Book review: How Do You Live?

How Do You Live

How Do You Live?
by Yoshino Genzaburo
Translated from the Japanese
by Bruno Navasky

 Algonquin Young Readers
10/26/2021
First published as 君たちはどう生きるか
in 1937
288 pages
Fiction / Middle Grade

Goodreads

Buy the book on my Bookshop

This is my second book for the Japanese Literature Challenge 15.
Like Neil Gaiman (as he explains in the introduction), I decided to read this classic Japanese middle grade book, because Miyazaki decided to come out of retirement to make an anime on it, his favorite children’s book. I wanted to read How Do You Live? before watching the movie.
Actually as Miyazaki does everything by hand, it’s going to take a while to finish. Will it be out in 2023? It could also take much longer.
How Do You Live? was written in 1937 by a Japanese author, so this book has not much in common with contemporary American middle grade books.

Click to continue reading

Six degrees of separation: from lottery to tides

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
from lottery to tides

Time for another quirky variation on this meme.

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month).

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title (or in the subtitle) offered and find another title with that word in it – see the titles below the images to fully understand, as often the word could be in the second part of the title
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Click on the covers 
links will send you to my review or to the relevant Goodreads page

  the-lottery  dining with proust

  Joie de vivre  The Secret World of Arrietty

  The World Between Two Covers  The House Between Tides

 

1.  The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson

For once, I have read the first book we are supposed to start with.

VERDICT from my review:
Tense writing, most efficient for a totally unexpected outcome.

(You can read my full review by clicking on the book cover)

2. Dining with Marcel Proust: A Practical Guide to French Cuisine of the Belle Epoque, by Shirley King

As I haven’t read any other book with the word “lottery” in it, I couldn’t follow my usual quirky rules. I debated and finally decided to go with another Shirley for the author of the second book.

This book is so cool! It’s about all the food and dishes mentioned in Proust, in In Search of Lost Time of course, but other books as well.

3. Joie de Vivre: Secrets of Wining, Dining, and Romancing Like the French, by Harriet Welty Rochefort

I haven’t yet read this one, it has been collecting dust for a while on my French shelf. Not sure why, as it does look so good.

“An engaging exploration of the style that permeates all things French—perfect for anyone looking to achieve that classic French flair”

4. The Secret World of Arrietty, by Hayao Miyazaki

Sad, but gorgeous art, so detailed, so good with nature, colors. Actually a Film Comic Adaptation of the amazing Hayao Miyazaki (Studio Ghibli)

“Arrietty isn’t your ordinary fourteen-year-old girl—she small enough to make her home under the floorboards of a typical house, “borrowing” what she and her family needs from the giants in whose shadows they live. A young boy named Sho befriends Arrietty, but when adults discover the Borrowers, Arrietty and Sho must work together to save her family.”

5. The World Between Two Covers, by Ann Morgan

VERDICT from my review:
Superb fresco on world literature today. A must have reference for all interested in literature and cultural diversity. Leave the familiar, open yourself to new horizons through books.

6. The House Between Tides, by Sarah Maine

VERDICT from my review:
A very enjoyable atmospheric novel, spanning over a few generations, rich in landscape descriptions and suspense, that will delight lovers of Kate Morton’s books.

 

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Six degrees of separation: From Daisy Jones to Japan

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Daisy Jones to Japan

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started with Daisy Jones and ended up in Japan!
Come with me!

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Daisy Jones & the Six  The One And Only Ivan

 To Open One's Heart  Open World

 The Secret World of Arrietty  Ikigai

1. Daisy Jones and the Six
I haven’t read this book and have no intention to do so. I couldn’t find any book on my Goodreads shelf with the first two words, so I had to go with and.

2. The One and Only Ivan
From my review: “Applegate has a knack for writing deep stories full of wisdom, in a very accessible style for middle graders.”

3. To Open One’s Heart
A beautiful short book on the heart in Orthodox spirituality. Unfortunately, I never took the time to review t, so here’s the Goodreads synopsis:
“There are many ways to open one’s heart. The heart is opened in those who love, and yet the heart is injured in those who sorrow. It is a deep well, and he who plumbs its depths can find spiritual wonders. The heart is the locus of the person— emotional, physical, and moral. But over and above all these dimensions, the heart is also the place of spiritual encounter with God.
Since God is constantly inviting each person to open his heart, he also wishes to heal those whose hearts have been bruised or injured by the hardships of life. Drawing freely from the writings of Scripture, the saints, and even Pascal, Michel Evdokimov offers an initiation into this spirituality of the heart born out of the traditions of Orthodox Christianity.”

4. Open World: The Collected Poems 1960-2000
This one has been on my TBR for a while. It looks like these nature poems should talk to my heart.
“His vision is a remarkably consistent one and the same elements recur again and again—rocks, sea, mist, gulls and the natural world.”
Have you read this Scottish poet?

5. The Secret World of Arrietty
Sad, but gorgeous art, so detailed, so good with nature, colors. Totally my cup of tea!It is actually a Film Comic Adaptation, I didn’t even know such a thing existed before I discovered Miyazaki, one of my major 2019 discoveries.

6. Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life
From my review: “Fascinating, about the Japanese concept of ikigai – a reason for living, as the root of happiness. This little book is packed with goodness, lots of great tips on health.”

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?