2021: June wrap-up

JUNE 2021 WRAP-UP

Already one month of Summer gone…
And I managed to post an amazing number of posts all this past month: only five!!
I finally took one week away, which hadn’t happen for two years, like for many of us. One week in the woods, no phone, no internet, just hiking and birding, total bliss.
So I didn’t do much reading either, hence the most pathetic number this month.

So far, for my #20BooksofSummer21, I have managed to read 9 books. So it sounds like I am on track. Except only 1 of these 9 were on my original list for the challenge, lol.

One of the five posts of this month was the conclusion of a fascinating buddy-read/readalong with Carol @ Cas d’intérêt on The Archipelago of Another Life (L’Archipel d’une atre vie) by Andreï Makine.

📚 Here is what I read in June:

10 books:
5 in print 
with 1,275 pages, a daily average of 42 pages/day
5 in audio
= 14H03
, a daily average of 28 minutes

5 in nonfiction:

  1. The Book of Baruch
  2. The Book of Lamentations
  3. The Book of Ezekiel
  4. The Book of Daniel – these 4 books were as audiobooks, for The Classics Club and the Books in Translation Challenge
  5. The Future of Buildings, Transportation, and Power, by Roger Duncan & Michael E. Webber

2 in mystery:

  1. Compartiments tueurs, by Sébastien Japrisot – readalong with a French student, read for The Classics Club
  2. The Grid, by Philip Kerr

2 in literary fiction:

  1. Nature humaine, by Serge Joncour – audiobook
  2. La Disparition, by Georges Perec – readalong with a French student

1 in historical fiction:

  1. The Apothecary Diaries, vol.1, by Natsu Hyuuga – manga

A few notes about these books:

  • Totally by chance, I read two books about smart architecture: one was the nonfiction by Roger Duncan & Michael E. Webber, which actually won the 1st prize in IndieReader Discovery Award for the Environment Category.
    And the other one by Kerr, as a techno-thriller. Fascinating theme!
  • With these four Bible books, I finished listening to the whole Old Testament. Listening to them all as a whole, without studying them this time nor focusing on their spiritual meaning, was a bit challenging and actually quite depressing in content. And now to the New Testament!

MY FAVORITE BOOKS THIS PAST MONTH

    Nature humaine    La Disparition 2

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 60/137 (from November 2020-until November 2025)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 12 books
#20BooksofSummer21: 8/20 books
Total of books read in 2021 = 82/120 (68%)

Number of books added to my TBR this past month = 9

NO OTHER BOOK  REVIEWED THIS PAST MONTH

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

Books available for swapping

REVIEW COPIES AVAILABLE

Posted on my homepage

And we offer a Book Box!
And monthly raffle with a Newsletter
(see sample with link to sign up)

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Arsene Lupin

click on the cover to access my review

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

The top 7 books to read in June 2021

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

Julie Anna’s Books
please go visit, there are a lot of good things there!

TOP COMMENTERS 

Iza at Books & Livres
Greg at Book Haven
Lexlingua

please go and visit them,
they have great book blogs

BLOG MILESTONES 

2,350 posts
over 5,470 followers
over 223,000 hits

📚

Come back tomorrow
to see the books I plan to read in July

📚 📚 📚

How was YOUR month of June?

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!

The Archipelago of Another Life: read-along, last quarter of the book

  The Archipelago of Another Life Archipel dune autre vie

READ-ALONG
with Carol at Cas d’intérêt 

THE ARCHIPELAGO OF ANOTHER LIFE
L’ARCHIPEL D’UNE AUTRE VIE
by Andreï MAKINE

***

Here is our schedule:
Voici notre calendrier :

April 5: our reading begins, Chapters I and II. Visit Carol’s announcement post, with maps and much more!
5 avril : début de la lecture, Chapitres I et II. Allez voir le billet de Carol annonçant cette lecture, avec des cartes et autres bonnes choses.

April 19: questions asked by Cas d’intérêt on Chapters I and II
19 avril : questions postées à Cas d’intérêt sur ces deux premiers chapitres

May 4: my questions on second quarter of the book
4 mai : mes questions sur le second quart du livre

May 18: questions asked by Cas d’intérêt on the third quarter of the book, up to “loin de mon passé, du monde des autres où je n’avais plus de rôle à jouer.”
18 mai : questions postées à Cas d’intérêt sur le 3e quart du livre, jusqu’à “loin de mon passé, du monde des autres où je n’avais plus de rôle à jouer.”

June 4: questions here today on the last quarter of the book.
4 juin : questions ici sur le dernier quart du livre.

Last quarter of the book:
Dernier quart du livre :

1) The last quarter features several walks (Pavel and Elkan, then Pavel by himself, then again with Elkan; then Pavel and the teen; and the trip with Sacha). How similar/different are the last ones from the other walks we have seen before? What do you think the author is trying to convey?
1) Le dernier quart du livre présente plusieurs marches (Pavel et Elkan, Pavel seul, puis de nouveau avec Elkan ; et Pavel et l’adolescent ; enfin le voyage avec Sacha). Ces marches ont-elles des points similaires / différents de celles que nous avons rencontrées auparavant ? À ton avis, qu’est-ce que l’auteur essaie de transmettre ?

Carol:

Very intriguing question Emma. I am eager to hear your answer to this one. As I was reading, I didn’t take particular note of how these walks differed from others earlier in the book. Thinking back, I’d say that Makine spent less time describing the setting—except perhaps for the crossing of the Lindholm Strait—than he had earlier. I appreciated this because the setting was already well established and now as a reader, I was eager to find out what was going to take place between Pavel and Elkan.

Both of Pavel’s solo trips would also have been hurried with little time to reflect on the surroundings. So, I suppose that by not lingering on the scenery, Makine also conveys the one-track mindset that Pavel has adopted for both journeys. What did you think?

Question intéressante, Emma. J’attends tes impressions avec impatience. En lisant l’histoire, je n’ai pas noté la différence entre les marches à la fin du livre par rapport à celles au début. Avec le recul, je dirais que Makine a passé moins de temps pour décrire le cadre—sauf pour la traversée du détroit de Lindholm—qu’auparavant. J’ai apprécié moins de détails parce que Makine avait déjà bien établi les environs et à cette pointe du récit j’ai eu hâte d’apprendre ce qui allait se passer entre Pavel et Elkan.

Les deux marches en solo de Pavel auraient été exécutées avec précipitation sans le temps d’observer ou de réfléchir. Alors, en réduisant les descriptions de la nature, Makine nous montre que Pavel pense principalement à ses propres buts. En allant à la base, il pense à la gloire et la fin d’une vie de servitude. En revenant, il pense à rattraper Elkan et à la possibilité d’une nouvelle vie. Que penses-tu ?

Emma:

When I read about all these walks, I thought we could do some geometrical and dynamical designs to represent them, with all the different forces at play: for some walks, the person(s) is/are choosing to go in one direction, willingly, even eagerly. In some other walks, they go slowly, against their choice. I think the different natures of the walks tell us a lot about what the characters are going through, in their inner being.

I thought this is powerfully described at the beginning of this section. At the same time, Pavel says, “J’avançais derrière elle, comme si notre but était devenu le même. Montées, pentes, passages à gué.” And then next sentence: “J’imaginais la facilité avec laquelle j’aurais pu ralentir le pas, tourner sans être vu et, déroulant notre chemin dans le sens inverse, arriver au cantonnement une semaine plus tard… Cette idée me hantait.” I could represent it this way: <– Pavel –> He is literarily torn between these two opposite desires and directions. He is haunted, he is still un pantin. A few lines below, he does recognize “Oui, le pantin m’habitait encore”. Very different from the woman’s walk, from her constant courage and firm determination. She knows where she wants/has to go and never changes course.

Quand j’ai lu toutes ces marches, j’ai pensé qu’on faire des dessins géométriques et dynamiques pour les représenter, avec toutes les différentes forces en jeu : pour certaines marches, la ou les personnes choisissent d’aller dans une direction, volontairement, même avec envie. Dans certaines autres, es personnages avancent lentement, contre leur gré. Je pense que les différentes natures de ces marches nous en disent long sur ce que ces gens vivent intérieurement.

Ça me semble décrit avec force au début de cette section. En même temps, dit Pavel, “J‘avançais derrière elle, comme si notre but était devenu le même. Montées, pentes, passages à gué.” Et puis la phrase suivante : “J’imaginais la facilité avec laquelle j’aurais pu ralentir le pas, tourner sans être vu et, déroulant notre chemin dans le sens inverse, arriver au cantonnement une semaine plus tard… Cette idée me hantait.” Je pourrais le représenter ainsi : <– Pavel –> Il est littéralement tiraillé entre ces deux désirs et directions opposés. Il est hanté, il est toujours un pantin. Quelques lignes plus bas, il le reconnaît en effet : « Oui, le pantin m’habitait encore ». Très différent de la marche de la femme, de son courage constant et de sa ferme détermination. Elle sait où elle veut/doit aller et ne change jamais de cap.

2) Any comment on what’s awaiting Pavel at the military camp?
2) As-tu des remarques à faire sur ce qui attend Pavel au camp militaire ?

Carol:

Again, Makine surprised me with events that in hindsight, I feel I might have predicted. What takes place upon Pavel’s return is horrible yet perfectly in line with the character development that has preceded it—Ratinsky, the villainous brute and Vassine, the virtuous martyr. It also jibes with the underlying critique of the Soviet system that Makine conveys quite convincingly.

Part VI of the book that immediately follows made me want to learn more about the chaos that ensued in the wake of Stalin’s death. I don’t recall ever reading about this.

Encore une fois, Makine m’a surpris et avec le recul, j’ai l’impression que j’ai eu toutes les indications nécessaires pour prédire un tel résultat. Ce qui se passe est horrible pourtant tout à fait fidèle aux personnalités déjà établies. Ratinsky se montre une brute ignoble. Vassine reste le martyr vertueux. Le scénario soutient aussi la critique sous-jacente de Makine du système soviétique.

La partie VI du livre qui suit me fait vouloir apprendre plus sur le chaos qui s’est ensuivi après la mort de Staline.

Emma:

I wasn’t surprised by the “welcome” he received, though I would have guessed the wrong motive. Here Ratinsky’s violence is solely motivated by vainglory. He wants all the glory of the (unreal) capture to himself.
It’s fascinating that finally, facing that violence and vileness, Pavel is no longer un pantin!
I agree with what you highlight about the criticism of the system. This extreme corruption reminded me of my experience in 1988, right before the fall of the regime in Hungary. With a large group of young Christians, I went to Hungary. We were going there to perform a Christian play and offer the book of it to the Hungarian primate. When we arrived at the border with our large double-decker bus, we waited for ever. After several hours, someone got the brilliant idea to offer a case of bottles (we were coming from Burgundy). As by miracle, we were given the green light to enter the country a few minutes after. When I saw that corruption at play, I felt in my guts that this was not going to last much longer. Indeed, shortly after, a republic was proclaimed in Hungary.
Even though we had seen Vassine’s personality before, I was actually surprised by his sacrifice.
One thing that I thought totally useless and a bit too “romancy”, is when we learn at the end of he novel that Elkan had originally been in the same camp, and it’s actually thanks to her that Pavel had managed to escape the terrible underground prison. I’m still l wondering why the author put this in. What are your thoughts on this?

“L’accueil” qu’il a reçu ne m’a pas du tout surprise, même si j’aurais deviné le mauvais motif. Ici, la violence de Ratinsky est uniquement motivée par la vaine gloire. Il veut toute la gloire de la capture (qui n’a pas lieu) pour lui-même.
C’est fascinant qu’enfin, face à cette violence et à cette bassesse, Pavel ne soit plus un pantin !
Je suis d’accord avec ce que tu soulignes au sujet de la critique du système. Cette corruption extrême m’a rappelé mon expérience en 1988, juste avant la chute du régime en Hongrie. Avec un grand groupe de jeunes chrétiens, je suis allée en Hongrie. L’idée était d’y jouer une pièce chrétienne et en offrir le livre au primat hongrois. Quand on est arrivés à la frontière avec notre gros bus à impériale, on a attendu une éternité. Au bout de quelques heures, quelqu’un a eu la brillante idée d’offrir une caisse de bouteilles (on venait de Bourgogne). Comme par miracle, on nous a donné le feu vert pour entrer dans le pays juste quelques minutes après. Quand j’ai vu cette corruption à l’œuvre, j’ai senti que le régime n’allait pas durer très longtemps. En effet, peu de temps après, une république a été proclamée en Hongrie.

Même si on avait déjà vu la personnalité de Vassine, j’ai été surprise par son sacrifice.

Une chose que je trouvais totalement inutile et un peu trop “romantique”, c’est quand on apprend à la fin du roman qu’Elkan avait été à l’origine dans le même camp, et c’est en fait grâce à elle que Pavel avait réussi à s’échapper de la terrible prison souterraine. Je me demande encore pourquoi l’auteur a inséré ce détail. Qu’en penses-tu?

3) There’s again a huge place given to nature and wilderness in this last part. What is the author’s message through it?
3) Il y a encore une place énorme accordée à la nature sauvage dans cette dernière partie. Quel est le message de l’auteur ?

Carol:

I felt this part of the book was weaker than other parts.  To a certain extent, Makine conveys the environment’s harsh and unforgiving nature. A winter that lasts 9 months with temperatures that drop well below zero degrees fahrenheit is perilous, to say the least. At the same time, I feel that Makine romanticizes Pavel and Elkan’s existence in the Shantars. The fact that they could survive after reaching their destination as winter was setting in (rather than at the beginning of the summer when they’d have a chance to prepare a homestead) is asking a lot of the reader to accept.

I think we can all agree that modern life has its downsides. I highlighted a passage where Makine eloquently writes:

“Non, il ne s’agissait pas du nombre d'<<expériences>>, valeur si prisée par la modernité. Ni d’une sagesse fumeuse, fruit de l’une de ces expériences exotiques. Leur quotidien, rude et simple, ne visait aucun but édifiant.”

He goes on to give examples of the natural methods they used to stay warm and feed themselves. It all sounds rather idyllic but in reality, I think it would be unendingly stressful and mercilessly difficult. It reminded me of a PBS series called Frontier House that I watched many years ago. Three families agreed to move to Montana for a summer and live as the original homesteaders did at the end of the 19th century.

Their objective was to build themselves a homestead and spend the entire summer preparing for the winter. At the end of their stay, a panel of judges decided whether they had made adequate preparations. Two of the families were given no chance of surviving. A third, young couple, was deemed successful but only because they were young enough that their physical condition might allow them to survive.

These families took the challenge quite seriously and those with kids, put them to work. The women had it the worst, working from sunup until well past sundown every day. Unlike Pavel and Elkan, these families started out with livestock, sacks of flour, many hand tools from the era, and various supplies that  well-equipped settlers might have brought with them. Elkan and Pavel had none of these advantages and if anything, their environment sounds as if it could have been even harsher.

J’ai l’impression que cette partie du livre était moins forte. Dans une certaine mesure, Makine transmet le caractère dur et implacable de la nature. Un hiver qui dure pendant 9 mois avec des températures bien en dessous de zéro, c’est périlleux. En même temps, je pense que Makine idéalise l’existence de Pavel et Elkan dans les Îles Chantars. Le fait qu’ils auraient pu survivre après avoir atteint leur destination au même moment où l’hiver s’installe me semble invraisemblable.

Nous pouvons tous convenir que la vie moderne a des mauvais côtés. J’ai souligné le passage où Makine écrit avec éloquence:

“Non, il ne s’agissait pas du nombre d'<<expériences>>, valeur si prisée par la modernité. Ni d’une sagesse fumeuse, fruit de l’une de ces expériences exotiques. Leur quotidien, rude et simple, ne visait aucun but édifiant.”

Il élabore avec des exemples des méthodes naturelles qu’ils ont utilisées pour rester au chaud et se nourrir. Peut-être que ça a l’air idyllique, mais en réalité une telle existence serait continuellement stressante et impitoyablement difficile.

Emma:

This is true that it’s romanticized, but I gladly let myself be awed by it.
Ultimately, besides the strong counter-cultural message,  (“leur exil tenait au refus de participer à ces jeux”, “une autre vie était possible”), I felt it like the evocation of a “new heaven and a new earth”, Revelation 21:1), of a place where “another life” is possible, in a post-Stalin era.
But with the warning that unless we are renewed from the inside, this archipelago would be a mirage and could easily be destroyed by profit and secular entertainment, like shallow tourism.

C’est vrai que c’est romancé, mais je me suis laissée volontiers impressionner par ça.
Au final, outre le fort message contre-culturel,  (“leur exil tenait au refus de participer à ces jeux”, “une autre vie était possible”), je l’ai ressenti comme l’évocation d’un “nouveau ciel et d’une nouvelle terre”, Apocalypse 21,1), d’un lieu où « une autre vie » est possible, dans une ère post-stalinienne.
Mais avec l’avertissement qu’à moins que nous ne soyons renouvelés de l’intérieur, cet archipel serait un mirage et pourrait facilement être détruit par le profit et le divertissement séculaire, comme le tourisme superficiel.

4)  What do you think about the structure of the book?
4) Que penses-tu de la structure du livre ?

Carol:

I liked the structure of the book. Beginning and ending with the same narrator added to the intrigue. I think Makine is a master at keeping the reader at the edge of his chair, eager to know what comes next. The book was never dull. I also admire Makine’s ability to insert multiple surprising outcomes while remaining true to a realistic portrayal of his characters.

J’ai beaucoup aimé la structure du livre. Commencer et terminer avec le même narrateur a ajouté à la intrigue. Makine maîtrise bien l’aptitude pour garder le lecteur au bord de son siège. Le récit n’a jamais été ennuyeux. J’admire la capacité de Makine d’insérer de multiples événements inattendus à travers l’histoire, tout en restant fidèle aux caractères de ses personnages.

Emma:

I liked it too. I always like a story within a story, and here we have a story within a story, within another story. It made me think of the matryoshki, the Russian nesting dolls.
I feel this structure fits perfectly the story, as an invitation to embrace deeper values, the only ones that will give real meaning to whatever new social order we may want to achieve.
And yes, there were also a good amount of suspenseful scenes, and characters with clearly defined personalities.

Je l’ai aussi aimée. J’apprécie toujours une histoire dans une histoire, et ici on a une histoire dans une histoire, dans une autre histoire. Ça m’a fait penser aux matriochki, les poupées gigognes russes.
Je pense que cette structure correspond parfaitement à l’histoire, comme une invitation à embrasser des valeurs plus profondes, les seules qui donneront un sens réel à tout nouvel ordre social qu’on souhaiterait atteindre.
Et oui, il y avait aussi une bonne quantité de scènes pleines de suspense et des personnalités clairement définies.

5)  Did you find the last sentence was a satisfactory ending?
5) La dernière phrase te semble-t-elle une fin satisfaisante ?

Carol:

I didn’t really. I read through those last paragraphs a few times to make sure I wasn’t missing something. Perhaps I’m too much of a realist to find a third-hand account of spotting a sailboat in the fog, sailing along the coast of Belitchy, evidence of the couple’s existence, even figuratively speaking.

Earlier, I was disappointed when the narrator didn’t venture into the interior of the island to locate Pavel’s and Elkan’s homestead. Even if he’d found it destroyed, seeing the place would still give him a clearer vision of their existence. I’d hoped that among the ruins, he might uncover some hidden detail about their life on the island. In my opinion, this would have been a better “trace qu’un amour pouvait laisser parmi les vivants.”

Non, pas vraiment. J’ai relu les derniers paragraphes à plusieurs reprises pour m’assurer que je ne ratais pas quelque chose. Peut-être que je suis trop réaliste pour accepter un tel dénouement. L’aperçu de troisième main à travers le brouillard d’une voile carrée ne me dit pas grande chose.

Plus tôt dans le livre, j’ai été déçue quand le narrateur n’est pas allée à l’intérieur de l’île Belitchy pour trouver plus de traces de Pavel et Elkan. J’espérais qu’il découvrait certains indices parmi les décombres qui nous diraient plus sur leur vie et leur sort ultime. À mon avis, ça pourrait mieux servir de “trace qu’un amour pouvait laisser parmi les vivants.”

Emma:

I actually thought it worked, as I perceived “ce voilier dans la brume lumineuse” like a sign of hope. To go back to my interpretation, as explained above in 3 and 4, rebuilding a society on new values is a fragile thing, nothing is ever sure. You can only hope.

En fait, je trouve que ça marche, je perçois “ce voilier dans la brume lumineuse” comme un signe d’espoir. Pour en revenir à mon interprétation, comme expliqué plus haut dans 3 et 4, reconstruire une société sur de nouvelles valeurs est une chose fragile, rien n’est jamais sûr. On ne peut qu’espérer.

6) How do you now understand the title? What do you think is the author’s ultimate message of his book? Do you agree with him?
6) Comment comprends-tu maintenant le titre ? D’après toi, quel est le message ultime de l’auteur ? Es-tu d’accord avec lui ?

Carol:
I think I’ve already touched on this in question 3. From the beginning, I felt the book was heading in the direction of establishing a life free from Soviet oppression and societal corruption somewhere in the Shantars. I don’t want to sound too critical because I think the book has many important messages and that it delivers a beautifully crafted story. Given the horrific dystopia that the central characters found themselves in, their life on Belitchy may well have been their best option. I just don’t buy into the notion that a life in the wilderness has many advantages over lives lived in modern society.

Je pense avoir parlé un peu sur ce sujet pour la question 3. Dès le début, j’ai eu l’impression que l’histoire visait une vie dans les Chantars, à l’abri de l’oppression soviétique et de la corruption sociale. Je ne veux pas donner l’impression que je n’apprécie pas le livre. Je pense qu’il présente plusieurs messages importantes sur la vie et sur le caractère humaine. C’est aussi un très beau récit.

Étant donné la dystopie horrifique dans laquelle les personnages principals se trouvaient, leur vie sur Belitchy aurait pu été le meilleur choix. Je n’adhère pas pourtant à l’idée qu’une vie dans le désert a de nombreux avantages par rapport à une vie dans la société moderne.

Emma:

I also already mentioned above what I thought the ultimate message was.
Having lived myself twenty years far from the trappings of modern society, and still trying to embrace counter-cultural values in my everyday life, I tend to agree with the author’s message.
For me, it’s very scary that most people can no longer even live in silence, they absolutely need noise, distraction, and they are so busy that they don’t have time to go deep inside. A society built on these principles is extremely fragile.

It strikes me that a few other contemporary French authors tend to focus on similar messages, urging people to turn again to nature, to listen, to look.
I’m thinking for instance of novelist Serge Joncour in Wild Dog. I’m currently listening to his Nature humaine (published in August 2020), another wake-up call.
And the other author I have in mind writes nonfiction. That’s Sylvain Tesson, with Dans les forêts de Sibérie (the English title is more explicit: The Consolations of the Forest: Alone in a Cabin on the Siberian Taiga).
In Sur les chemins noirs, he reacts strongly against the French government trying to connect all the rural French areas through the internet, and destroying a lot of natural environments, as well as the places of quiet where you can access your deeper self.
Finally, I’d like to mention his La Panthère des neiges (to be published in English as The Art of Patience: Seeking the Snow Leopard in Tibet, on July 13, 2021 by Penguin Press). Whoever wrote the synopsis puts it well:
and as they keep their vigil, Tesson comes to embrace the virtues of patience and silence. His faith is rewarded when the snow leopard, the spirit of the mountain, reveals itself: an embodiment of what we have surrendered in our contemporary lives. And the simple act of waiting proves to be an antidote to the frenzy of our times.
A celebration of the power and grace of the wild, and a requiem for the world’s vanishing places, The Art of Patience is a revelatory account of the communion between nature and the human heart. Sylvain Tesson has written a new masterpiece on the relationship between man and beast in prose as sublime as the wilderness that inspired it.

J’ai aussi déjà mentionné ci-dessus ce que je pensais être le message ultime.
Ayant moi-même vécu vingt ans loin des “valeurs” de la société moderne, et essayant toujours d’embrasser des valeurs contre-culturelles dans ma vie quotidienne, j’ai tendance à être d’accord avec le message de l’auteur.
Pour moi, c’est très effrayant que la plupart des gens ne puissent même plus vivre en silence, ils ont absolument besoin de bruit, de distraction, et ils sont tellement occupés qu’ils n’ont pas le temps d’entrer profondément en eux. Une société reposant sur ces principes est extrêmement fragile.

Cela me frappe que quelques autres auteurs français contemporains ont tendance à se concentrer sur des messages similaires, exhortant les gens à se tourner à nouveau vers la nature, à écouter, à regarder.
Je pense par exemple au romancier Serge Joncour dans Chien-Loup. J’écoute actuellement son Nature humaine (publié en août 2020), une autre sonnette d’alarme.
Et l’autre auteur que j’ai en tête écrit de la non-fiction. C’est Sylvain Tesson, avec Dans les forêts de Sibérie (le titre anglais est plus explicite : The Consolations of the Forest : Alone in a Cabin on the Siberian Taiga).
Dans Sur les chemins noirs, il réagit fortement contre le gouvernement français qui essaie de connecter toutes les zones rurales françaises par l’ Internet, et détruit de nombreux environnements naturels, ainsi que les lieux de calme où on peut tenter d’accéder au moi plus profond.
Enfin, j’aimerais mentionner Panthère des neiges (à paraître en anglais sous le titre The Art of Patience: Seeking the Snow Leopard in Tibet, le 13 juillet 2021 par Penguin Press).
L’auteur du résumé en anglais dit bien les choses :

“et alors qu’ils veillent, Tesson en vient à embrasser les vertus de patience et de silence. Sa foi est récompensée lorsque le léopard des neiges, l’esprit de la montagne, se révèle : une incarnation de ce que nous avons abandonné dans nos vies contemporaines. Et le simple fait d’attendre s’avère être un antidote à la frénésie de notre temps.
Une célébration de la puissance et de la grâce de la nature et un requiem pour les lieux de disparition du monde, L’art de la patience est un récit révélateur de la communion entre la nature et le cœur humain. Sylvain Tesson a écrit un nouveau chef-d’œuvre sur la relation entre l’homme et la bête en prose aussi sublime que la nature sauvage qui l’a inspiré.”

7) Did you like this book, why or why not?
7) As-tu aimé ce livre, pourquoi ou pourquoi pas ?

Carol:

Yes, I definitely enjoyed the book. I loved the descriptions of the Taiga. I thought Makine’s characters were excellent. He described realistic backstories for each of them using an economy of words. Each man was unique and yet a believable by-product of the hardships that had formed him. In the end, Makine gave us a bit more about Elkan to help us understand her path to becoming a fugitive. One thing missing, however, were a few details that could explain how she came to be such an adept survivalist. The fact that she was a native of the area, was not quite enough to satisfy me but this is a nitpick.

I’ve already commented that I think Makine is a master storyteller. I can’t imagine knowing how to layer a plot so completely that it exhibits so many of the key elements of good writing and still flows seamlessly along. I’ve really appreciated Andrew Blackman’s commentary on this book. As a professional author, he speaks far more intelligently about Makine’s craft than I’m able to do. 

Oui, j’ai beaucoup aimé. Les descriptions de la taïga me plaisent. Les personnages sont excellents. Makine nous donne des profils justes et riches avec une précision de mots. Chaque homme a un caractère unique et crédible. À la fin, Makine nous présente un peu plus sur Elkan pour mieux comprendre sa vie auparavant. Une chose qui manque, cependant, ce sont quelques détails qui auraient pu expliquer comment elle est devenue une survivaliste exemplaire. Le fait qu’elle est autochtone n’est pas assez pour me satisfaire, mais tant pis.

J’ai déjà dit que Makine me semble être un maître conteur. J’ai beaucoup apprécié les commentaires d’Andrew Blackman qui lit le livre avec nous. En tant qu’auteur professionnel, il parle brillamment des techniques d’écritures, ce que je ne sais pas très bien faire.

Emma:

I liked it a lot, especially for the ultimate messages highlighted above. Originally, I wanted to listen to it, but the service I use for French audiobooks never made it available. I’m actually glad I read it, as I had more opportunity to take the time to taste the great style. There are so powerful sentences that you just want to read and re-read.

I want to thank Carol for joining me in this bilingual adventure. It made it an even richer reading experience, that compelled me to slow down, reflect, analyze, and share. Merci Carol !
I invite you to check her post today, where she added gorgeous pictures of the archipelago (The Shantar Islands)!

Je l’ai beaucoup aimé, surtout pour les messages ultimes mis en évidence ci-dessus. À l’origine, je voulais l’écouter, mais le service que j’utilise pour les livres audio en français ne l’a jamais rendu disponible. En fait, je suis contente de l’avoir lu, car j’ai eu plus l’occasion de prendre le temps de goûter le style exquis. Il y a des phrases si puissantes que vous voulez juste lire et relire.

Je tiens à remercier Carol de m’avoir accompagnée dans cette aventure bilingue. Ma lecture en a été d’autant plus enrichie, m’obligeant à ralentir, à réfléchir, à analyser et à partager. Merci Carol !
Je vous invite à consulter son blog aujourd’hui. Elle a ajouté de magnifiques photos de l’archipel (Les îles Chantar) !

Please check also the wonderful reflections by Andrew Blackman on the end of the book

Feel free to comment here and/or on Carol’s blog,
or create your own post.

N’hésitez pas à commenter ici et/ou sur le blog de Carol,
ou à créer vos propre billet.

2021: May wrap-up

May 2021 WRAP-UP

Another busy month, that didn’t leave me much time for blogging.
Besides books waiting for reviews, I miss not having time to do Sunday Posts and/or Top Ten Tuesday posts.
Hopefully, life will quiet down a bit.
Weeks go by so quickly. It feels like we had snow yesterday, yet we are already eating produce from our garden (lettuce, spinach, and kale and rhubarb that grow back every year).

In May, I took part in #BoutofBooks and did two buddy-reads, on The Andromeda Strain and on The Archipelago of Another Life (our last English-French Q&A will be posted on June 4). Lots of fun!

I was also super busy with an international webinar I organized for France Book Tours“French artists in fiction: four lives, four authors”. About 70 people signed up, from 7 countries. If you missed it, you can watch the video I made from it, with excerpts read by the authors added. It was fascinating, but a lot of work before and after.

In June-July-August, I will be working on my #20BooksofSummer21.

I am also in the process of streamlining all my Categories and Tags.
And of transitioning France Book Tours to another theme, and other forms of marketing!

As  I said above, not much happening on the blog this past month, but I did read a good deal.

📚 Here is what I read in May:

13 books:
6 in print 
with 1,685 pages, a daily average of 54 pages/day
7 in audio
= 24H17
, a daily average of 47 minutes

4 in nonfiction:

  1. The Book of Zechariah
  2. The Book of Malachi
  3. The Book of Isaiah
  4. The Book of Jeremiah – these 4 books were as audiobooks, for The Classics Club and the Books in Translation Challenge

4 in mystery:

  1. The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories (Hercule Poirot #21), by Agatha Christie
  2. Sad Cypress (Hercule Poirot #22), by Agatha Christie
  3. One, Two, Buckle my Shoe (Hercule Poirot #23), by Agatha Christie – these first 3 were as audiobooks, for The Classics Club
  4. People Like Them, by Samira Sedira – received for review for Criminal Element

3 in historical fiction:

  1. Monet & Oscar, by Joe Byrd – received for review for France Book Tours
  2. The Archipelago of Another Life / L’Archipel d’une autre vie, by Andreï Makine
  3. Flight of the Raven, by Jean-Pierre Gibrat – graphic novel

2 in science-fiction:

  1. The Andromeda Strain, by Michael Crichton – for The Classics Club
  2. Project Hail Mary, by Andy Weir – received for review through Netgalley

MY FAVORITE BOOKS THIS PAST MONTH

    The Archipelago of Another Life   The Andromeda Strain

READING CHALLENGES & RECAP

Classics Club: 55/137 (from November 2020-until November 2025)
Japanese Literature Challenge: 12 books 

Total of books read in 2021 = 73/120 (60%)
Number of books added to my TBR this past month = 22

NO OTHER BOOK  REVIEWED THIS PAST MONTH

GIVEAWAYS

The open giveaways are on my homepage

Books available for swapping

REVIEW COPIES AVAILABLE

Posted on my homepage

And we offer a Book Box!
And monthly raffle with a Newsletter
(see sample with link to sign up)

MOST POPULAR BOOK REVIEW THIS PAST MONTH

Arsene Lupin

click on the cover to access my review

MOST POPULAR POST THIS PAST MONTH
– NON BOOK REVIEW –

20 books of summer

BOOK BLOG THAT BROUGHT ME MOST TRAFFIC THIS PAST MONTH

Julie Anna’s Books
please go visit, there are a lot of good things there!

TOP COMMENTERS 

Marianne at Let’s Read
Iza at Books & Livres
Greg at Book Haven
please go and visit them,
they have great book blogs

BLOG MILESTONES 

2,345 posts
over 5,470 followers
over 221,800 hits

📚

Come back tomorrow
to see the books I plan to read in June

📚 📚 📚

How was YOUR month of May?

Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction
has created a Month In Review meme
where you can link your monthly recap posts
Thanks Nicole!