The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #30

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The Classics Club
2020-2025

The Classics Spin #30

Time for a new spin!

At your blog, before Sunday, June 12, create a post to list your choice of any twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

On Sunday June 12, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List by August 7, 2022.

Here are 20 titles I have selected from my 3rd list of 50 classics.
It might indeed be a challenge, as I made a list not counting any of the 20 books I’m supposed to read for the 20 books of summer challenge.

1 Antal Szerb Journey by Moonlight (1937)
2 Antal Szerb The Pendragon Legend (1934)
3 Charles Williams Descent into Hell (1937)
4 Colette Sido
5 Cornell Woolrich The Bride Wore Black (1940)
6 Daphne du Maurier* Jamaica Inn (1935)
7 Eric Ambler Epitaph for a Spy (1938)
8 Freeman Wills Crofts Inspector French’s Greatest Case (1924)
9 George Orwell Down and Out in Paris and London (1933)
10 Italo Calvino The Baron in the Trees
11 Jean Giono Le chant du monde (1934)
12 Machado de Assi Dom Casmurro (1899)
13 Marcel Allain Fantômas
14 R. C. Sherriff The Hopkins Manuscript (1939)
15 Raymond Chandler The Big Sleep (1939)
16 Rex Stout Fer-de-Lance (1934)
17 Robert Walser Jakob von Gunten (1909)
18 Sinclair Lewis It Can’t Happen Here (1935)
19 Stefan Zweig Confusion (1927)
20 various authors The Floating Admiral (1931)

COME BACK ON MONDAY JUNE 13
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ SOON.
HOW MANY HAVE YOU READ?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

MY FULL LIST IS HERE

Book club February 2022 and Friday Finds

Bookshelf4
Picture from my bookshelves
edited with Pixlr
#Fridayfinds

I’m presenting here the books we shared
at our last block Book Club meeting
– it’s a potluck book club,
meaning each member shares about his/her latest good read.
Awesome for diversity in books, lively conversations,
and your TBR getting suddenly taller!
(synopsis taken from Goodreads.com)

So here are the 8 books we talked about for our January 2022 meeting.

The Brothers Karamazov is a murder mystery, a courtroom drama, and an exploration of erotic rivalry in a series of triangular love affairs involving the “wicked and sentimental” Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov and his three sons―the impulsive and sensual Dmitri; the coldly rational Ivan; and the healthy, red-cheeked young novice Alyosha. Through the gripping events of their story, Dostoevsky portrays the whole of Russian life, is social and spiritual striving, in what was both the golden age and a tragic turning point in Russian culture.

 

 

Rebecca

From my review:
My post has also an awesome list of Q&A on the book.
I dived into it without reading any presentation, and had no idea what kind of water to expect. Wow, what a swim it was! I actually wanted to read over and over again the first chapter, hauntingly beautiful. I even wanted to paint it – it may actually happen one day!
I loved the descriptions of the landscapes, of the house, the sea, the people and their characters, the ambiance, definitely gothic! I felt magnetized by the book and the depth of its characters.At the beginning, the heroin seems rather shallow, too immature and almost two dimensional, but little by little, her character grows and makes for a loving and courageous person.
And the plot was not what I expected. When I finished the book, I re-read right away the first chapters, looking for the clues I had missed. It was an interesting experience.
If you have not read yet this classic, you have to give it a try.

    

With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in I Feel Bad About My Neck, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself.

Nora Ephron returns with her first book since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten.

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The noted singer and actress Kitty Carlisle Hart recounts her eventful life from her childhood in Europe, through Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s, to her life today, offering revealing insights into the many celebrities she has known

 

 

 

58935131 In this searing memoir, Congressman Jamie Raskin tells the story of the forty-five days at the start of 2021 that permanently changed his life–and his family’s–as he confronted the painful loss of his son to suicide, lived through the violent insurrection in our nation’s Capitol, and led the impeachment effort to hold President Trump accountable for inciting the political violence.

 

 

 

23692271. sy475 100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens.
How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations and human rights; to trust money, books and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come?
In Sapiens, Dr Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come?
Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power… and our future.

Agatha Christie's Poirot

After listening to all of Hercule Poirot short stories and novels, I decided to conclude my experience with Agatha Christie Poirot:
The Greatest Detective in the World.
It’s a very interesting volume.
The writing is sometimes a bit dry (hence 4 and not 5 Eiffel towers), but the content is fascinating.
The author recaps all about Hercule Poirot, in each decade.
VERDICT: An essential book for Agatha Christie’s fans.
Click on the cover to read my full review

 

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 HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THOSE?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

2020: April wrap-up

APRIL 2020 WRAP-UP

My introductory paragraph could be a simple copy and paste from last month. We know by now that life will never again be like BEFORE Covid-19.
However I try to go back to my usual blogging, but my teaching and lots of homework preparation and corrections keep me very busy. I have been teaching online for 12 years, so nothing new for me. It’s just that this year I’m preparing students to two different and very demanding exams, that on top of everything, have a new revamping – and one has nothing to do with the virus.
So lots of new classes to prepare. And one book is very fat, so it will take a while…
And suddenly I have four new students.

We still haven’t been able to go back to Church. I dare hope it will be possible in June, but who knows at this point?

The one good thing is that finally Spring is coming more consistently in Illinois, and the garden is already growing!

I have read less books than last month, but more pages. And I’m in the middle of The Mirror and the Light. After listening to Au Soleil Redouté, I’m also reading it, with one of my students. It’s also fairly big. So when I count them in May, that will raise the stats, lol.

📚 So here are the titles I read in April :

Exclusively international, and mostly French!
And 3 books are actually a mix of different genres!!

6 books:
5 in print 
with 1,348 pages, an average of 44 pages/day
1 in audio
= 10H57
, an average of 21 minutes

3 in mystery:

  1. Le chien jaune, by Georges Simenon – ebook, in French, read with one of my students
  2. La nuit du carrefour, by Georges Simenon – ebook, in French, read with one of my students
  3. Au soleil redouté, by Michel Bussi – audiobook, in French

2 in literary fiction:

  1. Summer of Reckoning, by Marion Brunet – received for review
  2. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, by Haruki Murakami – ebook, read with the Murakami Online Book Club

1 in historical fiction:

  1. Wild Dog, by Serge Joncour – received for review

MY FAVORITE BOOKS IN APRIL

  Wild Dog Au soleil redouté

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 26/50 (from October 2019-until September 2024)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 8 books read

Total of books read in 2020 = 37/110
Number of books added to my TBR this past month= 15

OTHER BOOKS I REVIEWED IN APRIL

Besides the books above listed, this month I also reviewed:

  Simple Superfood Soups  100 Large-Print Crossword Puzzles

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Rebecca

click on the cover to access my review 

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

Top 10 books to read in April 2020

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

Caffeinated Reviewer
please go visit

TOP COMMENTERS 

Davida at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog
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please go and visit them,
they have great book blogs

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Come back on Monday
to see the books I plan to read in May


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How was YOUR month of March?

2019-Monthly-Wrap-Up-Round-Up_300

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!