Six degrees of separation: from beauty to truth

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from
beauty to truth

This is really cool!
Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started with a mystery and indeed on one.
Here are my own quirky rules:

  1. Use your list of books on Goodreads

  2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it

  3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title

  4. Or the second if the title starts by the same word

So here is the result for March 2018. I’m quite happy I managed to do it with the main part of titles, and all with books I have read and liked.
Plus starting with Beauty and ending up with Truth, that’s neat.
After the covers, you can find the links of my reviews or the title on Goodreads:

Beauty Myth   Beauty for ashes

The Ashes of Heaven's Pillar   Pigs in heaven

  the true story of 3 little pigs  True North

1. The Beauty Myth = I haven’t read it, and don’t plan too, not interested in that type of topics
2. Beauty For Ashes = interesting story of  a Greek village
3. The Ashes of Heaven‘s Pillar = wonderful historical novel
4. Pigs in Heaven = I love all the books by Kingsolver!
5. The True Story of 3 Little Pigs =  a quirky twist on a classic
6. True North = Jill Ker Conway is a fascinating person. This is the sequel to The Road From Coorain.
Both books are highly recommended, if you like to read about strong women of your time.

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
HAVE YOU PLAYED
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?

Book review: The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar – I love France #110

I LOVE FRANCE!

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or anything cultural you just discovered related to France, Paris, etc.

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The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar

The Ashes of Heaven's Pillar

In full compliance with FTC Guidelines,
I received this ebook for free
in exchange
for a fair and honest review.
I was in no way compensated
for this post as a reviewer,
and the thoughts are my own.
The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar
by
Kim Rendfeld
Publisher: Fireship Press
Release Date: August 28, 2014

 

ISBN:  978-1611793062
Pages: 396

Genre:
Historical Fiction 

Source: Received
from the publisher for a
virtual book tour

Goodreads

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Amazon Canada,
and other countries
as well as Barnes & Noble.

This book counts for the following Reading Challenges:

      books-on-france-14    2014 historical fiction    2014 Ebook-2

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

new eiffel 5

For once, let me tell you about some personal background here.
I discovered Kim Rendfeld three years ago and wrote a review of The Cross And The Dragon. So last April when I was approached by Fireship Press to review her latest book, I said yes right away, not really bothering to read the synopsis: as I wrote recently about Murakami, with some authors I like very much, I actually prefer to jump into the book knowing nothing about it.

You may remember that in March, I had completed my translation of a long historical novel into French, Orgueil et honneur, by Nathaniel Burns. It was a fascinating book on Widukind and Charlemagne and the key battles between the Saxons and the Franks. I enjoyed a lot the book and doing the translation, even though the publisher has yet to send me one cent for my hard work –more about that another time!
So what a happy surprise when I finally got to start reading Kim’s novel, The Ashes of Heaven’s Pillar, and discovered there Widukind, Father Sturm and other characters I had been so close to while translating Burns’ book! I am still shocked I was intrigued by the title and never thought for a second it was referring to the famous Irminsul!! The Irminsul was the sacred tree maybe, site for sure, for the Saxons and their pagan religion. Led by Charlemagne, the Franks destroyed it in 772.
Set on this background, Kim presents us the life of a Saxon family, their hardships and how they ended up living in Francia.
Click to continue reading