Audiobook review: Trip Through Your Wires

Trip Through Your Wires

Trip Through Your Wires

Author:
Sarah Layden
Narrator:
Sarah Layden
Publisher:
Author’s Republic

Audio Release date: Aug 23, 2016
Listening length:
8 hours and 42 mn
ISBN: 978-1938126178
also available in print and as ebook
Genre: literary fiction

Goodreads

 

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

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I was approached by the author, narrator herself of her novel Trip Through Your Wires, half set in Mexico and the US. Interested in diversity, I accepted to read the book, and am glad I did.

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Book reviews: The Third and Fourth Rules of Ten

 

 The Third Rule of Ten
The Fourth Rule of Ten

Third rule of tenThe 4th rule of ten

 

The Third Rule of Ten
The Fourth Rule of Ten
By
Gay Hendricks and Tinker Lindsay

Publisher:  Hay House Publishing
Pub. Date:
2/3/2014 and 1/5/2015

ISBN: 978-1401941673 – 352 pages
and 978-1401945947 – 344 pages



Genre:  mystery / Detective
Source: Received through Netgalley

Goodreads

In full compliance with FTC Guidelines,
I received this ebook for free in exchange for a fair and honest review.
I was in no way compensated for this post as a reviewer, and the thoughts are my own.

These books count for the following Reading Challenges

2015 ebook my-kind-of-mystery-2015 

                New-Release-Challenge

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THESE BOOKS

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It is not that usual that a detective happens to be an ex-Buddhist monk! That explains partly why I enjoy this series and keep reading the books as they come out. Both The Third Rule of Ten and The Fourth Rule of Ten are full of suspense and of very hot current topic. I have already presented The First Rule of Ten and The Second Rule of Ten on this blog.
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(2012) #65 review: Itinerary

Itinerary:
An Intellectual Journey

by

Octavio PAZ

Translated by Jason Wilson

Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2000
Published first in Spanish in 1995

Itinerary

THIS BOOK COUNTS FOR THE FOLLOWING
READING CHALLENGES

            

    

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

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Octavio Paz’s Itinerary through space was varied: time in Spain (an educative time where he discovered Criticism), 10 years in the US, then post-war years in Paris, where he met the French giant writers of the time (Aragon, Eluard, Mauriac, Malraux, René Char and Sartre, to list a few), and finally some time in South East Asia as a diplomat.

So this short book is rich of his diversified experience, in areas of philosophy, literature and politics.

This led to what I would call a haunting questionnement on the identity and place of Mexico in the world. He analyses here the Mexican revolution and presents a dialectical history between solitude and communion, with reflections on revolt/revolution, tradition/modernity.

Most of his life he was haunted by the question of the true historical nature of the Soviet Union.

There are meaningful passages on nationalism (pp.79-80) and democracy.

Finally, I would say this little dense book by Mexico’s Nobel Prize of literature is the perfect illustration of “his solitary solidarity” with the world; this is a phrase he uses on p.61 to define Camus.

FAVORITE QUOTATIONS

“We must find ways of humanizing the market; otherwise, it will devour us and devour the planet.” P.85

“Freedom and education for everybody, contrary to what the Enlightenment believed, has led us not to become familiar with Plato or Cervantes but to reading comics and best-sellers.” p.86

How can democracy, that presupposes implicitly a static society or one endowed with a circular movement, adapt itself to modern societies that worship change? p.89

WHAT IS IT ABOUT

 Itinerary is somewhat autobiographical, for it is the story of the evolution of my political ideas. An intellectual biography but also a sentimental and even passionate one: what I thought and think about my time is inseparable from what I felt and feel. Itinerary is the story and description of a journey through time, from one point to another, from my youth to my present moment. The line that traces this plan is neither straight nor circular but a spiral that turns back ceaselessly and ceaselessly distances itself from the point of departure. What we are living today brings me close to what I lived seventy years back and, simultaneously, irremediably and definitively distances me. Strange lesson: there is no turning back but there is no point of arrival. We are in transit. Itinerary is the final work of a great thinker and magnificent writer. [Goodreads]

Octavio Paz

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Awarded the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature “for impassioned writing with wide horizons, characterized by sensuous intelligence and humanistic integrity.”

 

REVIEWS BY OTHERS

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