Posts tagged ‘Italo Calvino’

The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #15

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #15

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

Time for a new spin!

At your blog, before next Friday, March 10th, create a post to list your choice of any twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

This is your Spin List. You have to read one of these twenty books in March & April. (Details follow.) Try to challenge yourself. For example, you could list five Classics Club books you are dreading/hesitant to read, five you can’t WAIT to read, five you are neutral about, and five free choice (favorite author, re-reads, ancients — whatever you choose.)

On Friday, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List, by May 1, 2017. We’ll check in here in May to see who made it the whole way and finished their spin book!

So here are my 20 books:

  1. The Poisoned Crown by Maurice Druon
  2. Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers
  3. The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins
  4. Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc
  5. The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe
  6. The Baron in the Trees, by Italo Calvino
  7. Solaris, by Stanislas Lem
  8. Childhood’s End, by Arthur C. Clarke
  9. Fantômas, by Marcel Allain
  10. A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  11. Charlotte’s Web, by E. B. White
  12. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
  13. My Cousin Rachel, by Daphne du Maurier
  14. The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner
  15. Tender is the Night, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  16. Travels With Charley, by John Steinbeck
  17. A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway
  18. To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf
  19. Oblomov, by Ivan Goncharov
  20. Confusion, by Stefan Zweig

COME BACK ON MARCH 10
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ SOON

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The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #14

classicsclub

Women's Classic
#theclassicsclub

#ccwomenclassics

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #14

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

I finally managed my subscriptions, so I can now know when a new spin is posted!

Here is what was announced:

At your blog, by next Monday, October 3, list your choice of any twenty books you’ve left to read from your Classics Club list — in a separate post.

This is your Spin List. You have to read one of these twenty books in October & November. So, try to challenge yourself. For example, you could list five Classics Club books you are dreading/hesitant to read, five you can’t WAIT to read, five you are neutral about, and five free choice (favorite author, rereads, ancients — whatever you choose.)

Next Monday, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List, by December 1, 2016. We’ll have a check in here in December, to see who made it the whole way and finished the spin book.

So here are my 20 books, not too much extra challenge, these are all books I can’t wait to read!!

  1. A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
  2. Death Comes for the Archbishop, by Willa Cather
  3. The Poisoned Crown by Maurice Druon
  4. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith
  5. The Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan
  6. The Phantom of the Opera, by Gaston Leroux
  7. Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K. Jerome
  8. Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers
  9. The Hound of the Baskervilles, Arthur Conan Doyle
  10. The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins
  11. Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc
  12. The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe
  13. Moderato Cantabile, by Marguerite Duras
  14. The Baron in the Trees, by Italo Calvino
  15. Solaris, by Stanislas Lem
  16. Childhood’s End, by Arthur C. Clarke
  17. Fantômas, by Marcel Allain
  18. A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  19. Charlotte’s Web, by E. B. White
  20. The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury

COME BACK ON OCTOBER 3
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ

 

 

(2012) #44 review: Invisible Cities

Invisible Cities

by

Italo CALVINO

Translated by William Weaver

165 pages

Published  in 1972 as Le città invisibili

This book counts for the following Reading Challenges:

        

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

I discovered Italo Calvino last May, when I read If On A Winter’s Night A Traveler, and I had to try something else: I love his smart very literary style.

Invisible Cities can also be confusing for some readers, but it is worth the effort of diving in, plus this is a rather short book. Each chapter consists in imaginary descriptions of cities by Marco Polo as he meets Kublai Khan of China, and does not want to reveal him that his kingdom is diminishing. The titles of the chapters evolve, some are repeated, but I tried in vain to discern a pattern, though I’m sure there is one. There is no story, no plot. It sounds almost more like poetry than prose. The descriptions are very lyric, and give you a good feel of each city.

If you are ready for some reading in unknown territory, you should definitely try Italo Calvino.

QUOTATION

The foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.
P.29

WHAT IS IT ABOUT

Imaginary conversations between Marco Polo and his host, the Chinese ruler Kublai Khan, conjure up cities of magical times. “Of all tasks, describing the contents of a book is the most difficult and in the case of a marvelous invention like Invisible Cities, perfectly irrelevant” (Gore Vidal) [Goodreads]

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 Italo Calvino was born in Cuba and grew up in Italy. He was a journalist and writer of short stories and novels. His best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy (1952-1959), the Cosmicomics collection of short stories (1965), and the novels Invisible Cities (1972) and If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler (1979).

His style is not easily classified; much of his writing has an air of the fantastic reminiscent of fairy tales (Our Ancestors, Cosmicomics), although sometimes his writing is more “realistic” and in the scenic mode of observation (Difficult Loves, for example). Some of his writing has been called postmodern, reflecting on literature and the act of reading, while some has been labeled magical realist, others fables, others simply “modern”. He wrote: “My working method has more often than not involved the subtraction of weight. I have tried to remove weight, sometimes from people, sometimes from heavenly bodies, sometimes from cities; above all I have tried to remove weight from the structure of stories and from language.“[goodreads]

REVIEWS BY OTHER BOOK BLOGGERS

Rule The Waves
Park Benches And Book Ends

HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK YET?
WHICH CALVINO’S BOOK IS YOUR FAVORITE?
DO YOU FEEL LIKE READING THIS BOOK?
SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS  IN A COMMENT PLEASE

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