Six degrees of separation: From Versailles to hacking

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Versailles to hacking!

I’m glad to be back for this fun exercise! And this month is a wild card, we are supposed to start with the last book of our last chain!
Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started in the past at Versailles and ended up in the modern world of hackers!
I love this adventure, always full of surprises.

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

After the covers, you can find the links to my reviews or to the title on Goodreads:

  Before Versailles the night before  

  if on a winter's night Light to Enlighten My Darkness

     How the Light Gets In The Innovators

1. Before Versailles
A historical novel about Louis XIV.
My verdict:
“The characters sounded true to life, the topic was well researched, the descriptions beautiful.”

2. The Night Before
I find Wendy Walker to be a strong author, and I’m looking forward to reading more books by her. I have read three so far.
VERDICT for this one: Strong psychological thriller, with nice twists and complex characters.

3. If on a Winter‘s Night a Traveler
If you want to read something original, this one is for you: totally different, unique, and superb writing.

4. A Light to Enlighten the Darkness: Daily Readings for Meditation during the Winter Season
Well, I can’t resist the temptation to feature my own book! This is an anthology, with a short text on the theme of light, for those dark days of the winter season. I have selected texts by Medieval authors, men and women. The introduction is mine.

5. How the Light Gets In
With two of its books containing the word light, I have to feature one of my most favorite series of all times: the Gamache series by Louise Penny.
If you don’t know it though, I highly recommend you start with volume 1, Still Life, as the evolution of the characters and their relationships is so important throughout the 15 volumes so far.
Well, 14 to be exact, but I have already read and reviewed book 15, that will come out end of August. My review will then be featured in Criminal Element.

6. The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution
This was so fascinating!
VERDICTSuperb audiobook, the best nonfiction I have listened to this year [that was in 2014]. A brilliant author and a just as brilliant narrator combine their kills to present the roots of our current digital world, and the men and women who worked together to give us what we have today.

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Visit other chains here

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
DID YOU PLAY
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?

 

The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #20

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #20

Time for a new spin!

At your blog, before next Monday, Monday 22, create a post to list your choice of any twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

This is your Spin List. You have to read one of these twenty books by the end of the year. Try to challenge yourself. For example, you could list five Classics Club books you are dreading/hesitant to read, five you can’t WAIT to read, five you are neutral about, and five free choice (favorite author, re-reads, ancients — whatever you choose.)

On Monday 22nd April, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List by 31st May, 2019.

So here are my 20 books:

  1. The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner
  2. Tender is the Night, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  3. Travels With Charley, by John Steinbeck
  4. The Baron in the Trees, by Italo Calvino
  5. Solaris, by Stanislas Lem
  6. Childhood’s End, by Arthur C. Clarke
  7. Fantômas, by Marcel Allain
  8. To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf
  9. A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  10. Satantango, by Laszlo Krasznahorkai
  11. We, by Yevgeny Zamyatin
  12. Love in the Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  13. Le dictionnaires des idées reçues, by Gustave Flaubert
  14. The Castle of Otranto, by Horace Walpole
  15. North and South, by Elizabeth Gaskell
  16. Oblomov, by Ivan Goncharov
  17. Xingu, by Edith Wharton
  18. Confusion, by Stefan Zweig
  19. The Dream  of the Red Chamber, by Cao Xueqin
  20. Kusamakura, by Natsume Soseki

COME BACK ON APRIL 22
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ SOON.
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

MY FULL LIST IS HERE

 

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Nonfiction November 2018: New on my TBR

Nonfiction-November-2018-1-300x300

#NonficNov

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule

As every year, a bunch of really cool bloggers are co-hosting Nonfiction November.

Here is the topic for week 5:

NEW TO MY TBR

Hosted by Dewing Dewey

It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books!
Which ones have made it onto your TBR?
Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book

Here are the nonfiction books (19!!) I discovered this month and have added to my TBR, with the name of the blogger I found it in – some may not be participants in Nonfiction November:

Found in 13 book blogs:
– by alphabetical order of the blog name.
If the book was found on that blog, the link goes directly to it.
If the book was found in a comment made by that blogger on my site, the link lands on their homepage.

Bookgirl’s Nightstand:
How to Travel without Seeing: Dispatches from the New Latin America, by  Andrés Neuman

BooksPlease:
Jacob’s Room is Full of Books: A Year of Reading, by Susan Hill

Brona’s Books:
Books that Saved My Life: Reading for Wisdom, Solace and Pleasure, bMichael McGirr

Buried in Print:
Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting and Living with Booksby Michael Dirda

My French Quest: Literary France:
The Making of a Cultureby Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson

NancyElin:
Psychanalyse de Victor Hugo, by Baudouin Charles

Reading With Jade: – bravo to her, 3 books from her blog!
Why I Am Not Going to Buy a Computerby  Wendell Berry
Britain by the Book: A Curious Tour of Our Literary Landscape, by Oliver Tearle
The Joy of Forest Bathing: The Mysterious Japanese Art of Shinrin-Yoku, by Melanie Choukas-Bradley

The Content Reader:
The Uses of Literatureby Italo Calvino

The Emerald City:
A Primer for Poets and Readers of Poetryby Gregory Orr

The Great Morrisson Migration:
The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, by Deborah Blum

The Literary Saloon:
The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World, by Maya Jasanoff

Typings:
Bookshops: A Reader’s History, by Jorge Carrión
The Courage to Createby Rollo May

What’s Nonfiction?:
The Lady in the Cellar: Murder, Scandal and Insanity in Victorian Bloomsbury, by Sinclair McKay

Found in an ad on my browser:
because of my review of Margalit Fox’s book on Conan Doyle!:
Talking Hands: What Sign Language Reveals about the Mind, by Margalit Fox

Found in Edelweiss catalogue:
Talk to Me: How Voice Computing Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Think, by James Vlahos

Found on Book Page:
Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live, by Rob Dunn

It was actually a good exercise to keep track of the source. I had started doing this a bit on Goodreads, adding it as a comment, I need to do this more.

Thanks to all my fellow book bloggers who gave me the idea to read the books above listed.

WHAT GREAT NONFICTION BOOK
HAVE YOU RECENTLY ADDED TO YOUR TBR?

 

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