Read or skip #3

READ OR SKIP

Inspired by book blogger Davida, at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog, herself inspired by a couple of other bloggers (see here for instance). I plan to post about it on Saturdays, except the 1st Sat of the month, when I usually feature another meme.

The rules are simple:

  1. Sort your Goodreads TBR shelf from oldest to new
  2. Pick the first 5 or 10 (or whatever number you choose, depending on how large your list is) books you see
  3. Decide whether to keep them or get rid of them.

RESULTS FOR PREVIOUS READ OR SKIP

READ: 6, 7
MAYBE: 9 (I created a new Goodreads shelf for this – To read, maybe)
SKIP: 5, 8

read-or-skip-2

READ OR SKIP #3

#readorskip

Reading, language, translation.

read-or-skip-3

 

 

8) Parisians: An Adventure History of Paris

9) Days of Reading

  • “In these inspiring essays about why we read, Proust explores all the pleasures and trials that we take from books.”
  • Short book, great topic, nice opportunity to read a bit more by Proust, after having read all of his In Search of Lost Time
    READ

10) Hunting and Gathering

  • Long book
  • BUT I liked the first book I read by her, French Leave. I’m sure she has even more to offer. Lots of great ratings
    READ

11) Mouse or Rat? Translation as Negotiation

  • “‘Translation is always a shift, not between two languages but between two cultures. A translator must take into account rules that are not strictly linguistic but, broadly speaking, cultural.’ Umberto Eco is of the world’s most brilliant and entertaining writers on literature and language. In this accessible and dazzling study, he turns his eye on the subject of translations and the problems the differences between cultures can cause. The book is full of little gems about mistranslations and misunderstandings.”
  • Great author, especially language, and topic of great interest to me, as a translator myself
    READ

12) Limits of Language

  • Great topic
  • BUT sounds more like snippets, the humor may bother me, plus apparently the author uses the pronoun ‘she’ by default, which always drives me nuts. I read, ‘she’, and am, wait, who is talking about>
    SKIP

So now, what do YOU think? Am I right to skip 8 and 12? Any other I should skip?
I will inform you of my final choice when I publish the next post for this meme.

HAVE YOU READ THESE?
READ OR SKIP?
I ALSO WELCOME SUGGESTIONS
FOR GOOD BOOKS ON SIMILAR THEMES

 

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Nonfiction November 2018: Expert on books on books

Nonfiction-November-2018-1-300x300

#NonficNov

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule

Be The Expert/Ask the Expert
/Become the Expert

hosted by Julie @ JulzReads

Three ways to join in this week!
You can either share 3 or more books
on a single topic that you have read and can recommend (be the expert),
you can put the call out for good nonfiction on a specific topic
that you have been dying to read (ask the expert),
or you can create your own list of books
on a topic that you’d like to read (become the expert).

This year, I would love to become the expert, on reading these nonfiction books-on-books that have been on my TBR for a while

Click on the covers to know more about them

books on books expert 1

books on books expert 2

HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE?
WHICH ONE WOULD YOU RECOMMEND MOST?
WHAT’S YOUR AREA OF NONFICTION EXPERTISE?

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Six degrees of separation: from fair to dining

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from fair to dining!

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started with a title containing the word Fair (I did have to break my rule and start with the second word, as I didn’t have any title on my shelves with the word ‘vanity’) and ended up dining.
This is really fun, you never know where you’ll end up.

Here are my own quirky rules:

  1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
  2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
  3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
  4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word

After the covers, you can find the links of my reviews or the title on Goodreads:

  vanity fair  Death at the Fair

  death-comes-for-the-archbishop  reader come home

  Proust's Search dining with proust

 

1. Vanity Fair = I confess I have never read anything by Thackeray, and I don’t really intend to, unless you manage to convince me!
2. Death at the Fair = very good historical novel by a Midwestern author I met at a book festival. Set during the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago
3. Death Comes for the Archbishop= great author, great classic, where the main character is the landscape – in my opinion
4. Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World = this one is on my TBR
5. Marcel Proust’s Search for Lost Time: A Reader’s Guide to the Remembrance of Things Past =  I read this a few years ago, as a companion to my reading of the seven books of In Search of Lost Time (here is my review of volume 1)- this title is closer to the French title.
So I would read one volume, and then read the corresponding chapter in this book, as a recap. After I finished the 7 books, I finished reading this book, which has lots of great background information on Proust’s society and times

6. Dining with Marcel Proust: A Practical Guide to French Cuisine of the Belle Epoque = obviously, I also read this one after I finished my Proust adventure. Click on the link to discover why I found it so cool!

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HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
HAVE YOU PLAYED
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?