Read or skip #7

READ OR SKIP

Inspired by book blogger Davida, at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog, herself inspired by a couple of other bloggers (see here for instance). I plan to post about it on Saturdays, except the 1st Sat of the month, when I usually feature another meme.

The rules are simple:

  1. Sort your Goodreads TBR shelf from oldest to new
  2. Pick the first 5 or 10 (or whatever number you choose, depending on how large your list is) books you see
  3. Decide whether to keep them or get rid of them.

RESULTS FOR PREVIOUS READ OR SKIP

read-or-skip 6

20, 21 and 23: skip
Read the others.

READ OR SKIP #7

read-or-skip-7

#readorskip

Let’s see what YOU think about these 8 titles today.

24) Sacré Bleu

  • This sounds like a mix of many things: humor (hmm, not sure about this), historical fiction, fantasy (hmm), mystery, and romance (hmm!)
  • BUT should I try this author?
    SKIP, unless you convince me otherwise

25) The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci

  • I think someone told me this was fantastic.
  • BUT the average Goodreads ratings is not high.
    READ?

26) The History of English spelling

  • The History of English Spelling reveals the history of Modern English spelling, tracing its origins and development from Old English up to the present day.” Totally my type of thing.
    READ

29) Language Myths and the History of English

  • Yes, I noticed the numbers are not in order, but that’s they are currently displayed on my Goodreads list. Weird.
  • The synopsis leaves me uninterested.
    SKIP

28) Varamo

  • Sounds like a great novella by Aira.
    READ

27) The Letter Killers Club

  • Classic Russian literature!
    READ

30) Barney’s Version

  • This one was highly recommended to me.
  • And I haven’t read many Canadian authors.
    READ

31) The Girl Who Leapt Through Time

  • “The Girl Who Leapt Through Time tells the story of Kazuko Yoshiyama, a third-year middle school student who accidentally acquires the ability to time travel after an unfortunate accident in a school science lab. “
  • Not sure I’ll like that, but it’s short, and an opportunity to discover another Japanese author.
    READ

What do YOU think? Should I skip more than two? What t do with #25?

HAVE YOU READ THESE?
READ OR SKIP?
I ALSO WELCOME SUGGESTIONS
FOR GOOD BOOKS ON SIMILAR THEMES

 

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TOP 3 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 06/23-24

TOP 3 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 

06/23-24/2012

Here are the latest titles added to my Goodreads TBR,
I suggest them as the top 3 books for your week-end.

FICTION

Run

The highly anticipated new novel from the bestselling author of “Bel Canto” is an engrossing story of a family on one fateful night in Boston during which their secrets are unlocked and new bonds are formed.
Hardcover, 304 pages
Published September 25th 2007 by Harper
ISBN0061340634 (ISBN13: 9780061340635)

Pale Fire

In Pale Fire, Nabokov offers a cornucopia of deceptive pleasures: a 999-line poem by the reclusive genius John Shade; an adoring foreword and commentary by Shade’s self-styled Boswell, Dr. Charles Kinbote; a darkly comic novel of suspense, literary idolatry, one-upmanship, and political intrigue.

“This centaur work, half poem, half prose…is a creation of perfect beauty, symmetry, strangeness, originality and moral truth. Pretending to be a curio, it cannot disguise the fact that it is one of the great works of art of this century.” — Mary McCarthy

Paperback, 272 pages
Published May 1st 2010 by Penguin Books, Limited (UK)(first published 1962)
ISBN0141185260 (ISBN13: 9780141185262)

The Letter Killers Club

by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, Joanne Turnbull (Translator), Caryl Emerson (Introduction)
Writers are professional killers of conceptions. The logic of the Letter Killers Club, a secret society of “conceivers” who commit nothing to paper on principle, is strict and uncompromising. Every Saturday they meet in a fire-lit room hung with blank black bookshelves to present their “pure and unsubstantiated” conceptions: a rehearsal of Hamlet hijacked by an actor who vanishes with the role; the double life of a medieval merry cleric derailed by a costume change; a machine-run world that imprisons men’s minds while conscripting their bodies; a dead Roman scribe stranded this side of the River Acheron. The overarching scene of this short novel is set in Soviet Moscow, in the ominous 1920s. Known only by pseudonym, like Chesterton’s anarchists in fin-de-siècle London, the Letter Killers are as mistrustful of one another as they are mesmerized by their despotic president. Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky is at his philosophical and fantastical best in this extended meditation on madness and silence, the word and the soul unbound.
Paperback, 123 pages
Published December 6th 2011 by NYRB Classics(first published 1976)
ISBN159017450X (ISBN13: 9781590174500)
HAVE YOU EVER READ ANY OF THESE?
ANY OTHER GOOD READING PLAN
FOR YOU THIS WEEK-END?