Six degrees of separation: daughter and mother

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
daughter and mother

Time for another quirky variation on this meme.
The book we are starting from and the book I landed on both are about connection between a daughter and her mother! Obviously not calculated on my part.
I also tried hard not to feature books I have already featured with this meme.

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month).

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title (or in the subtitle) offered and find another title with that word in it – see the titles below the images to fully understand, as often the word could be in the second part of the title
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Click on the covers 
links will send you to my review or to the relevant page

No One is Talking About This

This is the book we are supposed to start from.
I haven’t read it and probably will not. I like the plot, but I would probably not like its humor. Some readers I really trust haven’t really enjoyed it either.

“Is there life after the internet?
As this urgent, genre-defying book opens, a woman who has recently been elevated to prominence for her social media posts travels around the world to meet her adoring fans. She is overwhelmed by navigating the new language and etiquette of what she terms “the portal,” where she grapples with an unshakable conviction that a vast chorus of voices is now dictating her thoughts. When existential threats—from climate change and economic precariousness to the rise of an unnamed dictator and an epidemic of loneliness—begin to loom, she posts her way deeper into the portal’s void. An avalanche of images, details, and references accumulate to form a landscape that is post-sense, post-irony, post-everything. “Are we in hell?” the people of the portal ask themselves. “Are we all just going to keep doing this until we die?”
Suddenly, two texts from her mother pierce the fray: “Something has gone wrong,” and “How soon can you get here?” As real life and its stakes collide with the increasingly absurd antics of the portal, the woman confronts a world that seems to contain both an abundance of proof that there is goodness, empathy, and justice in the universe, and a deluge of evidence to the contrary.
Fragmentary and omniscient, incisive and sincere, No One Is Talking About This is at once a love letter to the endless scroll and a profound, modern meditation on love, language, and human connection from a singular voice in American literature. ”

No Man is an Island A Man Lay Dead

  As I Lay Dying  Collector of Dying Breaths cover2  

  Collector  Breath Eyes Memory  

1.  No Man is an Island, by Thomas Merton

To be honest, I read so many books by Merton, a few decades ago, that I don’t remember exactly the content of this one. But anyway, you can never go wrong with this author!
The topics of silence, solitude, and connected are so important, even more today.

2. A Man Lay Dead, by Ngaio Marsh

I so wanted to try this classic author, but the very first volume in the Roderick Alleyn series left me a bit disappointed. I actually read it only three months ago, but didn’t write a review right away, and I already have only vague memory of it.
Should I persevere? There are 33 books in the series.
Have you read volume 2, Enter a Murderer?

3. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner

Now, I really enjoyed this other classic! The different point of views, some from unexpected voices (!) really worked for me for this short atmospheric novel.

4. The Collector of Dying Breaths, by M. J. Rose

A few years ago, I enjoyed M. J. Rose’s style. I read a few books by her. Now, I have gone to other reading horizons.
Here is the recap of my review:

VERDICT: The Collector of Dying Breaths is a smart and unforgettable mix of historical fiction, suspense, and fantasy, with a touch of romance. If you love history, France, and the haunting world of perfumes and fragrances, you won’t want to miss its message on what real love is all about.

5. The Collector, by Anne-Laure Thiéblemont

I really enjoyed this  mystery. Unfortunately, the author passed away befor writing the second volume.

VERDICT: Complex and suspenseful art heist on pre-Columbian art with a smart and unexpected twist. Highly recommended for lovers of art, gems, and mystery.

6. Breath, Eyes, Memory, by Edwidge Danticat

As my 5th book has only one word, I’m stuck, so I used the last word of title 4 to finish this chain! And it happens to be also about a daughter and her mother, like in the starting book!
This was a very powerful and emotional read.

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
IF YOU HAVE CREATED A CHAIN,
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR LINK IN A COMMENT

2021: November wrap-up

NOVEMBER 2021 WRAP-UP

Phew, November was a busy month for book bloggers, with #Nonficnov and #NovellasinNovember (and many more events I didn’t participate in), plus the readalong I co-hosted on The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie.
After 19 months, I also managed to finish my personal project of listening to all of Hercule Poirot novels and short stories collections – I will talk to you more about this another day.
I also got back into the groove of posting Orthodox notes at least every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

📚 Here is what I read in November:

12 books:
7 in print 
with 1,701 pages, a daily average of 56 pages/day
5 in audio
= 31H42
, a daily average of 1H03

7 in mystery:

  1. Third Girl (Hercule Poirot #40), by Agatha Christie
  2. The Hallowe’en Party (Hercule Poirot #41), by Agatha Christie
  3. Elephants Can Remember(Hercule Poirot #42), by Agatha Christie
  4. Curtain (Hercule Poirot #44), by Agatha Christie
  5. The Harlequin Tea Set (Hercule Poirot #46), by Agatha Christie – these first 5 were as audiobooks, for The Classics Club
  6. Le Port  des brumes (Inspecteur Maigret #12), by Georges Simenon – read with a French student. Counts for The Classics Club
  7. A Man Lay Dead, by Ngaio Marsh – Classics spin for The Classics Club

3 in literary fiction:

  1. Le Créa, by Jean-Marc Soyez – a reread in French
  2. The Invention of Morel, by Adolfo Bioy Casares – a novella, read for #NovellasinNovember
  3. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie – for the readalong I cohosted

2 in nonfiction:

  1. Murakami T: The T-Shirts I Love, by Haruki Murakami
  2. The Kingdom of God, by Archbishop Dmitri Royster

MY FAVORITE BOOKS THIS PAST MONTH

  The Invention of Morel Le Créa

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 94/137 (from November 2020-until November 2025)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 12 books
#20BooksofSummer21: 37/20 books
Total of books read in 2021 = 150/120 (125%)

Number of books added to my TBR this past month = 34 (17 of which are nonfiction added thanks to #nonficnov! A dangerous event for our TBRs, as you can see)

OTHER BOOKS  REVIEWED THIS PAST MONTH

Double Identity new cover  The Sleeping Car Murders

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

Books available for swapping

REVIEW COPIES AVAILABLE

Posted on my homepage

And we offer a Book Box!
PERFECT gift – original and affordable
2 books per month for a low price!!

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Double Identity new cover
click on the cover to access my review

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

Nonfiction November: My year 2021 in Nonfiction

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

Let’s Read
please go visit, there are a lot of good things there!

TOP COMMENTERS 

Marianne at Let’s Read
Deb at Readerbuzz
Karen at Booker Talk
please go and visit them,
they have great book blogs

BLOG MILESTONES 

2,415 posts
over 5,540 followers
over 231,660 hits

📚

Come back tomorrow
to see the books I plan to read in December!

📚 📚 📚

How was YOUR month of November?

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!

The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #28

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2020-2025

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

The Classics Spin #28

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #28, I got #12, which on my list was

A Man Lay Dead

I tend to really like classic mysteries, and I have never read anything by Dame Ngaio Marsh (1895-1982), a New Zealand crime writer, so this is perfect!
I plan on reading it in November.

A Man Lay Dead (Roderick Alleyn #1) was published in 1934, this was her first novel.

“At Sir Hubert Handesley’s country house party, five guests have gathered for the uproarious parlor game of “Murder.” Yet no one is laughing when the lights come up on an actual corpse, the good-looking and mysterious Charles Rankin. Scotland Yard’s Inspector Roderick Alleyn arrives to find a complete collection of alibis, a missing butler, and an intricate puzzle of betrayal and sedition in the search for the key player in this deadly game.”

About the Author:
Ngaio MarshDame Ngaio (/ˈn/) Marsh, born Edith Ngaio Marsh, was a New Zealand crime writer and theatre director. There is some uncertainty over her birth date as her father neglected to register her birth until 1900, but she was born in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand.
Of all the “Great Ladies” of the English mystery’s golden age, including Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Dorothy L. Sayers, Ngaio Marsh alone survived to publish in the 1980s. Over a fifty-year span, from 1932 to 1982, Marsh wrote thirty-two classic English detective novels, which gained international acclaim. She did not always see herself as a writer, but first planned a career as a painter.
Marsh’s first novel, A MAN LAY DEAD (1934), which she wrote in London in 1931-32, introduced the detective Inspector Roderick Alleyn: a combination of Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey and a realistically depicted police official at work. Throughout the 1930s Marsh painted occasionally, wrote plays for local repertory societies in New Zealand, and published detective novels. In 1937 Marsh went to England for a period. Before going back to her home country, she spent six months travelling about Europe.

All her novels feature British CID detective Roderick Alleyn. Several novels feature Marsh’s other loves, the theatre and painting. A number are set around theatrical productions (Enter a Murderer, Vintage Murder, Overture to Death, Opening Night, Death at the Dolphin, and Light Thickens), and two others are about actors off stage (Final Curtain and False Scent). Her short story “‘I Can Find My Way Out” is also set around a theatrical production and is the earlier “Jupiter case” referred to in Opening Night. Alleyn marries a painter, Agatha Troy, whom he meets during an investigation (Artists in Crime), and who features in several later novels. [Goodreads]

Have you read it, or any other novel by Ngaio Marsh?
What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

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Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spins:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

On the Edge of the World  Sanshiro The Sleepwalkers

For Classics Spin, #21, I got # 5: On the Edge of the World, by Nikolai Leskov

For Classics Spin, #22, I got # 13: Sanshiro, by Natsume Soseki

For Classics Spin, #24, I got # 18: The Sleepwalkers, by Hermann Broch, which I didn’t take time to read!!

The Letter Killers Club History in English Words

For Classics Spin, #25, I got # 14: The Letter Killers Club – which was way over my head.

For Classics Spin, #26, I got # 11: History in English Words, by Owen Barfield, a fascinating book, which I haven’t reviewed yet!!

 

 

 

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HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT BOOK DID YOU GET FOR THIS SPIN?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

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