Book club January 2019 and Friday Finds

Bookshelf4
Picture from my bookshelves
edited with Pixlr
#Fridayfinds

I’m presenting here the books we shared
at our last block Book Club meeting
– it’s a potluck book club,
meaning each member shares about his/her latest good read.
Awesome for diversity in books, lively conversations,
and your TBR getting suddenly taller!
(synopsis taken from Goodreads.com)

Wow, looks like I haven’t shared about our Book Club reads for a long time. So here are the titles we talked about at our January meeting:

1. Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams, by Matthew Walker  (2017)
presented by M.

The first sleep book by a leading scientific expert—Professor Matthew Walker, Director of UC Berkeley’s Sleep and Neuroimaging Lab—reveals his groundbreaking exploration of sleep, explaining how we can harness its transformative power to change our lives for the better.
Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, wellness, and longevity. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep, or what good it served, or why we suffer such devastating health consequences when we don’t sleep. Compared to the other basic drives in life—eating, drinking, and reproducing—the purpose of sleep remained elusive.
An explosion of scientific discoveries in the last twenty years has shed new light on this fundamental aspect of our lives. Now, preeminent neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker gives us a new understanding of the vital importance of sleep and dreaming. Within the brain, sleep enriches our ability to learn, memorize, and make logical decisions. It recalibrates our emotions, restocks our immune system, fine-tunes our metabolism, and regulates our appetite. Dreaming mollifies painful memories and creates a virtual reality space in which the brain melds past and present knowledge to inspire creativity.
Walker answers important questions about sleep: how do caffeine and alcohol affect sleep? What really happens during REM sleep? Why do our sleep patterns change across a lifetime? How do common sleep aids affect us and can they do long-term damage? Charting cutting-edge scientific breakthroughs, and synthesizing decades of research and clinical practice, Walker explains how we can harness sleep to improve learning, mood, and energy levels; regulate hormones; prevent cancer, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes; slow the effects of aging; increase longevity; enhance the education and lifespan of our children, and boost the efficiency, success, and productivity of our businesses. Clear-eyed, fascinating, and accessible, Why We Sleepis a crucial and illuminating book.

2. The Good Muslim (Bangla Desh #2)by Tahmima Anam  (2011)
presented by B.

From prizewinning Bangladeshi novelist Tahmima Anam comes her deeply moving second novel about the rise of Islamic radicalism in Bangladesh, seen through the intimate lens of a family.
Pankaj Mishra praised A Golden Age, Tahmima Anam’s debut novel, as a “startlingly accomplished and gripping novel that describes not only the tumult of a great historical event . . . but also the small but heroic struggles of individuals living in the shadow of revolution and war.” In her new novel, The Good Muslim, Anam again deftly weaves the personal and the political, evoking with great skill and urgency the lasting ravages of war and the competing loyalties of love and belief.
In the dying days of a brutal civil war, Sohail Haque stumbles upon an abandoned building. Inside he finds a young woman whose story will haunt him for a lifetime to come. . . . Almost a decade later, Sohail’s sister, Maya, returns home after a long absence to find her beloved brother transformed. While Maya has stuck to her revolutionary ideals, Sohail has shunned his old life to become a charismatic religious leader. And when Sohail decides to send his son to a madrasa, the conflict between brother and sister comes to a devastating climax. Set in Bangladesh at a time when religious fundamentalism is on the rise, The Good Muslim is an epic story about faith, family, and the long shadow of war.

3. The Couple Next Door, by Shari Lapena (2016)
presented by JD.

It all started at a dinner party. . .
A domestic suspense debut about a young couple and their apparently friendly neighbors–a twisty, rollercoaster ride of lies, betrayal, and the secrets between husbands and wives. . .
Anne and Marco Conti seem to have it all–a loving relationship, a wonderful home, and their beautiful baby, Cora. But one night when they are at a dinner party next door, a terrible crime is committed. Suspicion immediately focuses on the parents. But the truth is a much more complicated story.
Inside the curtained house, an unsettling account of what actually happened unfolds. Detective Rasbach knows that the panicked couple is hiding something. Both Anne and Marco soon discover that the other is keeping secrets, secrets they’ve kept for years.
What follows is the nerve-racking unraveling of a family–a chilling tale of deception, duplicity, and unfaithfulness that will keep you breathless until the final shocking twist.

4. The New Neighbors, by Simon Lelic  (2018)
also presented by JD.

The Girl Before meets The Couple Next Door in a Hitchcockian thriller about a couple who moves into their dream neighborhood only to discover nothing is as it seems…
The perfect couple. The perfect house. The perfect crime.
Londoners Jack and Syd found their dream home: lots of space, a great location, and a friendly owner who wanted a young couple to have it.
Everything is exactly what they hoped for when they move in—except Jack makes a disturbing discovery in the attic, and Syd begins to wonder about the girl next door. And they each keep the other in the dark.
A mistake.
Because someone has just been killed outside their back door, and now the police are watching them.
This is their chance to prove they’re innocent—or to get away with murder.
Whose story do you believe?

Plainsong5.  Plainsong, (Plainsong #1) by Kent Haruf  (1999)
presented by P.

A heartstrong story of family and romance, tribulation and tenacity, set on the High Plains east of Denver.
In the small town of Holt, Colorado, a high school teacher is confronted with raising his two boys alone after their mother retreats first to the bedroom, then altogether. A teenage girl—her father long since disappeared, her mother unwilling to have her in the house—is pregnant, alone herself, with nowhere to go. And out in the country, two brothers, elderly bachelors, work the family homestead, the only world they’ve ever known.
From these unsettled lives emerges a vision of life, and of the town and landscape that bind them together—their fates somehow overcoming the powerful circumstances of place and station, their confusion, curiosity, dignity and humor intact and resonant. As the milieu widens to embrace fully four generations, Kent Haruf displays an emotional and aesthetic authority to rival the past masters of a classic American tradition.
Utterly true to the rhythms and patterns of life, Plainsong is a novel to care about, believe in, and learn from.

My own review is here

6. Boy, Snow, Bird, by Helen Oyeyemi  (2013)
presented by JM

BOY Novak turns twenty and decides to try for a brand-new life. Flax Hill, Massachusetts, isn’t exactly a welcoming town, but it does have the virtue of being the last stop on the bus route she took from New York. Flax Hill is also the hometown of Arturo Whitman –- craftsman, widower, and father of Snow. SNOW is mild-mannered, radiant and deeply cherished –- exactly the sort of little girl Boy never was, and Boy is utterly beguiled by her. If Snow displays a certain inscrutability at times, that’s simply a characteristic she shares with her father, harmless until Boy gives birth to Snow’s sister, Bird. When BIRD is born Boy is forced to re-evaluate the image Arturo’s family have presented to her, and Boy, Snow and Bird are broken apart. Sparkling with wit and vibrancy, Boy, Snow, Bird is a deeply moving novel about three women and the strange connection between them. It confirms Helen Oyeyemi’s place as one of the most original and dynamic literary voices of her generation.

7. From Sand and Ash, by Amy Harmon (2016)
presented by S.

Italy, 1943—Germany occupies much of the country, placing the Jewish population in grave danger during World War II.
As children, Eva Rosselli and Angelo Bianco were raised like family but divided by circumstance and religion. As the years go by, the two find themselves falling in love. But the church calls to Angelo and, despite his deep feelings for Eva, he chooses the priesthood.
Now, more than a decade later, Angelo is a Catholic priest and Eva is a woman with nowhere to turn. With the Gestapo closing in, Angelo hides Eva within the walls of a convent, where Eva discovers she is just one of many Jews being sheltered by the Catholic Church.
But Eva can’t quietly hide, waiting for deliverance, while Angelo risks everything to keep her safe. With the world at war and so many in need, Angelo and Eva face trial after trial, choice after agonizing choice, until fate and fortune finally collide, leaving them with the most difficult decision of all.

Hear our Defeats8. Hear Our Defeats, by Laurent Gaudé  (Jan 2019)
presented by me

Timely and provocative, Hear Our Defeats is a novel about the battles that define us. The battles lost, won, and those still being fought.
A French intelligence officer, Assem, is tasked with tracking down a former member of the U.S. Special Forces suspected of drug trafficking during the War in Afghanistan. En route to Beirut he shares a night with Miriam, an Iraqi archaeologist, who is in a race against time to save ancient artifacts across the Middle East from the destruction wreaked by ISIS.

Woven into these two forceful, gripping storylines are stylish meditations on humankind’s bellicose history: Hannibal’s failed march on Rome and the burning of his fleet on the waters of the Mediterranean; Grant’s pursuit of the Confederates into rural Virginia; Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse; and Emperor Haile Selassie’s swift retreat from Ethiopia. All turning points in world history, each showing a different facet of how nations and individuals face defeat.
Gaudé writes with a riveting immediacy, seamlessly taking the reader across the battlefields of our past to reflect upon the implications of conflicts being waged today.

My own review is here

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 HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THOSE?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

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Six degrees of separation: The French and Love

#6Degrees

Six degrees of separation:
The French and Love

Using my own rules for this fun meme hosted by Kate at Booksaremyfavouriteandbest (see there the origin of the meme and how it works – posted the first Saturday of every month), I started with a title containing the word French and ended up with Love!
This shouldn’t surprise you, lol.

Here are my own quirky rules:

1, Use your list of books on Goodreads
2. Take the first word of the title offered and find another title with that word in it
3. Then use the first word of THAT title to find your text title
4. Or the second if the title starts with the same word

NB: I goofed, I didn’t realize the book to start with this month was Fight Club!!
BUT we are in February after all, so nice to land on love!

After the covers, you can find the links to my reviews or to the title on Goodreads:

  thefrenchlieutenant27swoman Are We French Yet

  when you are engulfed in flames  

  The Love Song of Miss Queenie Love and invention

1. The French Lieutenant’s Woman = I confess I have never read it! And I don’t even remember if I ever watched the movie.
Convince me: why should I read and/or watch it?

2. Are We French Yet? = Nice collections of funny ad culturally aware vignettes highlighting how life can be enriched by being familiar with two cultures. My full review will be live on 2/6

3. When You Are Engulfed in Flames = this is not my favorite by Sedaris, though it’s very good. A collection of very funny essays. My favorite books by him are Me Talk Pretty One day, on learning the French language; and Holidays on Ice, super hilarious essays on Christmas. You HAVE to listen to Sedaris narrate his own audiobook

4. Miss Me When I’m Gone = this one is on my TBR, because I really enjoyed another book by the author: The Broken Teaglass

5. The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy = Within a contemplative atmosphere rich in descriptions of places and people, past and present, The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy offers a beautiful lesson in simple happiness. A great voice in literary fiction I am ready to listen to again.

6. Love and Invention = A beautiful hymn to creativity, to the courage to be different, to be oneself while connecting with others. Set in France!

***

Visit other chains here
using the book assigned for this month!
My mistake

***

HAVE YOU READ AND ENJOYED ANY OF THESE BOOKS?
HAVE YOU PLAYED
SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION
THIS MONTH?

Bout of Books 24: Day 5 recap

boutofbooks 24

#boutofbooks
#bob24igphoto

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda Shofner and Kelly Rubidoux Apple. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, January 7th and runs through Sunday, January 13th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 24 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books team

BOUT OF BOOKS 24
DAY 5 RECAP

Not sure why, but this was another rather slow day.

Here is what I read on Day 5:

  1. Don Quixote, by Cervantes = 48 pages
  2. The Plotters, by Un-Su Kim = 1 page!
  3. Prayers by the Lake, by Nikolaj Velimirovic = 12 pages
  4. Audiobook [15 minutes]: The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins = equivalent to 6 pages

Total for Day 5:  67
TOTAL so far: 503/805

And I participated in the Instagram challenge of the day, and the like this/try that challenge

Be sure to enter my giveaway

Check my Bout of Books 24 ultimate goal

SCHEDULE

Challenges

**This is the overall list for the challenges offered during Bout of Books 24. Make sure you check the blog each day of the read-a-thon for instructions and details on how to complete the daily challenges**

Monday 1/7
Introduce yourself #insixwords

Tuesday 1/8
Character dinner party

Wednesday 1/9
Six degrees of separation – based on an idea I submitted

Thursday 1/10
Synopsis rewrite

Friday 1/11
If this, then that

Saturday 1/12
Dream cast

Sunday 1/13
Stretch goal

Twitter Chats
(chats last approximately one hour)
TZC = Time Zone Conversion

Monday: 8pm CST (TZC)
Saturday: 10am CST (TZC)

BOUT OF BOOKS 24
DAY 4 RECAP

Yesterday was an exhausting day, with a very long and difficult article to translate, among other things. Plus, I had a conference call I absolutely needed to attend for my Church, and that was in the evening on my usual reading time.
Yes, one of my jobs is now to translate daily articles related to worldwide Orthodox news. And now, I’m thrilled to be translating from French to English, instead of the usual way round. Which means, you can now read my work, if you are interested in what’s going on in the world. Obviously, my English is not perfect, but I hope it is getting more and more acceptable.
So the reading result for the day is quite pathetic, and it’s putting my total below my expected average for this week.

Here is what I read on Day 4:

  1. Berlin AlexanderPlatz, by Alfred Döblin = 20 pages
  2. Don Quixote, by Cervantes = 11 pages
  3. The Plotters, by Un-Su Kim = 13 pages
  4. Audiobook [23 minutes]: The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins = equivalent to 7 pages

Total for Day 4:  51
TOTAL so far: 436/805

And I participated in the Instagram challenge of the day

 

BOUT OF BOOKS 24
DAY 3 RECAP

Here is what I read on Day 3:

  1. Are We French Yet?, by Keith Van Sickle = 74 pages – FINISHED
  2. Hear Our Defeats, by Laurent Gaudé = 5 pages – FINISHED
  3. Berlin AlexanderPlatz, by Alfred Döblin = 7 pages
  4. Prayers by the Lake, by Nikolaj Velimirovic = 12 pages
  5. The Plotters, by Un-Su Kim = 6 pages
  6. Audiobook [24 minutes]: The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins = equivalent to 11 pages

Total for Day 3: 115
TOTAL so far: 385/805

The challenge was based on an idea I submitted, so here is what I did. I’ll be visiting blogs today to see what YOU did with it.
And I participated in the Instagram challenge of the day

BOUT OF BOOKS 24
DAY 2 RECAP

Here is what I read on Day 2:

  1. Are We French Yet?, by Keith Van Sickle = 43 pages
  2. Hear Our Defeats, by Laurent Gaudé = 55 pages
  3. Berlin AlexanderPlatz, by Alfred Döblin = 14 pages
  4. Don Quixote, by Cervantes = 6 pages
  5. Prayers by the Lake, by Nikolaj Velimirovic = 11 pages
  6. Audiobook [36 minutes]: The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins = equivalent to 12 pages

Total for Day 2: 141
TOTAL so far: 270/805

And I participated in the Instagram challenge of the day

BOUT OF BOOKS 24
DAY 1 RECAP

Yesterday, January 7, was the big day to celebrate Christ’s Nativity for me. I’m an Orthodox Christian, and my Church follows the Julian calendar, which runs 13 late compare to the Gregorian (civil) calendar. So December 25 + 13 days = January 7.
It’s actually nice to be far from the crazy commercial stuff surrounding the Christmas frenzy and be able to focus only on the essential.
After the Church celebration, we had a very simple meal at home and time with friends.
But in the evening, I was able to have regular reading time.

So here is what I read on Day 1:

  1. Are We French Yet?, by Keith Van Sickle = 56 pages
  2. Hear Our Defeats, by Laurent Gaudé = 46 pages
  3. Audiobook [1H07]: The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins = equivalent to 27 pages

TOTAL so far: 129/805

Because of the very special day, as explained above, I didn’t have time to participate in the challenge of the day, nor in the Twitter chat.
But I posted a giveaway!

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