Japanese Literature Challenge 14

JAPANESE LITERATURE CHALLENGE 14Japanese Literature Challenge 14 #JapaneseLitChallenge14   #JapaneseLiterature

Thanks to DolceBelleza (@bellezzamjs) who has been organizing this challenge for many years! This is my 6th participation.
Click on the logo to read more about it, and here to see reviews of books read.

The Challenge runs January-March 2021. I’m going to try to read 3 books each month, so that’s a total of 9 books.

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Here is my TBR for this event (my recap will be updated at the end of this post):

📚 Books on my physical shelf:

1. The Sound of Waves (1954), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
2. N.P. (1990), by Banana Yoshimoto (trans. by Ann Sherif)
3. Some Prefer Nettles (1928),  by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Edward G. Seidensticker)

📚 For my Classics Club list (besides # 1 and 3 above):

4. Kusamakura (1906), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
5. To the Spring Equinox and Beyond (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Kingo Ochiai and Sanford M. Goldstein)
6. The Miner (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Jay Rubin)
7. Devils in Daylight (1918), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by J. Keith Vincent)
8. In Praise of Shadows (1933), by Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, Edward G. Seidensticker (Translator), Thomas J. Harper (Translator),
9. A Cat, a Man, and Two Women (1936), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Paul McCarthy)

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RECAP FOR MARCH 31

So here are the books I managed to read:

1. The Sound of Waves (1954), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Meredith Weatherby),
finished on 1/16/21

CLICK ON THE BEAUTIFUL LOGO TO JOIN!
WHICH OTHER BOOKS WOULD YOU ENCOURAGE ME
TO READ FOR THIS CHALLENGE?

Book review: Inhabitation

Inhabitation

Inhabitation,
by Teru Miyamoto
Translated by Roger K. Thomas
Counterpoint Press
7/9/2019
春の夢 first published in 1984
320 pages
Japanese Literature

Goodreads

Buy the book

World literature is getting more and more one of my favorite genres, especially coming from Japan. I enjoy participating every year in the Japanese Literature Challenge, and I managed to read 8 books in  the 13th edition of the challenge. Alas, there were many more I had planned to tackle. So I’m glad I finally got to read Inhabitation, by Teru Miyamoto, considered to be among Japan’s most widely read living authors. The movie Shoplifters is based on one of his novels. Kore-eda,  the director of Shoplifters, also made the movie Maborosi, based on a book by Teru Miyamoto. Click to continue reading

Book review: The Ten Loves of Nishino

The Ten Loves of Nishino

The Ten Loves of Nishino,
by Hiromi Kawakami
ニシノユキヒコの恋と冒険
was first published in 2003
Translated by
Allison Markin Powell
Europa Editions
6/4/2019
Japanese Literature
240 pages

Goodreads

Buy the book

Hiromi Kawakami has written several noticeable novels, so I decided to try The Ten Loves of Mr Nishino.
I read it for Japanese Literature Challenge 13
Click to continue reading