Japanese Literature Challenge 14

JAPANESE LITERATURE CHALLENGE 14Japanese Literature Challenge 14 #JapaneseLitChallenge14   #JapaneseLiterature

Thanks to DolceBelleza (@bellezzamjs) who has been organizing this challenge for many years! This is my 6th participation.
Click on the logo to read more about it, and here to see reviews of books read.

The Challenge runs January-March 2021. I’m going to try to read 3 books each month, so that’s a total of 9 books 10 books.
02/27 edit: I will read one more, that I won at Dolce Bellezza.

📚 📚 📚

Here is my TBR for this event (my recap will be updated at the end of this post):

📚 Books on my physical shelf:

1. The Sound of Waves (1954), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
2. N.P. (1990), by Banana Yoshimoto (trans. by Ann Sherif)
3. Some Prefer Nettles (1928),  by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Edward G. Seidensticker)
4. Before the Coffee Gets Cold (2015), by Toshikazu Kawaguchi, (trans. by Geoffrey Trousselot)
5. Klara and the Sun (2021), by Kazuo Ishiguro

📚 For my Classics Club list (besides # 1 and 3 above):

6. Kusamakura (1906), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
7. To the Spring Equinox and Beyond (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Kingo Ochiai and Sanford M. Goldstein)
8. The Miner (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Jay Rubin)
9. Devils in Daylight (1918), by Junichirō Tanizaki (Dans l’œil du démon, trans. in French by Patrick Honoré and Ryoko Sekiguchi)
10. In Praise of Shadows (1933), by Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, Edward G. Seidensticker (Translator), Thomas J. Harper (Translator),
11. A Cat, a Man, and Two Women (1936), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Paul McCarthy)
12. The Black Lizard and Beast in the Shadows (1928), by Edogawa Rampo (trans. by Ian Hughes)

📚 📚 📚

RECAP FOR MARCH 31

So here are the books I managed to read:

1. The Sound of Waves (1954), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Meredith Weatherby),
finished on 1/16/21, reviewed here
2. Some Prefer Nettles (1928),  by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Edward G. Seidensticker), finished on 1/22/21, reviewed here
3. N.P. (1990), by Banana Yoshimoto (trans. by Ann Sherif)
finished on 1/25/21, reviewed here
4. In Praise of Shadows (1933), by Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, Edward G. Seidensticker (Translator), Thomas J. Harper (Translator),
finished on 2/4/21, reviewed here
5. A Cat, a Man, and Two Women (1936), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Paul McCarthy),
finished on 2/9/21, reviewed here
6. Devils in Daylight (1918), by Junichirō Tanizaki (Dans l’œil du démon, trans. in French by Patrick Honoré and Ryoko Sekiguchi), finished on 2/13/21, reviewed here
7. Kusamakura (1906), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
finished on 3/5/21
8. Klara and the Sun (2021), by Kazuo Ishiguro
finished on 3/19/21
9. Le Mineur (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Hélène Morita)
finished on 3/20/21
10. Before the Coffee Gets Cold (2015), by Toshikazu Kawaguchi, (trans. by Geoffrey Trousselot)
finished on 3/21/21
11. To the Spring Equinox and Beyond (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Kingo Ochiai and Sanford M. Goldstein)
finished on 3/29/21
12. The Black Lizard and Beast in the Shadows (1928), by Edogawa Rampo (trans. by Ian Hughes)
finished on 3/30/21

CLICK ON THE BEAUTIFUL LOGO TO JOIN!
WHICH OTHER BOOKS WOULD YOU ENCOURAGE ME
TO READ FOR THIS CHALLENGE?

Japanese Literature Challenge 13

Japanese Literature 13JAPANESE LITERATURE CHALLENGE 13

#JapaneseLitChallenge13    #JapaneseLiterature

So glad DolceBelleza (@bellezzamjs) is organizing this challenge again!
Click here or on the logo to read more about it.

Checked my history, and realized this is my 5th participation. I did the Japanese Literature Challenge from 2012-2015, but for some reasons, I stopped after that, even though I regularly read Japanese Lit.

I have currently 13 Japanese novels I mean to read, so this Challenge, running from January-March 2020, is perfect.

Here is my TBR for this event (my recap is at the very end of this post)

📚 Ebooks received in 2019 through Edelweiss Plus:

1. The Ten Loves of Nishino (2003), by Hiromi Kawakami (transl. by Allison Markin Powell) = reviewed on 2/27/20
2. Inhabitation (1984), by Teru Miyamoto (transl. by Roger K. Thomas)
***

📚 Books on my physical shelf:

3. The Sound of Waves (1954), by Yukio Mishima (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
4. N.P. (1990), by Banana Yoshimoto (trans. by Ann Sherif)
5. Some Prefer Nettles (1928),  by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Edward G. Seidensticker)

***

📚 For my Classics Club list (besides # 3 and 5 above):

6. Kusamakura (1906), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Meredith Weatherby)
7. The Book of Tea (1906), by Kakuzō Okakura= (listened to) reviewed on 1/12/20
8. Sanshirō (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Jay Rubin) = reviewed on 1/17/20
9. And Then (1909), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Norma Moore Field = reviewed on 1/25/20
10. The Gate (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Francis Mathy) = reviewed on 2/6/20
11. To the Spring Equinox and Beyond (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Kingo Ochiai and Sanford M. Goldstein)
12. The Miner (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Jay Rubin)
13. Devils in Daylight (1918), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by J. Keith Vincent)
14. A Cat, a Man, and Two Women (1936), by Junichirō Tanizaki (trans. by Paul McCarthy)

***

📚 Book on my e-shelf:

15. Norwegian Wood, by Haruki Murakami (trans. by Jay Rubin) = read with the online Murakami Book Club (through Discord)= reviewed on 2/19/20

📚 Books checked out at my library:

16. Selected Poems (1902), by Masaoka Shiki (trans. by Burton Watson) reviewed on 2/9/20
17.  The Essential Haiku: Versions of Basho, Buson, and Issa, ed. by Robert Hass = reviewed on 2/23/20

You notice several books by the same authors, it’s just that these have been on my TBR for a long time. Thankfully, most are rather short, so I should be able to read at least 4 per month, besides other books. And I’ll try to listen to some!

NB: there are some other huge Japanese authors not on this list: my favorite, Haruki Murakami, Ishiguro, and many more, because I have already read many by them, or mostly because I don’t need to read them urgently if I don’t have an egalley of them waiting; if they are not collecting dust on my shelf; or they are not on my Classics List to read in 5 years. But your recommendations are welcome for later in the year or this challenge another year!

1/12/20 update: I just discovered that Sanshiro is actually the first volume of a trilogy, so I’ll read And Then and The Gate after it.

2/2/20 update: In Soseki’s books, I found reference to the great master of Haiku Masaoka Shiki, who was actually born the same year as Soeseki and spent some time with him. So of course I had to read that!

RECAP ON MARCH 31

So here are the books I managed to read:

  1. The Ten Loves of Nishino (2003), by Hiromi Kawakami (transl. by Allison Markin Powell) = reviewed on 2/27/20
  2. The Book of Tea (1906), by Kakuzō Okakura= (listened to) reviewed on 1/12/20
  3. Sanshirō (1908), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Jay Rubin) = reviewed on 1/17/20
  4. And Then (1909), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Norma Moore Field = reviewed on 1/25/20
  5. The Gate (1910), by Natsume Sōseki (trans. by Francis Mathy) = reviewed on 2/6/20
  6. Norwegian Wood, by Haruki Murakami (trans. by Jay Rubin) = read with the online Murakami Book Club (through Discord)= reviewed on 2/19/20
  7. Selected Poems (1902), by Masaoka Shiki (trans. by Burton Watson) reviewed on 2/9/20
  8. The Essential Haiku: Versions of Basho, Buson, and Issa, ed. by Robert Hass = reviewed on 2/23/20

And I’m currently reading Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, with my online Murakami book club.

I’m happy with what I managed to read, though disappointed I didn’t get yet to Inhabitation, received in 2019!, nor to the 3 physical books waiting on my shelf.
So I I’ll definitely be reading more Japanese books this year!

CLICK ON THE BEAUTIFUL LOGO TO JOIN!
WHICH OTHER BOOKS WOULD YOU ENCOURAGE ME
TO READ FOR THIS CHALLENGE?

 

Bout of Books 24: Day 3 challenge

boutofbooks 24

#boutofbooks
#bob24igphoto

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda Shofner and Kelly Rubidoux Apple. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, January 7th and runs through Sunday, January 13th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 24 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books team

Today, the challenge is based on an idea I submitted.

Challenges

Six degrees of separation from Bout to Books
Find an original way to connect the two words (Bout and Books) through six books
Thanks to Emma (Words and Peace) for today’s challenge.
***

I submitted this idea, based on the quirky way I do the monthly meme Six degrees of separation. I tried something similar but it didn’t work as expected, so here is what I came up with, based on titles I have read – click on covers to see my reviews

bob challenge

The Blue   our thoughts

two-days-gone

 

of mice and men The Book Artist Kingdom of the Blind Syncopation

Did you do this challenge?
Curious to see what you came up with!

Be sure to enter my giveaway

Check my Bout of Books 24 ultimate goal

 

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