Paris in July 2022: Day 5

Paris in July 2022 (Bigger Sunset)

Paris in July 2022
#ParisinJuly
Co-hosted by Readerbuzz and Thyme For Tea

Day 5

Sharing more on the 26 French books I have read so far this year.
Actually a lot of these I have listened to.

Click on the covers to read my full review,
or get more details on the books

Read in February-March:

Intuitio Gataca

Intuitio
This was an intriguing thriller on a fascinating topic: intuition.
A woman working for the FBI knows about this author (main character in the book) who seems to have an amazing intuition. So they hire him to try to identify a terrorist who’s been bombing towers all over the US, and also to try to identify the next target.
It’s based on real scientific data. In fact, Gounelle explains that he went through these tests, and they seem to work. And some police forces do use these techniques.
I liked the pace, and some great twists in the plot.

Gataca
The first chapters are VERY depressing, but then, it becomes so fascinating with Thilliez’ usual gift at inserting awesome and accurate science into his novels.
Here genetics and evolutionary paleontology. I learned so much, for instance on laterality. The parts about lactose intolerance were so informative.

Lean On Me Chez les Flamands

Lean on Me
VERDICT: Romance and social analysis of the impact of urban life on human nature. An exquisite French mix.

Chez les Flamands
As usual, Simenon is fabulous at creating and describing an ambiance. The city seems both half asleep and violent, with the cold rain and the raging waters of the Meuse, flooding the area.
What is special to this novel, is the description of the animosity between French and Flemish people in the same city.

  Le Fou de Bergerac L'Aiguille creuse

Le Fou de Bergerac
Yes, you are going to see a bunch of Maigret books here, as I have been reading them in order with one of my French students.
This was an unusual one. For the first time in the series, there was a lot of humor, in Maigret’s situation and habits, and in the descriptions of locals.
And for once, we really get to know Madame Maigret.

L’Aiguille creuse
The style does betray its age (the book was published in 1909), but still, I enjoyed the plot, the enigma, and the characters – especially of course the many disguises adopted by Lupin; but also Herlock Sholmès!
It was neat to see also how we get closer and closer to discover the real meaning of the title.

HAVE YOU READ THESE BOOKS?
OR BOOKS BY THESE AUTHORS?

It’s so Classic Book tag

it's so classic blog party

In August, there was a Classics book tag going around the blogosphere. I didn’t participate at the time. But then, I saw Brona’s post, and she tagged whoever wanted to participate.
As I recently finished reading my
first list of 50 books for The Classics Club, I thought I would use these questions to do some type of recap.
So I’m exclusively considering these 50 books to answer the following questions.
Which means that I’ll probably have different answers if I do it again (I might) when I’m done with my 2nd list of 50 titles.
I’m also not considering all the other classics I read before joining The Classics Club.

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What is one classic that hasn’t been made into a movie yet, but really needs to?

I think it would be neat to make a movie on Travels with Charley. It would be a great piece of Americana. I’d see Robert Duvall as a great John Steinbeck.

What draws you to classics?

DonQuixoteMy thinking is that if we have not stopped reading these books along the years and the centuries, it means they have a message or value for all ages, and so for mine as well. So I’m curious to see what it could be.
Also, incidentally, I really love the online community built around the classics, especially through The Classics Club. It’s really great that so many people from many countries can interact on these treasures of humanity.
I’m thinking for instance of Don Quixote, and the 3 readalongs organized around it this year that I know of.
Be sure to visit also this amazing interview with Silvia of this work – and most insightful comments on my and her post.

What is an underrated classic?

Arsene LupinMaybe a book that is on the verge of being forgotten, a bit like an endangered species, and not too many people have read it, for a reason or another. But when you read it, you realize its content can definitely be understood and is meaningful for us today.
I could mention here Arsène Lupin, not that well known in English speaking circles. Yet, it is a seminal series for the mystery genres, and offers a unique perspective on a life of crime, very different from the current tendency of gruesome and violent thrillers.

What is one classic that you didn’t expect to love, but ended up loving anyway?

A Moveable FeastI don’t remember fondly, to say the least, the various novels by Hemingway I read. But so many readers were talking about A Moveable Feast, that I was intrigued and thought I should give it a try, especially as it is set in my native country!
I was probably also feeling ashamed I had never read it. But I approached it with fear and trembling, because of my past experience with this author. Yet, I loved the book very much. It definitely helped it was nonfiction actually. I loved the description and evocation of the place and time, plus the various people we meet in it. Beautiful prose!

What is your most favorite and least favorite classics?

Charlotte's WebThis is a very difficult question, even if I only consider here these 50 titles!
My most favorite of these 50 titles might well be Charlotte’s Web, for its beautiful prose and message. And I love so much the last line! Look at my review if you forgot that line. But obviously, there are tons of other titles I really enjoyed in this list.

As for the one I liked least, I’m also going to choose a children’s book. I was very disappointed by The Secret of the Old Clock, even though I was told I should appreciate the fact that this genre was almost revolutionary at the time. I’m not too sure I read it as a kid in France, so if I read it, apparently it didn’t impress me either at the time. Back then, I read the series by Enid Blyton, and loved it a lot!

What is your favorite character from a classic? Or if that is too hard, one is your favorite classic character trope (e.g. strong and silent, quiet sidekick, etc.)

Francie, in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. I love her outlook on life, and how important books are in her life.

What’s a popular classic that you felt wasn’t actually that great?

Whose Body? by Dorothy Sayers. I was rather disappointed, I didn’t like the social aspect of it. But I’m intrigued that the series is so popular, so I’ll give it another chance and plan to read volume 2.

Who is your favorite classic author?

I’m going to say Marcel Proust. Reading his whole In Search of Lost Time was a fantastic experience. It is so rich! And even if there are some boring passages, like an interminable meal lasting 50 pages or more, what’s really neat with Proust is that suddenly, when you are almost ready to give up, you bump into a real gem of a sentence. So don’t give up!
Actually the very last book is beautiful, with lots of fascinating pages on the art of writing. I now understand why a friend of mine starts reading it again when she’s done, I think she’s read it all 4 or 5 times. If I were younger, I would read it again, as there are so many connections between the different books that you cannot possibly see when you read it only once.

In your opinion, what makes a classic a classic?

I basically answered this question at the beginning. I think it’s a book with a universal message, universal as far as location and time. That whatever culture it was written in, it can apply to all. And whatever time it was created in, it is still meaning today, because it deals with some things that are very deep in our human psyche and life experience.

Relating to newer books, what attributes does a book need to have in order to be worthy of the title “classic”?

the-martian-chroniclesI would say the same as I answered in the previous question.
This could apply for instance to science-fiction classics, (I read The Martian Chronicles; We; Solaris) as they deal with our deep human need for connection with others, with our deep need to prove that we are not alone out there, as Arthur C. Clarke beautifully highlights in Childhood’s End, which I recently listened to (as my first book for my second list of 50 titles!).

Bonus question: Is there a classic you don’t seem to understand?

Yes, I have no clue what C. S. Lewis is really talking about in Till We Have Faces, even though I had a whole discussion with a reading group at my church on this book.

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That’s it. Let me know
if you were surprised by some of my answers.

If you feel tempted by these questions,
please post your answers and give me your link.
I’m curious to see what YOU think

Six degrees of separation: From Moscow to Vimy

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Moscow to Vimy

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started in Moscow and ended up in Vimy, France, where many Canadian soldiers fought during WWI.
Come with me!

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

After the covers,
you can find the links to my reviews
or to the title on Goodreads

 a-gentleman-in-moscowArsene Lupin 

 Mrs Pollifax and the second thiefStar For Mrs Blake

 Shakespeare's Star warsUnravelled

1. A Gentleman in Moscow
I was going to read it, as I have heard so many people rave about this book. But then, I talked with a Russian woman, and she told this could really never have happened in Moscow. As it’s a historical fiction, and I like my histfic to be based on real facts, I’ve passed so far. But you may convince me to read it?

2. Arsène Lupin, Gentleman-Thief
The author Leblanc is basically the French Conan Doyle. This is a major classic in mystery, and totally fun! He’s a thief, yes, but what a gentleman!!

3. Mrs. Pollifax and the Second Thief
I discovered Mrs. Pollifax, because I wanted to read books set in different countries, for the 52 countries challenge.
I have loved this series to pieces, the character of Mrs. Pollifax is delightful: image a retired lady who’s afraid to get bored, and ends up working as a secret agent. Each book of the series is set in a  different country. This one is in Sicily, and is about art thieves and the mob.

4. A Star For Mrs. Blake
Excellent historical novel featuring Gold Star Mothers, whom I knew nothing about.
VERDICT: Very powerful, yet not overwhelmingly emotional historical novel, reflecting on many facets of international conflicts. Highly recommended to anyone curious to know what happened on the field of WWI, and how it affected people, relationships, and countries.

5. William Shakespeare’s Star Wars
This is an incredible series: imagine Star Wars, “all recounted in the style of the Bard,
with rhymes, chorus, list of characters entering and exiting for each scene, just like a real play. It really made me laugh aloud many times.”
VERDICT: For fans of Star Wars and Shakespeare,  this book offers a refreshing look at how it all began. Tension, suspense and humor are all present. Not to miss.
(the link is to book 1)

6. Unravelled: Two Wars. Two Affairs. One marriage
Another great historical novel, both on WWI and WWII. Great author!

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
DID YOU PLAY
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?