Six degrees of separation: from a Japanese American author to a Japanese nuclear power plant

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from a Japanese American author
to a Japanese nuclear power plant

Time for another quirky variation on this meme.
I’m so thrilled I started with a Japanese American author, and ended up in Japan, of course without anything planned ahead.

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest
(see there the origin of the meme and how it works
– posted the first Saturday of every month).

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title (or in the subtitle) offered and find another title with that word in it – see the titles below the images to fully understand, as often the word could be in the second part of the title
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

The Book of Form and Emptiness

This is the book we are supposed to start from.
I have not read it, and I am not sure I want to read it. I first want to red another book by this author, A Tale for the Time Being.

A brilliantly inventive new novel about loss, growing up, and our relationship with things, by the Booker Prize-finalist author of A Tale for the Time Being.
After the tragic death of his beloved musician father, fourteen-year-old Benny Oh begins to hear voices. The voices belong to the things in his house–a sneaker, a broken Christmas ornament, a piece of wilted lettuce. Although Benny doesn’t understand what these things are saying, he can sense their emotional tone; some are pleasant, a gentle hum or coo, but others are snide, angry and full of pain. When his mother, Annabelle, develops a hoarding problem, the voices grow more clamorous.
At first, Benny tries to ignore them, but soon the voices follow him outside the house, onto the street and at school, driving him at last to seek refuge in the silence of a large public library, where objects are well-behaved and know to speak in whispers. There, Benny discovers a strange new world, where “things happen.” He falls in love with a mesmerizing street artist with a smug pet ferret, who uses the library as her performance space. He meets a homeless philosopher-poet, who encourages him to ask important questions and find his own voice amongst the many.
And he meets his very own Book–a talking thing–who narrates Benny’s life and teaches him to listen to the things that truly matter.
With its blend of sympathetic characters, riveting plot, and vibrant engagement with everything from jazz, to climate change, to our attachment to material possessions, The Book of Form and Emptiness is classic Ruth Ozeki–bold, wise, poignant, playful, humane and heartbreaking.
  ”

6 degrees Aug 2022

The Book of Form and Emptiness

1. The Book of Tea, by Kakuzo Okakura

I learned a lot about tea, its origin, the three major eras and ways of enjoying it – boiled, whipped, and finally steeped. Only recently have we been steeping it. And did you know it used to be drunk with salt in it?
See my review

2. Infused: Adventures In Teaby Henrietta Lovell

I haven’t read this one yet, it’s been on my TBR since last December.
Have you read it?

Henrietta Lovell is best known as ‘The Rare Tea Lady’. She is on a mission to revolutionise the way we drink tea by replacing industrially produced teabags with the highest quality tea leaves. Her quest has seen her travel to the Shire Highlands of Malawi, across the foothills of the Himalayas, and to hidden gardens in the Wuyi-Shan to source the world’s most extraordinary teas.
Infused invites us to discover these remarkable places, introducing us to the individual growers and household name chefs Lovell has met along the way – and reveals the true pleasures of tea. The result is a delicious infusion of travel writing, memoir, recipes, and glorious photography, all written with Lovell’s unique charm and wit.

3. Are We French Yet? Keith & Val’s Adventures in Provence, by Keith Van Sickle

VERDICT: Nice collections of funny and culturally aware vignettes highlighting how life can be enriched by being familiar with two cultures.
Full review here

4. Fairy Tales for the Disillusioned: Enchanted Stories from the French Decadent Tradition, by Gretchen Schultz (Editor), Lewis Seifert (Editor)

VERDICT: Remarkable anthology of famous fairy tales as reinterpreted by French authors of the Decadent movement. Fascinating and very enjoyable example of comparative literature at its best.
Read my 5 star review

5. Goddess Power: A Kids’ Book of Greek and Roman Mythology: 10 Empowering Tales of Legendary Women, by Yung In Chae

VERDICT: Very pretty and well done summary of Greek mythology for children, teens, and adults.
Another 5 star review

6. Ichi-F: A Worker’s Graphic Memoir of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, by Kazuto Tatsuta

This graphic nonfiction was absolutely fascinating. This is a big book, 561 pages, with a lot to read on each page. But so worth it!
Check some of my thoughts

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
IF YOU HAVE CREATED A CHAIN,
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR LINK IN A COMMENT

Nonfiction November 2020: Book Pairings

nonficnov2020

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule
#nonficnov

Book Pairings

hosted by Julz of Julz Reads

This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title.
It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!”
or just two titles that you think would go well together.
Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history
by reading a nonfiction version of the story.

Today, I’m offering you 3 novels paired with 3 nonfiction books I read this year

Click on the covers to get more details

BOOK PAIRING #1

BIRDS

Vesper Flights Migrations

Migrations:
VERDICT: Both beautiful and heart-wrenching. And of course, a must for all birders.
Franny, from Galway, Ireland, knows that it’s probably the last time the Arctic Terns are migrating, so she decided to follow and accompany them on their last journey.
She goes to Greenland, where the bird starts its migration, and manages to convince Captain Ennis Malone to accept her on his shipping boat The Saghani. His crew has had a hard time finding fish, also because of global warming and all we have done to our planet, but Franny is a scientist and knows that the Arctic Tern adjusts its route to where they can find fish to eat. So that should work, right?
Things get complicated…

BOOK PAIRING #2

MARIE-ANTOINETTE

 Marie Antoinette's World MARIE antoinette

Becoming Marie-Antoinette:
The book is excellent at describing the royal families and all the petty details of everyday life, from the rising to the preparation for the night;  at showing what it would have taken to become the queen of France, lots of advantages maybe, but also lots of sacrifices.

BOOK PAIRING #3

TEA

 The Book of Tea broken teaglass

The Broken Teaglass:
Take words, a job with words and dictionaries, and a good mystery, well, how could I resist that!
A neat, smart, very enjoyable and quick read.

HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE?
WOULD YOU HAVE ANOTHER
BOOK PAIRING RELATED TO BIRDS OR TEA?

2020: January wrap-up

JANUARY 2020 WRAP-UP

📚 Wow, 2020 has been starting crazy on the reading scene. I have been reading a lot, according to my standards.

📚 Besides The Classics Club, I have been doing the Japanese Literature Challenge (until March), I joined the #Pondathon (a reading competition: I earn points for my #Xiaolong team based on the number of pages I read and the number of books I finish), and the Murakami online Book Club.
Oh and of course at the beginning of January was Bout of Books. It was a busy week, so I didn’t read as much as I wanted, but still it worked fine.

📚 The biggest news for me is that so far, I have managed to review all the books I have been reading this month, and even started catching up on books read last year.
Posting again for the Sunday Post has been very helpful for that, as I post there small reviews when a much longer review is really unnecessary.
I also enjoy doing a Book Journal section in this weekly Sunday Post: I update it every day, recapitulating what I read the night before. Looks like more and more of you have been enjoying this section of my post as well. This helps me keep track and be more consistent.

📚 There were lots of posts in the blogosphere related to the previous decade. In case you missed them, I have a post on my favorite books and one on my favorite book covers of the past decade.

📚 Also, as I am reading a difficult Orthodox theology book, I have been again reposting book notes after a couple of chapters or so on my Orthodox blog.
I suddenly remembered I had lots of Orthodox notes and quotations on a very old book blog, so I’m going to republish these on my new Orthodox blog the coming months.

So here are the titles I read in January:

11 books:
8 in print 
with 1,862 pages, an average of 60 pages/day
3 in audio
= 11H37
, an average of 22 minutes

5 in literary fiction:

  1. Book of Genesis – audio
  2. Sanshiro, by Natsume Soseki – ebook
  3. Goddess Power, by Yung In Chae – for review
  4. And Then, by Natsume Soseki – ebook
  5. The Gate, by Natsume Soseki – ebook, review will be live on 2/4

What a wonderful experience to read Soseki’s whole trilogy in the same month

4 in mystery:

  1. Perfect Little Children, by Sophie Hannah – ebook, for review
  2. Eagle Strike, by Anthony Horowitz
  3. Pietr-le-Letton, by Georges Simenon – ebook
  4. The Haunted Bookshop, by Christopher Morley – audio

1 in children:

  1. Crenshaw, by Katherine Applegate

1 in nonfiction:

  1. The Book of Tea, by Kakuzo Okakura – ebook

It feels so good to see all these links under the books I read THIS month!

MY FAVORITE BOOKS IN JANUARY

And Then  The Book of Tea

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 15/50 (from October 2019-until September 2024)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 4 books read

Total of books read in 2020 = 11/110
Number of books added to my TBR this past month= 9 (less than 10, I deserve some applaud, lol)

OTHER BOOKS I REVIEWED IN JANUARY

Besides the books above listed, this month I also reviewed:

Lady Clementine  Dreamland   Treachery

Figure Drawing for Kids Dogs Logic Puzzles The Fascinating Animal Book fort Kids

Essential Keto Bread The Healthy Breakfast Cookbook   Minimalism

 

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Dreamland

click on the cover to access my review 

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

The Ten Most Recent Additions to my 2020 bookshelf

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

That Artsy Reader Girl
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Come back on Monday
to see the books I plan to read in February


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How was YOUR month of January?

2019-Monthly-Wrap-Up-Round-Up_300

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!