Nonfiction November 2019: Book Pairings

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#nonficnov

Book Pairings

hosted by Sarah’s Book Shelves

This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title.
It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!”
or just two titles that you think would go well together.
Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history
by reading a nonfiction version of the story.

Today, I’m offering you 3 novels paired with 3 nonfiction books I read this year

Click on the covers to get more details

BOOK PAIRING #1

POND

Walden The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Walden is a wonderful narrative of the time Henry David Thoreau spent alone in a secluded cabin at Walden Pond. I so enjoyed all the nature descriptions.
In a totally different style, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, is also about a pond, and where it can lead you to…

BOOK PAIRING #2

TRAVELS

 Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes Canterbury tales

Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes is the narrative of the 12 days Robert Louis Stevenson traveled with his donkey Modestine in this very isolated area of France, marked by fierce fights between Roman Catholics and Protestants. I really enjoyed his humor at describing the mentality of the area and the people he met.
The Canterbury Tales is about travels and narratives, and religion,and it contains also very funny passages.

BOOK PAIRING #3

TECHNOLOGY

 Talk to me I Robot

Talk to Me: How Voice Computing Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Think is an extremely well-documented and up-to-date research, showing where civilization is heading to, through current technological advances. It’s about how we interact with technology, computers, AI, and robots.
The most powerful novel I have read about the connection between humans and robots is definitely I, Robot.
Please skip the horrible movie, which really has nothing to do with the book.

HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE?
WOULD YOU HAVE ANOTHER
BOOK PAIRING RELATED TO TRAVELS OR TECHNOLOGY?

Nonfiction November: My Year 2019 in Nonfiction

Nonficnov2019

#NonficNov

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As every year, a bunch of really cool bloggers are co-hosting Nonfiction November.

Here is the topic for Week 1 (Oct. 28 to Nov. 1):

YOUR YEAR IN NONFICTION

Hosted by Julz of Julz Reads
Take a look back at your year of nonfiction and reflect on the following questions:
What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?
Do you have a particular topic you’ve been attracted to more this year?
What nonfiction book have you recommended the most?
What are you hoping to get out of participating in Nonfiction November?

Here is the recap of the nonfiction I have read (the links will send you to my review when it’s posted).
So far, I have read or listened to 17 nonfiction, nice, compared to only 11 last year. And I plan to read at least 3 more before the end of the year.

Here are the titles:

Biographies/Memoirs:

  1. The Years, by Annie Ernaux
  2. Walden, by Henry David Thoreau – audio, classic

About travels:

  1. Are We French Yet?, by Keith Van Sickle
  2. Travels with Charley, by John Steinbeck – audio, classic
  3. The American Dream? A Journey on Route 66, by Shing Yin Khor
    graphic “novel”
  4. Travels with a Donkey, by Robert Louis Stevenson – audio, classic

About technology:

  1. Talk to Me: How Voice Computing Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Think, by James Vlahos

About language/books:

  1. Dictionnaire des idées reçues, by Gustave Flaubert – audio, classic
  2. Book Love, by Debbie Tunggraphic “novel”

Other:

  1. Oh, the Meetings You’ll Go To!: A Parody, by Dr. Suits – graphic “novel”
  2. Secret Agent Brainteasers: More Than 100 Codebreaking Puzzles Inspired by Britain’s Espionage Masterminds, by Sinclair McKay

Orthodox spirituality:

  1. Prayers by the Lake, by Bishop Nikolai Velimirovich
  2. Earthen Vessels: The Practice of Personal Prayer According to the Patristic Tradition, by Gabriel Bunge
  3. Poustinia: Encountering God in Silence, Solitude and Prayer, by Catherine de Hueck Doherty
  4. If You Love Me: Serving Christ and the Church in Spirit and Truth, by Matthew the Poor
  5. Elder Leonid of Optina, by Fr. Clement Sederholm
  6. Alexander Schmorell: Saint of the German Resistance, by Elena Perekrestov

I actually also reviewed a few cookbooks, but I don’t feel like it counts here.

***

What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?

The YearsThis is really hard,
there are so many on this list I loved a lot!

What nonfiction book
have you recommended the most?
Talk to me

Do you have a particular topic
you’ve been attracted to more this year?
Apart from books related to Eastern Orthodoxy, I notice a lot of travels!

What are you hoping to get out
of participating in Nonfiction November?
As usual, to get acquainted with more nonfiction readers
and good titles unknown to me.

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE NONFICTION THIS YEAR?

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The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #21

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#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2019-2024

The Classics Spin #21

Time for a new spin!

At your blog, before next Monday, Monday 23, create a post to list your choice of any twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

This is your Spin List. You have to read one of these twenty books by the end of the year. Try to challenge yourself. For example, you could list five Classics Club books you are dreading/hesitant to read, five you can’t WAIT to read, five you are neutral about, and five free choice (favorite author, re-reads, ancients — whatever you choose.)

On Monday September 23, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List by October 21, 2019.

I have just started my 2nd list of 50 classics, so I’m just picking the 20 oldest books on my list.
Some are quite long, like #1, some short:

1 Laurence Sterne The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1767)
2 Xavier de Maistre Voyage Autour de Ma Chambre (1794)
3 Edgar Allan Poe The Masque of the Red Death (1842)
4 Henry David Thoreau Civil Disobedience (1849)
5 Nikolai Leskov On the Edge of the World (1875)
6 Robert Louis Stevenson Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes (1879)
7 Fergus Hume The Mystery of a Hansom Cab (1886)
8 Edmond Rostand Cyrano de Bergerac (1897) = reread
9 Machado de Assi Dom Casmurro (1899)
10 Marcel Proust Days of Reading (1905)
11 Natsume Soseki Kusamakura (1906)
12 Kakuzo Okakura The Book of Tea (1906)
13 Natsume Soseki Sanshirō (1908)
14 Natsume Soseki The Miner (1908)
15 Robert Walser Jakob von Gunten (1909)
16 Natsume Soseki To the Spring Equinox and Beyond (1910)
17 Natsume Soseki The Gate (1910)
18 Marie Belloc Lowndes The Lodger (1913)
19 Christopher Morley Parnassus on Wheels (1917)
20 Jun’ichiro Tanizaki Devils in Daylight (1918)

COME BACK ON SEPTEMBER 23
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ SOON.
HOW MANY HAVE YOU READ?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

MY FULL LIST IS HERE

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