The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #21

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The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #20

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #21, I got #5, which in my list is

On the Edge of the World

It was written in 1875 by Nikolai Leskov:
Based on a true story of an early Russian missionary bishop’s trip to Eastern Siberia. During his journey he learns through example and suffering that in indigenous peoples of all cultures there is dignity that must be recognized and built upon as a foundation for Christian conversion.  (Goodreads)

I’m totally thrilled, as I am in a Russian mood – well, that’s not that unusual.
I’m glad I didn’t get one of my many Japanese titles, as I want to keep them for the Japanese Literature Challenge starting in January at Dolce Bellezza.

It’a very short work, and I have until end of October to read and review it.

Have you read it? What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

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Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spin:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

***

HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT IS YOUR #?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

 

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The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #20

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2016-2020

The Classics Spin #20

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast

Today, for Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19:

The Dream of the Red Chamber

The Dream of the Red Chamber
by
Cao Xueqin

I have until end of May to read and review it. No big deal in itself, but I have lots of oher books to read for review at the same time.
I’m really curious, this is new territory for me.

According to Goodreads:
“It is one of China’s Four Great Classical Novels. It was composed in the middle of the 18th century during the Qing Dynasty. It is considered to be a masterpiece of Chinese vernacular literature and is generally acknowledged to be a pinnacle of Chinese fiction. “Redology” is the field of study devoted exclusively to this work.
The novel is remarkable not only for its huge cast of characters and psychological scope, but also for its precise and detailed observation of the life and social structures typical of 18th-century Chinese aristocracy.”

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See what this is all about.

***

HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT IS YOUR #?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

 

Save

Save

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Book reviews for winter reading challenges

This 2018-2019 Winter, I had two special reading challenges:

  1. The Classics Club, Classics Spin #19
  2. A book chosen for me by the staff of my Public Library

So here is what I had to read:

  A Moveable Feast  Visiting Tom

A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1964
Visiting Tom: A Man, a Highway, and the Road to Roughneck Graceby Michael Perry, published in 2012. 

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