Posts tagged ‘Clink Street Publishing’

Spotlight and guest-post: Addicted to Death

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Addicted to Death

Addicted to Death:
A Food Related Crime Investigation

Following the murder of Benedict and Darcy Blacktail, two eggs savagely beaten to death outside their home by an unknown, fedora wearing assailant brandishing a large metal spoon, Detective Inspector Willie Wortel, carrot and the leading food detective in the police force, is called in to investigate. When the only food sapiens minister in the Government, Professor Perry Partridge, is murdered at the Strawberry Strip Club, run by the young damson Victoria Plum, DI Wortel suspects that the two cases may somehow be linked. As the Head of the Food Related Crime Division, DI Wortel is ably assisted by his human colleague Sergeant Dorothy Knox. But as their investigation begins, four celebrity chefs are sent death threats. It’s a recipe for disaster as the incarcerated evil genius MadCow McBeef is seeking parole; someone appears to have crumbled Mr Bramley’s apples; and there is an anti-GM food protestor on the prowl. And why do Oranges and Lemons think they owe someone five farthings? DI Wortel and his team must find out who is seemingly addicted to death. It will take all efforts – human, fruit and vegetable – to figure this one out.
Purchase from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Addicted-Death-Related-Crime-Investigation-ebook/dp/B010545FEQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1490869221&sr=1-1&keywords=matthew+redford

Matthew RedfordAbout Matthew Redford

Born in 1980, Matthew Redford grew up with his parents and elder brother on a council

estate in Bermondsey, south-east London. He now lives in Longfield, Kent, takes masochistic pleasure in watching his favourite football team snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, is a keen chess player and is planning future food related crime novels. To counterbalance the quirkiness of his crime fiction Redford is an accountant. His unconventional debut crime thriller, Addicted to Death: A Food Related Crime Investigation was published by Clink Street Publishing last summer.

Website – http://www.matthewredford.com/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/matthew_redford

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Matthew Redford

First crime fiction authors read by the author

Firstly I would like to start by thanking for you providing me with this opportunity to write a guest blog for your site.

I’ve been asked to write about the first crime fiction authors I read, and I guess in many ways, the question is seeking to find out whether those authors influenced my writing in any way. I think this is a really interesting question because it not only provides me with the opportunity to think back on those authors who wrote books I enjoyed reading, but it allows me to reflect on what influence they actually had. And as someone who enjoys that reflectiveness, this topic was a delight.

I’m going to pick out three authors who I think are worth mentioning.

The first is Enid Blyton and her ‘Famous Five’ collection. And I recognise as the reader you can’t see this, but just typing the words ‘Famous Five’ has resulted in a big smile on my face for a number of reasons. The main reason being that they are just simply enjoyable, well written stories. They were among the first set of books I read, and importantly, which were read to me by my parents. I don’t think the importance of that latter point can be stressed enough; the importance of spending time with young children reading to them, reading with them.

Now you might be wondering if Enid Blyton is really a crime fiction author but her stories nearly always involved a wrong-doer being stopped. And while reflecting about the Enid Blyton books, the thing which sticks out about them now is their innocence. I like that. The stories flow. They move at a pace. There is a friendship to the group. But there is an underlying innocence. And ginger beer of course.

I guess that was something I wanted to try and capture with my writing. A childlike innocence while still letting the story pack a punch.

That leads me to the next author, Ian Harvey, who wrote the Resnick novels. I am not sure how many of you will be familiar with those books but he is certainly a million miles away from dear old Enid.

Resnick is a tough policeman who keeps order on the streets of Nottingham, while struggling to keep order in his home life. The alcohol flows, the jazz music plays, and the murders rack up. But he always gets his man. Gritty. Real. No punches pulled. And I love the books.

So how can someone like Ian Harvey have been an influence on my style of writing which has affectionately been called ‘quirky’ and ‘bonkers’. Well actually, it was a great influence, because I knew I wanted to write a crime fiction book, but having read something so gritty and true to life as the Resnick novels, I knew I was not going to be able to create something of that style. My writing style is very different and these books helped my realise I needed to find my own voice.

Which leads me to my third author, who you may not immediately think of as a crime fiction author. So let me set the scene and argue my case for this author who I will name in a few moments. Perhaps you can try and guess who it is?

Here is the premises of the story. A young boy is orphaned and forced to live with his two aunts who effectively force him into child labour. They eat him, he lives in squalid conditions and he hardly fed. This is clearly a crime. The young boy is eventually rescued and escapes these awful conditions.

Have you worked it out yet?

It’s of course Roald Dahl and the book is James and the Giant Peach, one of the great crime fiction novels. Okay, so perhaps I am stretching a point but the fact is that there was a crime in the book and the bad guys get their comeuppance in the end.

Clearly Roald Dahl had a massive influence on my writing. He demonstrated that anything is possible and any situation believable.

Which is why I hope you may take some time to read about Food Sapiens, those walking, talking, tax-paying food items who live amongst us. Follow the shenanigans of Detective Inspector Willie Wortel, a carrot, as he leads his team against food related crimes. Check out Addicted to Death or a Christmas cracker, Who Killed the Mince Spy?

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AND YOU MY READERS,
WHO WAS THE FIRST CRIME FICTION AUTHOR
YOU READ?

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Spotlight and guest-post: For the Love of Grace

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For the Love of Grace

Grace Backer had a life full of tragedy. But despite everything, she raised her son, Tom, with her secret intact. Tom is a prodigal child, destined to escape the slums of the East End of London for a better life; circumstances will make him flee his loving mother and their home much sooner than expected. Tom starts a new life in Odessa, Russia, and with the help of new-found friends starts a business. At last, he is finally accepted into a new and loving family, but one which holds its own dark secrets. A chance meeting with the son of a duke of the realm leads to close friendship and a new business partnership. When Tom decides to move his company to London and have his regal new friend run it, the firm thrives. However, not everything is as it seems, and Tom?s* business soon conceals dangerous secrets of its own. Years later, when Tom finally decides to return to London, he is a wanted man, one hunted by the intelligence agencies. If he is finally to be reunited with his beloved mother and his best friend, he must fight to put the past behind him. But keeping secrets is never easy.

 

Purchase from Amazon UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Love-Grace-Andy-Blackman/dp/1911110535/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1472152533&sr=8-1&keywords=andy+blackman+for+the+love+of+grace

Purchase from Barnes & Noble – http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/for-the-love-of-grace-andy-blackman/1124144405?type=eBook

About Andy Blackman

After serving in the British Army for over twenty-five years in the Parachute Regiment, Andy Blackman today lives in Bedworth, Warwickshire and works within in the IT sector. In his spare time he can be found visiting his three daughters and grandchildren.

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GUEST-POST BY

ANDY BLACKMAN

Andy Blackman sharing his thoughts
on reading and some of his favourite authors

I must admit I have never read a book by any author in the countries mentioned in my book apart from the UK, but I do like to read a wide range of books, from crime to historical ones.  It’s the reading that I get my pleasure from, not really the author. After all if we waited for just one author to release a book we would only read a few books every few years and to me that is a terrible thought.

So if I am really pressed on the matter my favourite author is Jeffery Archer*. I find his books are enjoyable and easy to read, which to me is far more important than anything to me, as if you do not enjoy the subject matter then why read?

You should at least enjoy and read a good book.  I personally think if you can put a book down and leave it alone for a few days then the book has not gripped your imagination, however a really well written book is a book you start to read and you cannot put down. You want to find out what is going to happen to the very end and will be one you can remember for years after.

I can remember the first book I actually read which was gripping and that has stayed with me to this very day was “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck. This book somehow got into my soul and even now I can recall some parts of it.

My second-best author is “Wilbur Smith”, I find him again a compelling read, but I think that reading is a very personal thing. What some like, others will hate and find boring, but I tend to read if I like the sound of the book.

Some famous authors churn out book after book but when it comes down to it the plot is always the same as the first one they wrote just change a few things so to me it is a personal thing, and you should read what you enjoy.

Some people are fanatical about reading celebrities and their autobiographies, which I find very self-centred and not very interesting. Apart from the odd few who have waited to live their lives before releasing their autobiography. Unlike those that are in their early twenties, still in the public eye, but just want to tell the world all about their millions and how it’s been a hard twenty years getting to that point. I promise I will never write one and become so shallow!

The third author who I admire and enjoy is Clive Cussler, he once again writes some interesting books, not everyone’s cup of tea but as I said reading is a personal thing after all it is only you a book and your imagination that in the end is partaking in the act, that’s why reading is so personal.

I hope some will read my book, For the Love of Grace and like it. No doubt some will trash it, but like I always like to quote from that great man Abe Lincoln – You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people, all of the time”.

*sic – Words And Peace is not responsible for the content and mistakes of authors highlighted on this blog

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Mailbox Monday August 29

 

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Mailbox Monday

 BOOK RECEIVED THIS PAST WEEK

Katharina Luther
Katharina Luther
to be released on Oct 4th,
by Clink Street Publishing
Received for review

On 31st October 1517 Martin Luther pinned ninety-five theses on the Castle Church door, Wittenberg, criticizing the Church of Rome; they were printed and published by Lucas Cranach and caused a storm. Nine young nuns, intoxicated by Luther’s subversive writings, became restless and longed to leave their convent. On Good Friday 1523 a haulier smuggled them out hidden in empty herring barrels. Five of them settled in Wittenberg, the very eye of the storm, and one of them – Katharina von Bora – scandalised the world by marrying the revolutionary former monk. Following a near miscarriage, she is confined to her bed to await the birth of their first child; during this time, she sets down her own story. Against a backdrop of 16th Century Europe this vivid account of Katharina von Bora’s early life brings to the spotlight this spirited and courageous woman.

 

WHAT GOOD BOOK
HAVE YOU RECEIVED?

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