Book review: The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar – I love France #110

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The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar

The Ashes of Heaven's Pillar

In full compliance with FTC Guidelines,
I received this ebook for free
in exchange
for a fair and honest review.
I was in no way compensated
for this post as a reviewer,
and the thoughts are my own.
The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar
by
Kim Rendfeld
Publisher: Fireship Press
Release Date: August 28, 2014

 

ISBN:  978-1611793062
Pages: 396

Genre:
Historical Fiction 

Source: Received
from the publisher for a
virtual book tour

Goodreads

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This book counts for the following Reading Challenges:

      books-on-france-14    2014 historical fiction    2014 Ebook-2

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

new eiffel 5

For once, let me tell you about some personal background here.
I discovered Kim Rendfeld three years ago and wrote a review of The Cross And The Dragon. So last April when I was approached by Fireship Press to review her latest book, I said yes right away, not really bothering to read the synopsis: as I wrote recently about Murakami, with some authors I like very much, I actually prefer to jump into the book knowing nothing about it.

You may remember that in March, I had completed my translation of a long historical novel into French, Orgueil et honneur, by Nathaniel Burns. It was a fascinating book on Widukind and Charlemagne and the key battles between the Saxons and the Franks. I enjoyed a lot the book and doing the translation, even though the publisher has yet to send me one cent for my hard work –more about that another time!
So what a happy surprise when I finally got to start reading Kim’s novel, The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar, and discovered there Widukind, Father Sturm and other characters I had been so close to while translating Burns’ book! I am still shocked I was intrigued by the title and never thought for a second it was referring to the famous Irminsul!! The Irminsul was the sacred tree maybe, site for sure, for the Saxons and their pagan religion. Led by Charlemagne, the Franks destroyed it in 772.
Set on this background, Kim presents us the life of a Saxon family, their hardships and how they ended up living in Francia.
Click to continue reading

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November deal: The Burning Land, by Bernard Cornwell

The Burning Land

I enjoy a lot the Saxon Stories Series

by Bernard CORNWELL

The Burning Land

is #5

Author’s website | Goodreads | My review

Great deal for it in November!

My review #46: The Burning Land

The Burning Land

(Saxon Chronicles #5)

by

Bernard CORNWELL

336 pages

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

Every good thing has an end… I just finished the 5th volume of the Saxon Chronicles, and will have to wait until the 6th is published!
I really enjoyed a lot the whole series, even though some war details were sometimes a bit too bloody. But the characters are fantastically described, especially the hero Uhtred. His inner wrestling between his love for the Danes, who raised him, and Alfred, king of Wessex, the last area not yet completely dominated by the Danes, is almost as violent as the blows he gives with is fierce sword.

Interestingly, though Alfred descendants managed to create a real England, free from the Danish domination, England and the English language are still full witness of the powerful presence of the Dnes back then; just think about the days of the week, Thursday being the most obvious, in honor of the god Thor. Alfred did try to rename the days of the week on the basis of his strong Christian faith, but it never took. And of course not mentioning so many place names. I enjoyed this cultural aspect I was remiinded in this book.

The author does a great job I believe describing the religious context of the time, with the mix of paganism, Christianity, the common criticisms against too rich and immoral clerics. Some readers have expressed their shocking reaction, but it is alas historically proven that many clerics of the times were very far from being saints.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT

The latest in the bestselling Alfred series from number one historical novelist, Bernard Cornwell. In the last years of the ninth century, King Alfred of Wessex is in failing health, and his heir is an untested youth. The Danes, who have failed so many times to conquer Wessex, smell opportunity! First comes Harald Bloodhair, a savage warrior leading a Viking horde, who is encouraged to cruelty by his woman, Skade. But Alfred still has the services of Uhtred, his unwilling warlord, who leads Harald into a trap and, at Farnham in Surrey, inflicts one of the greatest defeats the Vikings were ever to suffer. This novel, the fifth in the magnificent series of England’s history tells of the final assaults on Alfred’s Wessex, that Wessex survived to become England is because men like Uhtred defeated an enemy feared throughout Christendom. [Goodreads]

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Cornwell was born in London in 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force. He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. After he left them, he changed his name to his mother’s maiden name, Cornwell.

Cornwell was sent away to Monkton Combe School, attended the University of London, and after graduating, worked as a teacher. He attempted to enlist in the British armed services at least three times, but was rejected on the grounds of myopia.

He then joined BBC’s Nationwide and was promoted to become head of current affairs at BBC Northern Ireland. He then joined Thames Television as editor of Thames News. He relocated to the United States in 1980 after marrying an American. Unable to get a Green Card, he started writing novels, as this did not require a work permit.

As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C.S. Forester, chronicling the adventures of fictional British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars, and was surprised to find that there were no such novels following Lord Wellington’s campaign on land. Motivated by the need to support himself in the U.S. through writing, Cornwell decided to write such a series. He named his chief protagonist Richard Sharpe, a rifleman involved in most major battles of the Peninsular War.

Cornwell wanted to start the series with the Siege of Badajoz but decided instead to start with a couple of “warm-up” novels. These were Sharpe’s Eagle and Sharpe’s Gold, both published in 1981. Sharpe’s Eagle was picked up by a publisher, and Cornwell got a three-book deal. He went on to tell the story of Badajoz in his third Sharpe novel Sharpe’s Company published in 1982.

Cornwell and wife Judy co-wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym “Susannah Kells”. These were A Crowning Mercy, published in 1983, Fallen Angels in 1984, and Coat of Arms (aka The Aristocrats) in 1986. (Cornwell’s strict Protestant upbringing informed the background of A Crowning Mercy, which took place during the English Civil War.) He also published Redcoat, an American Revolutionary War novel set in Philadelphia during its 1777 occupation by the British, in 1987.

After publishing 8 books in his ongoing Sharpe series, Cornwell was approached by a production company interested in adapting them for television. The producers asked him to write a prequel to give them a starting point to the series. They also requested that the story feature a large role for Spanish characters to secure co-funding from Spain. The result was Sharpe’s Rifles, published in 1987 and a series of Sharpe television films staring Sean Bean.

A series of contemporary thrillers with sailing as a background and common themes followed: Wildtrack published in 1988, Sea Lord (aka Killer’s Wake) in 1989, Crackdown in 1990, Stormchild in 1991, and a political thriller called Scoundrel in 1992.

In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen’s 80th Birthday Honours List.

Cornwell’s latest work is titled Azincourt and was released in the UK in October 2008. The protagonist is an archer who participates in the Battle of Agincourt, another devastating defeat suffered by the French in the Hundred Years War. However Cornwell has stated that it will not be about Thomas of Hookton from The Grail Quest or any of his relatives. [Goodreads].

To know more about Bernard Cornwell and his work, there’s an excellent article on wikipedia, and great interviews and book trailers on his own website.

REVIEWS BY OTHERS

“Cornwell, a master of martial fiction, makes history come alive with his rousing battlefield scenes.” (Margaret Flanagan, Booklist )

“Cornwell (Agincourt) has been described as a master of historical fiction, but that may be an understatement. Cornwell makes his subject material come alive. Better, his major protagonist is totally believable and human.” (Robert Conroy, Library Journal )

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