature

Thanks to DolceBelleza (@bellezzamjs) who has been organizing this challenge for many years! This is my 7th participation.
Click on the logo to read more about it, to join us, and to read reviews as they will be posted.

The Challenge runs January-March 2022. I’m going to try to read 4 books each month, so that’s a total of 12 books.

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Here is my TBR (in chronological order) for this event – my recap, with links to my reviews, will be updated at the end of this post:

📚 For the Classics Club:

  1. The Wild Geese (1911), by Ogai Mori (trans. by Sanford Goldstein and Kingo Ochiai)
  2. How Do You Live? (1937), by Genzaburo Yoshino (trans. by Bruno Navasky)
  3. Dōjōji (1957), by Yukio Mishima (not sure yet for the translator, will specify later when I read it)
  4. The Waiting Years (1957), by Fumiko Enchi (trans. by John Bester)
  5. Star (1961), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Sam Bett)
  6. Les Dimanches De Monsieur Ushioda (1970), by Yasushi Inoue (not sure yet for the translator, will specify later when I read it). I don’t think it has been translated into English. Let me know
  7. The Box Man (1973), by Kōbō Abe (trans. by E. Dale Saunders )
  8. The Year of My Life (1973), by Kobayashi Issa (trans. by Nobuyuki Yuasa)
  9. When I Whistle (1974), by Shūsaku Endō (trans. by Van C. Gessel)

📚 More recent:

10. The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (1981), by Sōji Shimada (trans. by Shika MacKenzie and Ross MacKenzie)
11. 
Murder in the Crooked House (1982), by Sōji Shimada (trans. by Louise Heal Kawai)
12.
Confessions (2008), by Kanae Minato (trans. by Stephen Snyder)

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RECAP FOR MARCH 31

So here are the books I managed to read – with one not on the above list!:

  1. The Wild Geese (1911), by Ogai Mori (trans. by Sanford Goldstein and Kingo Ochiai)
  2. How Do You Live? (1937), by Genzaburo Yoshino (trans. by Bruno Navasky)
  3. Dōjōji (1957), by Yukio Mishima (trans. into French by Dominique Aury)
  4. The Waiting Years (1957), by Fumiko Enchi (trans. into French by Anne Bayard-Sakai and Cécile Sakai)
  5. Star (1961), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Sam Bett)
  6. Les Dimanches De Monsieur Ushioda (1970), by Yasushi Inoue (trans. into French by Jean-François Laffont and Tadahiro Oku)
  7. The Box Man (1973), by Kōbō Abe (trans. by E. Dale Saunders)
  8. River of Stars: Selected Poems of Yosano Akiko (1878-1942). Trans. by Sam Hamill and Keiko Matsui Gibson (1996)

CLICK ON THE BEAUTIFUL LOGO TO JOIN!
WHICH BOOKS DO YOU FEEL LIKE READING?
WHICH ONES HAVE YOU ALREADY READ AND ENJOYED?

Book review: The Invention of Morel

The Invention of Morel

The Invention of Morel,
by Adolfo Bioy Casares
Translated from the Spanish
by Ruth L. C. Simms
NYRB
La invención de Morel
was first published in 1940
103 pages
Literary fiction / Classic

Goodreads

Buy the book on my Bookshop

Last month, I started rereading Ficciones, and realized I wanted to go deeper, but didn’t have time then to do so. So I am planning to go back to it in December.
In the meantime, this is November, with many book blogging events, for instance Novellas in November.
For the occasion, I decided to read a novella in translation that’s on my Classics Club list: The Invention of Morel. And I discovered in the excellent introduction by Suzanne Jill Levine (NYRB Classics edition) that its author, Adolfo Bioy Casares (1914-1999) was great friends with Jorge Luis Borges, who was also his mentor (and he wrote a prologue for this book). So I’m still in great company! Click to continue reading

Book review: The Sleeping Car Murders

The Sleeping Car Murders

The Sleeping Car Murders,
by Sébastien Japrisot
Translated by Francis Price
Gallic Books
US publication date 11/2/2021
Compartiment tueurs
was first published in French in 1962
208 pages
French mystery / Classic

Goodreads

Buy the book on my Bookshop

Last month, I shared with you my enthusiasm for a book by Sébastien Japrisot, Rider on the rain. After that one and Trap For Cinderella, I am thrilled to share a third one today: The Sleeping Car Murders Click to continue reading