Six degrees of separation: from asking to spelling

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from asking to spelling

Time for another quirky variation on this meme. I started with asking a question, making up the title we are supposed to begin with, and ended up with spelling.

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month).

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title (or in the subtitle) offered and find another title with that word in it – see the titles below the images to fully understand, as often the word could be in the second part of the title
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Click on the covers 
links will send you to my review or to the relevant Goodreads page

What are you going through  Or What You Will

Twelfth Night  The Lost Love Letters

The Lost Spells   The History of English Spelling

1.  What Are You Going Through, by Sigrid Nunez

I have not read this book, and probably will not.

“A woman describes a series of encounters she has with various people in the ordinary course of her life: an ex she runs into by chance at a public forum, an Airbnb owner unsure how to interact with her guests, a stranger who seeks help comforting his elderly mother, a friend of her youth now hospitalized with terminal cancer. In each of these people the woman finds a common need: the urge to talk about themselves and to have an audience to their experiences. The narrator orchestrates this chorus of voices for the most part as a passive listener, until one of them makes an extraordinary request, drawing her into an intense and transformative experience of her own.
In What Are You Going Through, Nunez brings wisdom, humor, and insight to a novel about human connection and the changing nature of relationships in our times. A surprising story about empathy and the unusual ways one person can help another through hardship, her book offers a moving and provocative portrait of the way we live now.”

2. Or What You Will, by Jo Walton

VERDICT from my 5 star review:
Unique fantasy love letter to the Renaissance. Luscious!

I so need to read more books by her!

3. Twelfth Night Or What You Will, by William Shakespeare

Jo Walton’s book got its title from this play, so the link was obvious.
A fun play that I read in 2012. Alas I didn’t review it. The disguise and quidproquo were great!

“Named for the twelfth night after Christmas, the end of the Christmas season, Twelfth Night plays with love and power. The Countess Olivia, a woman with her own household, attracts Duke (or Count) Orsino. Two other would-be suitors are her pretentious steward, Malvolio, and Sir Andrew Aguecheek.
Onto this scene arrive the twins Viola and Sebastian; caught in a shipwreck, each thinks the other has drowned. Viola disguises herself as a male page and enters Orsino’s service. Orsino sends her as his envoy to Olivia—only to have Olivia fall in love with the messenger. The play complicates, then wonderfully untangles, these relationships.”

4. The Lost Love Letters of Heloise and Abelard: Perceptions of Dialogue in Twelfth-Century France, by Constant J. Mews

Again, read in 2014, but not reviewed. This was a fabulous presentation of Héloïse’s and Abélard’s early love letters. Text and explanation. Loved it! If you love the Middle-Ages, you really need to read this one.

“This book examines a medieval text long neglected by most scholars. The Lost Love Letters of Heloise and Abelard looks at the earlier correspondence between these two famous individuals, revealing the emotions and intimate exchanges that occurred between them. The perspectives presented here are very different from the view related by Abelard in his “History of My Calamities,” an account which provoked a much more famous exchange of letters between Heloise and Abelard after they had both entered religious life.
Offering a full translation of the love letters along with a copy of the actual Latin text, Mews provides an in-depth analysis of the debate concerning the authenticity of the letters and look at the way in which the relationship between Heloise and Abelard has been perceived over the centuries. He also explores the political, literary, and religious contexts in which the two figures conducted their affair and offers new insights into Heloise as an astonishingly gifted writer, whose literary gifts were ultimately frustrated by the course of her relationship with her teacher.”

5. The Lost Spells, by Robert MacFarlane

My short Goodreads review:
This is a gorgeous book, with wonderful little poems, containing lots of plays on sounds, and fabulous illustrations. All about nature, birds, fox, etc. Really a gem.

Again, an author I really want to read more

6. The History of English Spelling, by Christopher Upward & George Davidson

For once, a book that’s on my TBR. I love books about languages.

The History of English Spelling reveals the history of Modern English spelling, tracing its origins and development from Old English up to the present day.
Includes a wealth of information and data on English spelling not available anywhere else. Includes detailed coverage of the contributions from French, Latin, Greek – and the many other languages – to our current orthography Serves as a companion volume to Geoffrey Hughes’s A History of English Words in the same series.” 

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
IF YOU HAVE CREATED A CHAIN,
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR LINK IN A COMMENT

Recap: 20 Books of Summer 2020

20 books of summer

Once again, 746books.com organized a special challenge:

20 Books of Summer
June 1-August 31

Summer is already over so it’s time to see how it went for this challenge.

I’m happy with the amount of books I read:
I reached 20 books on July 28, and ended up reading 28 books.
These were not necessarily the 20 I had lined up, I had to adjust to urgent books coming my way for review.
Unfortunately, I only reviewed 6 of these.

And I was planning to connect with participants of this challenge, which I didn’t do much at all, by lack of time.

Out of these 28, 15 books were in print, and 13 in audio (6 of these were Bible books)
12 were mysteries/thrillers

Books I especially liked?:
scratch that, there are too many!!

I will just highlight four books that were different, types of revelations:

  Or What You Will If You Cross the River

Or What You Will:
An amazing author, totally new to me.
Great structure, so many references
VERDICT: Unique fantasy love letter to the Renaissance. Luscious!
See my review, with excerpts

If You Cross The River:
I got this in 2019, why did I wait so long to read it?
Incredible writing. I devoured it in no time

  Migrations Killer Come Back to Me

Migrations:
wow, certainly one of my favorites of the year so far.
VERDICT: Both beautiful and heart-wrenching. And of course, a must for all birders.
See my review, with pictures and data

Killer, Come Back to Me
BIG revelation, I didn’t even know he had written crime fiction. Did you?
And he is so so good at it!

So here is the file with my 28 books.

Did you participate?
What was your favorite book this Summer?

2020: June wrap-up

JUNE 2020 WRAP-UP

I had the impression I had read A LOT this past month. 11 books is not bad, but it’s actually less than last month. Less pages as well, though much more time with audiobooks!
Though actually, I have read more pages than that, as I am reading several books along with different students or groups. It should work well for my July and August stats!

Two Sundays ago, we finally were able to go back to Church (last time was March 11). Our church being physically so small, we can only receive 12 people at a time, to respect social distanciation. And obviously all with masks, including the 3 members of the choir and the priest. Still, some families are spooked. So we are even less than our maximum number. It looks a bit weird to be so few and all masked, but it’s good to receive the Sacraments again.

This past month, I have set up something I wanted to do for a while: an online book club where we will read and discuss books in French. The book was chose in tandem with Lory @ The Emerald City.  Our first book is Complètement cramé, by Gilles Legardinier. We use Discord.
So if you read and write French (we will ignore mistakes), let us know if you are interested in our Club de livres français. NB: You won’t have many pages to read per day.

Also, as many of you know, Thyme for Tea is again organizing Paris in July. If you are participating or considering doing so, I have 2 awesome books for you (or even if you don’t participate in that event!), with free review copies: one on Marie Antoinette, and one novel set in Provence.

📚 So here are the titles I read in June:

11 books:
6 in print 
with 1,428 pages, an average of 47 pages/day
5 in audio
= 31H45
, an average of 1H03 minutes

5 in literary fiction:

  1. Inhabitation, by Teru Miyamoto – ebook, received for review
  2. Or What You Will, by Jo Walton – received for review
  3. And the Earth Will Sit on the Moon, by Nikolai Gogol – ebook, received for review
  4. If You Cross the River, by Geneviève Damas – ebook, received for review
  5. Migrations, by Charlotte McConaghy – audio, received for review

3 in mystery:

  1. Un crime en Hollande, by Georges Simenon – ebook, read along with a French student
  2. Au rendez-vous des Terres-Neuvas, by Georges Simenon – ebook, read along with a French student
  3. Luca, by Franck Thilliez – French audiobook

3 in nonfiction:

  1. Berezina, by Sylvain Tesson – ebook
  2. The Book of Judges (Bible) – audiobook
  3. The Book of Ruth (Bible) – audiobook

MY FAVORITE BOOKS IN JUNE

Again, I cannot limit myself to two this month, it’s already hard to pick only three:

  Or What You Will If You Cross the River

Migrations

I’ll review Migrations near the end of July, as it’s going to be released on August 4. It’s an amazing book.

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 33/50 (from October 2019-until September 2024)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 9 books read

Total of books read in 2020 = 60/110
Number of books added to my TBR this past month= 29

OTHER BOOKS I REVIEWED IN JUNE

Three Hours in Paris A Hundred Million Years and a Day The Mirror and the Light

The Challenging Riddle Book for Kids Dinosaurs

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

And we have 2 books available for reviews on France Book Tours

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Three Hours in Paris

click on the cover to access my review 

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

Sunday Post #31

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

That Artsy Reader Girl
please go visit

TOP COMMENTERS 

Davida at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog
Karen at The Simply Blog
Karen at Booker Talk
Deb at Readerbuzz

please go and visit them,
they have great book blogs

BLOG MILESTONES 

2,195 posts
over 5,290 followers
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Come back tomorrow
to see the books I plan to read in July


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How was YOUR month of June?

2019-Monthly-Wrap-Up-Round-Up_300

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!