Friday Face Off: Made for each other

Friday Face Off

The Friday Face-Off was originally created by Books by Proxy:
each Friday, bloggers showcase book covers on a weekly theme.
Visit Lynn’s Books (@LynnsBooks) for a list of upcoming themes.
Please visit also Tammy at Books, Bones & Buffy (@tammy_sparks)
thanks to whom I discovered this meme.

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This week, the theme is “Made for each other

The theme for Top Ten Tuesday this week was Dynamic Duos. I find today’s meme quite close, so I decided to choose one of the ten books I featured on Tuesday:

Because of Winn-Dixie

Click on the cover to read my review

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Click on the picture if you want to identify the various editions
You can also right click and ‘open image in new tab’ to zoom in

WHICH COVER IS YOUR FAVORITE? WHY?

face off made for each other

My favorite is the first cover (Candlewick Press).
I see a few other interesting covers, but in this one, Opal and Winn-Dixie really look at each other, and you can see there’s real communication between them.

If you haven’t read it, do it now, it’s a fabulous Middle Grade book.

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Have you read this book?
WHICH COVER IS YOUR FAVORITE? WHY?
Next Friday: Gadgets and airships

Book review: How Do You Live?

How Do You Live

How Do You Live?
by Yoshino Genzaburo
Translated from the Japanese
by Bruno Navasky

 Algonquin Young Readers
10/26/2021
First published as 君たちはどう生きるか
in 1937
288 pages
Fiction / Middle Grade

Goodreads

Buy the book on my Bookshop

This is my second book for the Japanese Literature Challenge 15.
Like Neil Gaiman (as he explains in the introduction), I decided to read this classic Japanese middle grade book, because Miyazaki decided to come out of retirement to make an anime on it, his favorite children’s book. I wanted to read How Do You Live? before watching the movie.
Actually as Miyazaki does everything by hand, it’s going to take a while to finish. Will it be out in 2023? It could also take much longer.
How Do You Live? was written in 1937 by a Japanese author, so this book has not much in common with contemporary American middle grade books.

Click to continue reading