Six degrees of separation: From Moscow to Vimy

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Moscow to Vimy

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started in Moscow and ended up in Vimy, France, where many Canadian soldiers fought during WWI.
Come with me!

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

After the covers,
you can find the links to my reviews
or to the title on Goodreads

 a-gentleman-in-moscowArsene Lupin 

 Mrs Pollifax and the second thiefStar For Mrs Blake

 Shakespeare's Star warsUnravelled

1. A Gentleman in Moscow
I was going to read it, as I have heard so many people rave about this book. But then, I talked with a Russian woman, and she told this could really never have happened in Moscow. As it’s a historical fiction, and I like my histfic to be based on real facts, I’ve passed so far. But you may convince me to read it?

2. Arsène Lupin, Gentleman-Thief
The author Leblanc is basically the French Conan Doyle. This is a major classic in mystery, and totally fun! He’s a thief, yes, but what a gentleman!!

3. Mrs. Pollifax and the Second Thief
I discovered Mrs. Pollifax, because I wanted to read books set in different countries, for the 52 countries challenge.
I have loved this series to pieces, the character of Mrs. Pollifax is delightful: image a retired lady who’s afraid to get bored, and ends up working as a secret agent. Each book of the series is set in a  different country. This one is in Sicily, and is about art thieves and the mob.

4. A Star For Mrs. Blake
Excellent historical novel featuring Gold Star Mothers, whom I knew nothing about.
VERDICT: Very powerful, yet not overwhelmingly emotional historical novel, reflecting on many facets of international conflicts. Highly recommended to anyone curious to know what happened on the field of WWI, and how it affected people, relationships, and countries.

5. William Shakespeare’s Star Wars
This is an incredible series: imagine Star Wars, “all recounted in the style of the Bard,
with rhymes, chorus, list of characters entering and exiting for each scene, just like a real play. It really made me laugh aloud many times.”
VERDICT: For fans of Star Wars and Shakespeare,  this book offers a refreshing look at how it all began. Tension, suspense and humor are all present. Not to miss.
(the link is to book 1)

6. Unravelled: Two Wars. Two Affairs. One marriage
Another great historical novel, both on WWI and WWII. Great author!

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
DID YOU PLAY
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?

 

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Book review: Arsene Lupin, Gentleman-Thief

Arsene Lupin

Arsene Lupin, Gentleman-Thief

by Maurice Leblanc
Published in 1907
Genres: Mystery, Detective, Classics, France, Short Stories
Pages: 279
Goodreads

Eiffel Tower Orange

Yesterday, I explained to you how 2017 was a Sherlock Holmes year for me.  He seemed to pursue me even further, as the latest Classics Club spin, #16, fell on Arsène Lupin, gentleman-cambrioleur, a somewhat French equivalent to the detective adventures, as I explain below. I obviously read it in French, but present here the cover and the title in English: Arsene Lupin, Gentleman-Thief. 

Click to continue reading

The Classics Spin #16: what I got

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #16

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc.

I’m really thrilled, because:

  • it’s a French classic
  • it’s a mystery, and I’m in a mystery mood
  • perfect timing, as I recently finished reading ALL of Sherlock Holmes, plus The Sherlock Holmes Book (DK Publishing), which does open to major other mystery classics – such as Arsène Lupin. It will be interesting to compare characters and plot.

So I have until end of December to read and review it.
It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See what this is all about.

HAVE YOU READ THESE TITLES?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT IS YOUR #4?

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