Weekly Photo Challenge: Fleeting moment

The Weekly Photo Challenge this week is

Share a picture that captures a fleeting moment on the street!

I love that picture, taken in Paris, in the Quartier Latin:

people walking, people drinking at a café, an accordion player, clothes for sale, Molière!, a postcard vendor, and the omnipresent Vélib’!

DO YOU HAVE A PICTURE OF A FLEETING MOMENT ON THE STREET?


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or to post your own picture, please visit this page.

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I love France #18: Shakespeare And Company

I LOVE FRANCE!

I plan to publish this meme every Thursday.
You can share here about any book
or anything cultural you just discovered related to France, Paris, etc.

Please spread the news on Twitter, Facebook, etc !
Feel free to grab my button,
and link your own post through Mister Linky,
at the bottom of this post.

*******

Last week, I promised you more things from Le Quartier Latin in Paris.

There are of course several gorgeous gardens, such as Le Jardin du Luxembourg:

The Jardin du Luxembourg, or the Luxembourg Gardens, is the second largest public park in Paris[1] (224,500 m² (22.5 hectares) located in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France. The park is the garden of the French Senate, which is itself housed in the Luxembourg Palace.

It holds lots of fountains and statues.

And Le Quartier Latin is the neighborhood where famous writers came, wrote, and drank!

I enjoyed reading about the history of different places thanks to plaques; there are many of them now, not only in Paris, but in many cities. Click on the picture to read the text – in French.

And and of course, we had to go and see the famous bookstore Shakespeare And Company, quite a place – and crowded as well.

you can sit…

…or sleep!

If you do not know anything about this bookstore, I recommend these videos: the first one is on George Whitman, the owner for decades, who died last year at age 98.

The second video is on the current owner, Sylvia Beach, George’s own daughter.

The introduction written under each video is worth while reading.

And I can only recommend this website, Open Culture, which published fascinating daily posts.

HAVE YOU BEEN TO SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY?
WHAT DID YOU LIKE ABOUT THE PLACE?

***

Please if possible
include the title of the book or topic in your link:
name of your blog (name of the book title or topic).
Thanks

I love France #17: study abroad – in Paris

I LOVE FRANCE!

I plan to publish this meme every Thursday.
You can share here about any book
or anything cultural you just discovered related to France, Paris, etc.

Please spread the news on Twitter, Facebook, etc !
Feel free to grab my button,
and link your own post through Mister Linky,
at the bottom of this post.

*******

Strolling recently in the Quartier Latin, I stumbled upon a few interesting buildings. That might give you some ideas if you plan to study abroad, or just want to enjoy a walk in Paris.

But first, what is this Quartier Latin?

The Latin Quarter of Paris (French: Quartier latin, IPA: [kaʁtje latɛ̃]) is an area in the 5th and parts of the 6th arrondissement of Paris. It is situated on the left bank of the Seine, around the Sorbonne.

Known for its student life, lively atmosphere and bistros, the Latin Quarter is the home to a number of higher education establishments besides the university itself, such as the École Normale Supérieure, the École des Mines de Paris (a ParisTech institute), the Schola Cantorum, and the Jussieu university campus. Other establishments such as the École Polytechnique (also a ParisTech engineering school) have relocated in recent times to more spacious settings.

The area gets its name from the Latin language, which was once widely spoken in and around the University since Latin was the international language of learning in the Middle Ages. [wikipedia].

Here is a flavor of the neighborhood:

Relaxing, stopping at a terrasse and have some crêpes, while listening to music, or watching vélibs go by – what best way of enjoying Paris?

But OK, I was talking about studying…

Here are a few famous buildings, starting of course with La Sorbonne:

 

La Sorbonne has been the historical house of the former University of Paris. Nowadays, it houses several higher education and research institutions such as Panthéon-Sorbonne University, Sorbonne Nouvelle University, Paris-Sorbonne University, Paris Descartes University, the École Nationale des Chartes and the École pratique des hautes études.

The name is derived from the Collège de Sorbonne, founded in 1257 by Robert de Sorbon as one of the first significant colleges of the medieval University of Paris.[1][2] The university as such predates the college by about a century, and minor colleges had been founded already in the late 12th century. During the 16th century, the Sorbonne became a focal point of the intellectual struggle between Catholics and Protestants. The University served as a major stronghold of Catholic conservative attitudes, and as such conducted a bitter struggle against king Francis I’s policy of relative tolerance towards the French Protestants – except for a brief period in 1533 when the University was placed under Protestant control.

The Collège de Sorbonne was suppressed during the French revolution, reopened by Napoleon in 1808 and finally closed in 1882. This was only one of the many colleges of the University of Paris that existed until the French revolution. [wikipedia]

I then had the joy to discover le collège des Bernardins or Collège Saint-Bernard, established by the Cistercians in the first half of the 13th century, when they started falling into the influence of the university mentality of the time, and desired to send their own monks study theology in Paris, instead of forming them at the monastery, as it had always been done for all the monks of that order before.

Well, sounds like after talking about the Cistercians, I need to talk about the ever present Benedictines of the time, with the prestigious abbey of Cluny.

Opposite the piazza in front of La Sorbonne is the Thermes et hôtel de Cluny, which is now the location of  Le musée national du Moyen Âge. The building also dates from the first half of the 13th century – abbots of Cluny would come there when necessary.

There are many more things to see in Le Quartier Latin, but that will be for another stroll next week.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BUILDING OR PLACE
IN THE QUARTIER LATIN?

***

Please if possible
include the title of the book or topic in your link:
name of your blog (name of the book title or topic).
Thanks