Six degrees of separation: from end to beginning

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from end to beginning
or from end to hand!

Time for another quirky variation on this meme.
The book we are starting from speaks about an end, and my final degree evokes a beginning, and oh, there’s end in the first book and hand in the last one, how fun!

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month).

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title (or in the subtitle) offered and find another title with that word in it – see the titles below the images to fully understand, as often the word could be in the second part of the title
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Click on the covers 
links will send you to my review or to the relevant page

the end of the affair

This is the book we are supposed to start from.
I read it ten years ago, but was not wowed by it.

“‘This is a record of hate far more than of love,’ writes Maurice Bendrix in the opening passages of The End of the Affair, and it is a strange hate indeed that compels him to set down the retrospective account of his adulterous affair with Sarah Miles.
Now, a year after Sarah’s death, Bendrix seeks to exorcise the persistence of his passion by retracing its course from obsessive love to love-hate. At first, he believes he hates Sarah and her husband, Henry. Yet as he delves deeper into his emotional outlook, Bendrix’s hatred shifts to the God he feels has broken his life, but whose existence at last comes to recognize. ”

The End of Days The Final Days of Abbot Montrose

  Leave No Trace french leave  

  The Hands On French Cookbook  In Good Hands  

Click on the covers to read my review
or the relevant page

1.  The End of Days, by Jenny Erpenbeck

VERDICT: Great piece of literature reflecting on life circumstances and how a small detail could change everything. Illustrated with a unique original structure and writing style. Perfect if you enjoy trying something different.

2. The Final Days of Abbot Montrose, by Sven Elvestad

VERDICT:  A clever plot symbolizing different layers of the Norwegian society of early 20th century. A nice glimpse into the impressive work of Sven Elvestad, aka Stein Riverton.

3. Leave no Trace: The Final Moments of Florence W. Aldridge, by Tanya Anne Crosby

This is actually a novel I translated into French. Great plot and characters!

“Less than 48 hours.
That’s how long Florence W. Aldridge has to live.
Every event in a person’s life is connected. The state of our lives, at any given time, is the sum of everything we have done and everywhere we have been. Our next decision determines, not merely where our lives end, but who we become along the way. How far can one lost woman go to redeem herself by the time the clock stops ticking?
These are the final moments of Florence W. Aldridge…”

4. French Leave, by Anna Gavalda

A nice and quick read:

“Simon, Garance and Lola flee a family wedding that promises to be dull to visit their younger brother, Vincent, who is working as a guide at a château in the heart of the charming Tours countryside. For a few hours, they forget about kids, spouses, work and the many demands adulthood makes upon them and lose themselves in a day of laughter, teasing, and memories. As simply and as spontaneously as the adventure began, it ends. All four return to their everyday lives, carrying with them the magic of their brief reunion. They are stronger now, and happier, for having rediscovered the ties that bind them.”

5. The Hands On French French Cookbook: Connect With French Through Simple, Healthy Cooking, by Elisabeth de Châtillon

VERDICT: The most yummy book I have read this year. Cook and learn French at the same time!

6. In Good Hands: The Keeping of a Family Farm, by Charles Fish

Exceptionally, this is a book I haven’t read yet. It’s been on my TBR for two years, I have the feeling I would really enjoy it. 

In 1836, Henry Lester moved his family from the Vermont hills to better land on the valley floor north of Rutland, beginning a saga of six generations on a farm, which this book portrays and explores with an affectionate but critical eye. What gives the book its distinctive charm is its vivid evocation of a way of life: the beloved grandmother keeping house both as a shelter and as a temple of the spirit; the uncles sowing and harvesting, raising and slaughtering; the author, as a small boy, working with the men, fishing and hunting, and, later, reflecting on the issues of pleasure and work, freedom and community.”

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
IF YOU HAVE CREATED A CHAIN,
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR LINK IN A COMMENT

IFFP 2015 shadow panel winner

IFFP Shadow iffp2015logo

  •  Invite 11 book bloggers from the US, UK, India, Australia, and France
  • Serve them the 15 books longlisted for the IFFP 2015
  • let them munch on them for a month, until they decide which 6 novels are delightful to their reading palate
  • let them argue and discuss through a week of numerous email exchanges
  • finally have them vote

and the winner of the year is…:

The End of Days

 

The End of Days
(Aller Tage Abend)
by Jenny Erpenbeck,
tr. Susan Bernofsky

Hardcover, 256 pages
Published November 27th 2014
by New Directions Publishing Corporation

ISBN: 978-0811221924

Literary awards:
Deutscher Buchpreis Nominee for Longlist (2012), Joseph-Breitenbach-Preis (2013)

***

A worthy runner-up was Zone, by Mathias Énard, which I did not manage to finish myself, even though it is originally a French novel…

 Read my review here
Read reviews by the other shadow panelists
My final verdict for this title was:

Great piece of literature reflecting on life circumstances and how a small detail could change everything. Illustrated with a unique original structure and writing style. Perfect if you enjoy trying something different.

Tonight, the official IFFP winner will be announced. As this book is part of the official short-list, it may indeed be the official winner.

The IFFP Shadow Panel has been a very interesting experience. It was great sharing with others reading the same books.
Also, I was even more able to appreciate the benefits of my local library and our library network. So many others complained of not finding the books: all the ones I wanted to read I got from my library, and on time, except one!
I discovered 3 amazing authors (Bannerhed, Erpenbeck and Ismailov, whom I may not have heard about otherwise). I repeat that, even if it is not our winner Bannerhed’s book is so far my favorite book read this year.

BUT at the same time, I started and DNFed a good number of books. Seeing the huge number of titles on my TBR, and in there books my authors I enjoy very much on a regular basis, it did feel like a waste of time. Plus I had so many other books already scheduled for review when  signed up, so there was a lot of pressure.

So I am not sure I will participate again next year. The main thing will be not to sign up for scheduled review in May, and see then if the longlist can be potentially interesting. The American equivalent version of this award is very good too, but the longlist is way too long to commit myself to it. Or I may do something with their shortlist. We’ll see, stay tuned!

 

HAVE YOU READ ANY OF IFFP BOOKS?
WHICH ONE WOULD HAVE BEEN YOUR WINNER?

 

IFFP 2015 review: The End Of Days

IFFP Shadow iffp2015logo

 

The End Of Days

The End of Days

 

The End of Days
(Aller Tage Abend)
by Jenny Erpenbeck,
tr. Susan Bernofsky

Hardcover, 256 pages
Published November 27th 2014
by New Directions Publishing Corporation

ISBN: 9780811221924

Literary awards:
Deutscher Buchpreis Nominee for Longlist (2012), Joseph-Breitenbach-Preis (2013)

 

 

This book counts for the following Reading Challenges:

 New Authors 2015   2015 Translation

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

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The IFFP Shadow Panel is giving me great opportunities to read books I may not even have heard about. I’m really glad I discovered Jenny Erpenbeck with The End of Days, translated from the German. It offers an interesting structure and has a great writing style as well.
Click to continue reading