Six degrees of separation: From Three Women to a riddle

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Three Women to a Pea

You are probably going to think I’m crazy, but this time, I have tried to do a REAL “six degrees of separation”, I mean, by finding connections that come to mind with each title. Maybe I also needed to prove myself I could actually do that!
Actually, I prepared this a few weeks ago, and today, as I finalize my post, I realize new connections are coming to mind, so I’ll spare you my first ideas, those are the ones I have today. Which means, I could probably generate a new list every day!!

AND, as I couldn’t easily part with my usual way of doing this meme, I’m offering you 2 chains today!!

After the covers,
you can find the links to my reviews
or to the title on Goodreads

A) Here you go, with the first “traditional” chain”:

  Three Women macbeth

  By Night the Mountain Burns fire season

  The Memory Police ella minnow pea

1. Three Women
This is the book we were supposed to start with. I haven’t read it and don’t intend to, I’m not interested in feminism.

2. When I hear 3 women, I automatically think of a most famous trio, the 3 witches in Macbeth. I have read many plays by Shakespeare, and actually studied in depth several of them, this one among others. I re-read it a few years ago.

3. I also enjoy a lot how 3 witches are portrayed in Night of Bald Mountain, by Mussorgsky. Which made me think of another book with both night and mountain in the title: By Night the Mountain Burns. I didn’t find it super good, but it’s unique, as it focuses on the oral tradition on an island in Equatorial Guinea, by an author of this country!

4. The burning part made me think of a great book on fire: Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout. It’s an excellent nonfiction focusing on solitude in that little space up the fire lookout tower, on the wilderness, on what happens in a forest.

5. I had the same impression of confinement in scenes from The Memory Police. It’s a dystopia. And there’s a book within the book, and a character ends up trapped in a very small place up a tower.
The main idea of the book is simple: on a small island, a special police arbitrarily decides that things should disappear, one at a time. Go to my review to see why I really enjoyed it.

6. You almost find the same idea in a fun book Ella Minnow Pea. We are also on an island, and this time, it’s letters of the alphabet that are progressively banned. Fun and smart book!

B) And now, using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started with three women and ended up with a riddle!
Come with me!

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

Three Women Three Lives Tomomi

 our thoughts Confronting and Controlling

  A Crack in Creation The Riddle of the labyrinth

1. Three Women
See above

2. Three Lives of Tomomi Ishikawa
From my review: “I devoured very quickly this very smart novel. I loved the quality of the writing, of descriptions and inner feelings. I loved the quirkiness of it all, as you never really know if you are in truth or fiction, and of course I loved the treasure hunt especially in Paris, with the mention of lots of famous or not so famous places.”

3. Our Thoughts Determine Our Lives
An Orthodox book for a change. It focuses “on the impact your thoughts can have, not only on your own lives, but also on people around you, and even on the world at large. Whether your thoughts are positive or negative, they will determine your life and the lives of many.”

4. Confronting and Controlling Thoughts
Another Orthodox book I really enjoyed. The passages quoted come from the Philokalia, a major spiritual work. All the books by Coniaris are very accessible.
It’s about how to stop thoughts from polluting your mind and heart.

5. A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution
I’m ending with 2 books on my TBR. With the huge and rapid development in gene science, I want to read this one and see where we are at now. “What will we do with this unfathomable power?”

6. The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code
I want to read this book, because the topic is intriguing: “The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code tells one of the most intriguing stories in the history of language, masterfully blending history, linguistics, and cryptology with an elegantly wrought narrative.” But also because it was written by Margalit Fox, and that’s how I discovered it. You may remember how blown away I was by Fox’s book on Conan Doyle. This lady knows how to write!!

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
AND WHICH TYPE OF CHAIN
DO YOU PREFER SEEING ON MY BLOG?

 

The Classics Club 2019-2024

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub

The Classics Club
September 7, 2019 – September 7, 2024

I’m totally thrilled to present to you my 2nd list of 50 titles for The Classics Club.

Yes, I managed to read/listen to 50 books in actually 4 years. See my first list here.
I’m very far from having reviewed them all, but I plan to do more reviews on these, and hopefully a few recap videos.

Here is my new table, with color codes for nonfiction, mystery, and Japanese, 3 prominent categories. I will obviously update the table as I go along.

How did I come up with these titles?
Simple: I opened my To-Be-Read Goodreads shelf, and put them in order of publication, and I picked the 50 oldest titles! Those are titles I added there along the years. I believe only Cyrano will be a re-read.

Be patient, it may take a few seconds for the file below to show up

I’m curious:

  1. How many of these have you read?
  2. Which one/ones is/are your favorite?

Club hashtags on Twitter:

OUT OF THESE 50 TITLES
HOW MANY HAVE YOU READ?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

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Six degrees of separation: From Moscow to Vimy

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
From Moscow to Vimy

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started in Moscow and ended up in Vimy, France, where many Canadian soldiers fought during WWI.
Come with me!

Here are my own quirky rules:

1. Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word, or you are stuck

After the covers,
you can find the links to my reviews
or to the title on Goodreads

 a-gentleman-in-moscowArsene Lupin 

 Mrs Pollifax and the second thiefStar For Mrs Blake

 Shakespeare's Star warsUnravelled

1. A Gentleman in Moscow
I was going to read it, as I have heard so many people rave about this book. But then, I talked with a Russian woman, and she told this could really never have happened in Moscow. As it’s a historical fiction, and I like my histfic to be based on real facts, I’ve passed so far. But you may convince me to read it?

2. Arsène Lupin, Gentleman-Thief
The author Leblanc is basically the French Conan Doyle. This is a major classic in mystery, and totally fun! He’s a thief, yes, but what a gentleman!!

3. Mrs. Pollifax and the Second Thief
I discovered Mrs. Pollifax, because I wanted to read books set in different countries, for the 52 countries challenge.
I have loved this series to pieces, the character of Mrs. Pollifax is delightful: image a retired lady who’s afraid to get bored, and ends up working as a secret agent. Each book of the series is set in a  different country. This one is in Sicily, and is about art thieves and the mob.

4. A Star For Mrs. Blake
Excellent historical novel featuring Gold Star Mothers, whom I knew nothing about.
VERDICT: Very powerful, yet not overwhelmingly emotional historical novel, reflecting on many facets of international conflicts. Highly recommended to anyone curious to know what happened on the field of WWI, and how it affected people, relationships, and countries.

5. William Shakespeare’s Star Wars
This is an incredible series: imagine Star Wars, “all recounted in the style of the Bard,
with rhymes, chorus, list of characters entering and exiting for each scene, just like a real play. It really made me laugh aloud many times.”
VERDICT: For fans of Star Wars and Shakespeare,  this book offers a refreshing look at how it all began. Tension, suspense and humor are all present. Not to miss.
(the link is to book 1)

6. Unravelled: Two Wars. Two Affairs. One marriage
Another great historical novel, both on WWI and WWII. Great author!

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HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
DID YOU PLAY
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?