Read or skip #7

READ OR SKIP

Inspired by book blogger Davida, at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog, herself inspired by a couple of other bloggers (see here for instance). I plan to post about it on Saturdays, except the 1st Sat of the month, when I usually feature another meme.

The rules are simple:

  1. Sort your Goodreads TBR shelf from oldest to new
  2. Pick the first 5 or 10 (or whatever number you choose, depending on how large your list is) books you see
  3. Decide whether to keep them or get rid of them.

RESULTS FOR PREVIOUS READ OR SKIP

read-or-skip 6

20, 21 and 23: skip
Read the others.

READ OR SKIP #7

read-or-skip-7

#readorskip

Let’s see what YOU think about these 8 titles today.

24) Sacré Bleu

  • This sounds like a mix of many things: humor (hmm, not sure about this), historical fiction, fantasy (hmm), mystery, and romance (hmm!)
  • BUT should I try this author?
    SKIP, unless you convince me otherwise

25) The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci

  • I think someone told me this was fantastic.
  • BUT the average Goodreads ratings is not high.
    READ?

26) The History of English spelling

  • The History of English Spelling reveals the history of Modern English spelling, tracing its origins and development from Old English up to the present day.” Totally my type of thing.
    READ

29) Language Myths and the History of English

  • Yes, I noticed the numbers are not in order, but that’s they are currently displayed on my Goodreads list. Weird.
  • The synopsis leaves me uninterested.
    SKIP

28) Varamo

  • Sounds like a great novella by Aira.
    READ

27) The Letter Killers Club

  • Classic Russian literature!
    READ

30) Barney’s Version

  • This one was highly recommended to me.
  • And I haven’t read many Canadian authors.
    READ

31) The Girl Who Leapt Through Time

  • “The Girl Who Leapt Through Time tells the story of Kazuko Yoshiyama, a third-year middle school student who accidentally acquires the ability to time travel after an unfortunate accident in a school science lab. “
  • Not sure I’ll like that, but it’s short, and an opportunity to discover another Japanese author.
    READ

What do YOU think? Should I skip more than two? What t do with #25?

HAVE YOU READ THESE?
READ OR SKIP?
I ALSO WELCOME SUGGESTIONS
FOR GOOD BOOKS ON SIMILAR THEMES

 

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TOP 5 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 05/19-20

TOP 5 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 

05/19-20/2012

Here are the latest titles added on my Goodreads TBR, I suggest them as the top 5 books for your week-end.

in FICTION:

 

Farewell, My Queen: A Novel

by Chantal Thomas, Moishe Black (Translator)

It was once the job of Madame Agathe-Sidonie Laborde to read books aloud to Marie-Antoinette. Now exiled in Vienna, she looks back twenty-one years to the legendary opulence of Versailles and meticulously reconstructs July 14, 15, and 16 of 1789.

When Agathe-Sidonie is summoned to the Queen’s side on the morning of the 14th, Versailles is a miniature universe, sparkling with every outward appearance of happiness and power, peopled with nobles of minutely calibrated rank, and run according to a hundred-year-old ritual called the Perfect Day. But with the shocking news that someone has woken the King in the night, order begins to disintegrate and word of the fall of the Bastille seeps into court. Soon Versailles’s beauty is nothing more than a shell encasing rising panic and chaos. Agathe-Sidonie watches as the Queen’s attempts to flee are aborted; her most intimate friend betrays her; and the King, appearing to sleepwalk through this crisis, never alters his routine of visiting the Apollo Salon several times a day to consult a giant crystal thermometer.

From the tiniest garret to the Hall of Mirrors, where Marie-Antoinette stands alone and terrified in the dark, Chantal Thomas shows us a world on the edge of oblivion and an intimate portrait of the woman who, like “fire in motion,” was its center.

Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d’Art

Absolutely nothing is sacred to Christopher Moore. The phenomenally popular, New York Times bestselling satirist whom the Atlanta Journal-Constitution calls, “Stephen King with a whoopee cushion and a double-espresso imagination” has already lampooned Shakespeare, San Francisco vampires, marine biologists, Death…even Jesus Christ and Santa Claus! Now, in his latest masterpiece, Sacre Bleu, the immortal Moore takes on the Great French Masters. A magnificent “Comedy d’Art” from the author of Lamb, Fool, and Bite Me, Moore’s Sacre Bleu is part mystery, part history (sort of), part love story, and wholly hilarious as it follows a young baker-painter as he joins the dapper Henri Toulouse-Lautrec on a quest to unravel the mystery behind the supposed “suicide” of Vincent van Gogh.

IN NON-FICTION:

 

The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci

In 1577, the Jesuit Priest Matteo Ricci set out from Italy to bring Christian faith and Western thought to Ming dynasty China. To capture the complex emotional and religious drama of Ricci’s extraordinary life, Jonathan Spence relates his subject’s experiences with several images that Ricci himself created–four images derived from the events in the bible and others from a book on the art of memory that Ricci wrote in Chinese and circulated among members of the Ming dynasty elite. A rich and compelling narrative about a remarkable life, The Memory Palace Of Matteo Ricci is also a significant work of global history, juxtaposing the world of Counter-Reformation Europe with that of Ming China.

Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops

by Jen Campbell (Goodreads Author)

From the hugely popular blog, a miscellany of hilarious and peculiar bookshop moments:
‘Can books conduct electricity?’
‘My children are just climbing your bookshelves: that’s ok… isn’t it?’
A John Cleese Twitter question [‘What is your pet peeve?’], first sparked the ‘Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops’ blog, which grew over three years into one bookseller’s collection of ridiculous conversations on the shop floor. From ‘Did Beatrix Potter ever write a book about dinosaurs?’ to the hunt for a paperback which could forecast the next year’s weather; and from ‘I’ve forgotten my glasses, please read me the first chapter’ to’Excuse me… is this book edible?’
This full-length collection illustrated by the Brothers McLeod also includes top ‘Weird Things’ from bookshops around the world.

Paris, I Love You but You’re Bringing Me Down

A self-described Francophile from when he was little, Rosecrans Baldwin always dreamed of living in Paris—drinking le café, eating les croissants, walking in les jardins—so when an opportunity presented itself to work for an advertising agency in Paris, he couldn’t turn it down. Despite the fact that he had no experience in advertising. And despite the fact that he barely spoke French. After an unimaginable amount of red tape and bureaucracy, Rosecrans and his wife packed up their Brooklyn apartment and left the Big Apple for the City of Light. But when they arrived, things were not eactly what Rosecrans remembered from a family vacation when he was nine years old.

Paris, I Love You but You’re Bringing Me Down is a nimble comic account of observing the French capital from the inside out. It is an exploration of the Paris of Sarkozy, text-message romances, smoking bans, and a McDonald’s beneath the Louvre—the story of an American who arrives loving Paris all out of proportion, but finds life there to be completely unlike what he expected. Over eighteen months, Rosecrans must rely on his dogged American optimism to get him through some very unromantic situations—at work (writing booklets on how to breast-feed, raise, and nurture children), at home (trying to finish writing his first novel in an apartment surrounded on all sides by construction workers), and at every confusing French dinner party in between. An offbeat update to the expat canon, Paris, I Love You is a book about a young man finding his preconceptions replaced by the oddities of a vigorous, nervy city—which is just what he needs to fall in love with Paris for the second time.

SO WHAT WILL YOU BE READING THIS WEEK-END?