The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #21

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#ccspin

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #20

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #21, I got #5, which in my list is

On the Edge of the World

It was written in 1875 by Nikolai Leskov:
Based on a true story of an early Russian missionary bishop’s trip to Eastern Siberia. During his journey he learns through example and suffering that in indigenous peoples of all cultures there is dignity that must be recognized and built upon as a foundation for Christian conversion.  (Goodreads)

I’m totally thrilled, as I am in a Russian mood – well, that’s not that unusual.
I’m glad I didn’t get one of my many Japanese titles, as I want to keep them for the Japanese Literature Challenge starting in January at Dolce Bellezza.

It’a very short work, and I have until end of October to read and review it.

Have you read it? What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

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Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spin:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

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HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT IS YOUR #?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

 

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Book review: The Goose Fritz

The Goose Fritz

The Goose Fritz
by Sergei Lebedev
Translated by
Antonina W. Bouis
New Vessel Press

March 19, 2019
Genre: Literary fiction
322 pages

Goodreads

Buy the book

Follow New Vessel Press on Twitter | on Facebook

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Having very much appreciated Oblivion, by Lebedev, I decided to read his latest novel, The Goose Fritz, which actually tackles some similar themes.

Click to continue reading

Book beginnings: Oblivion

Book Beginnings#BookBeginnings

Eiffel Tower Orange

 

Oblivion

I stand at the boundary of Europe. Here, every cliff above the ocean reveals the yellow bone of stone and the ocher-red soil, looking like flesh; the bone crumbles under the blows of the waves, the flesh of the soil devours the tide. The ocean is so vast that eyes cannot encompass it. Here, Europe ends; the shore recedes, as if the continent was drawing into itself.
book beginning

Oblivion,
by Sergei Lebedev

Publisher’s website

My review

 

Eiffel Tower Orange

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