The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #29

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#ccspin

The Classics Club
2020-2025

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

The Classics Spin #29

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #29, I got #11 which on my list was

The Man in the Queue

I love classic mysteries, and I have been recommended to read books by Josephine Tey (1896-1952) so many times that I’m thrilled by this choice.
And if all goes well, I can go on with this series Inspector Alan Grant – a total 6 books.

She published this first one, The Man in the Queue, in 1929, under the pseudonym Gordon Daviot.
I plan on reading it in April.

“Inspector Alan Grant searches for the identity of a man killed in the line at a theater and for the identity of the killer—whom no one saw.
A long line had formed for the standing-room-only section of the Woffington Theatre. London’s favorite musical comedy of the past two years was finishing its run at the end of the week. Suddenly, the line began to move, forming a wedge before the open doors as hopeful theatergoers nudged their way forward. But one man, his head sunk down upon his chest, slowly sank to his knees and then, still more slowly, keeled over on his face. Thinking he had fainted, a spectator moved to help, but recoiled in horror from what lay before him: the man in the queue had a small silver dagger neatly plunged into his back. With the wit and guile that have made Inspector Grant a favorite of mystery fans, the inspector sets about discovering just how a murder occurred among so many witnesses, none of whom saw a thing.”

About the Author:
Josephine Tey

Josephine Tey was a pseudonym of Elizabeth Mackintosh. Josephine was her mother’s first name and Tey the surname of an English Grandmother. As Josephine Tey, she wrote six mystery novels featuring Scotland Yard’s Inspector Alan Grant.

The first of these, The Man in the Queue (1929) was published under the pseudonym of Gordon Daviot , whose name also appears on the title page of another of her 1929 novels, Kif; An Unvarnished History. She also used the Daviot by-line for a biography of the 17th century cavalry leader John Graham, which was entitled Claverhouse (1937).

Mackintosh also wrote plays (both one act and full length), some of which were produced during her lifetime, under the pseudonym Gordon Daviot. The district of Daviot, near her home of Inverness in Scotland, was a location her family had vacationed. The name Gordon does not appear in either her family or her history.

Elizabeth Mackintosh came of age during World War I, attending Anstey Physical Training College in Birmingham, England during the years 1915 – 1918. Upon graduation, she became a physical training instructor for eight years. In 1926, her mother died and she returned home to Inverness to care for her invalid father. Busy with household duties, she turned to writing as a diversion, and was successful in creating a second career.

Alfred Hitchcock filmed one of her novels, A Shilling for Candles (1936) as Young and Innocent in 1937 and two other of her novels have been made into films, The Franchise Affair (1948), filmed in 1950, and ‘Brat Farrar’ (1949), filmed as Paranoiac in 1963. In addition, a number of her works have been dramatized for radio.

Her novel The Daughter of Time (1951) was voted the greatest mystery novel of all time by the Crime Writers’ Association in 1990.

Miss Mackintosh never married, and died at the age of 55, in London. A shy woman, she is reported to have been somewhat of a mystery even to her intimate friends. While her death seems to have been a surprise, there is some indication she may have known she was fatally ill for some time prior to her passing.

Have you read it, or any other novel by Josephine Tey?
What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

📚 📚 📚 

Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spins:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

On the Edge of the World  Sanshiro The Sleepwalkers

For Classics Spin, #21, I got # 5: On the Edge of the World, by Nikolai Leskov

For Classics Spin, #22, I got # 13: Sanshiro, by Natsume Soseki

For Classics Spin, #24, I got # 18: The Sleepwalkers, by Hermann Broch, which I didn’t take time to read!!

The Letter Killers Club History in English Words A Man Lay Dead

For Classics Spin, #25, I got # 14: The Letter Killers Club – which was way over my head.

For Classics Spin, #26, I got # 11: History in English Words, by Owen Barfield, a fascinating book, which I haven’t reviewed yet!!

For Classics Spin, #28, I got # 12: A Man Ly Dead, by Ngaio Marsh, alas a disappointing one.

 

 

 

📚 📚 📚 

HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT BOOK DID YOU GET FOR THIS SPIN?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

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The Classics Club: The Classics Spin #29

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2020-2025

The Classics Spin #29

Time for a new spin!

At your blog, before Sunday, March 20, create a post to list your choice of any twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

On Sunday March 20, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List by April 30, 2022.

Here are 20 titles I have selected from my 3rd list of 50 classics.
A lot of mysteries

1 Italo Calvino The Baron in the Trees
2 Marcel Allain Fantômas
3 Edmond Rostand Cyrano de Bergerac (1897) = reread
4 Machado de Assi Dom Casmurro (1899)
5 Robert Walser Jakob von Gunten (1909)
6 A. A. Milne The Red House Mystery (1922)
7 Edna Ferber* So Big (1924)
8 Freeman Wills Crofts Inspector French’s Greatest Case (1924)
9 Dorothy L. Sayers* Clouds of Witness (1926)
10 Stefan Zweig Confusion (1927)
11 Josephine Tey* The Man in the Queue (1929)
12 Eric Ambler Epitaph for a Spy (1938)
13 Cornell Woolrich The Bride Wore Black (1940)
14 various authors The Floating Admiral (1931)
15 Raymond Chandler The Big Sleep (1939)
16 Antal Szerb The Pendragon Legend (1934)
17 Jean Giono Le chant du monde (1934)
18 Rex Stout Fer-de-Lance (1934)
19 Daphne du Maurier* Jamaica Inn (1935)
20 Sinclair Lewis It Can’t Happen Here (1935)

COME BACK ON MONDAY 21
TO SEE WHICH BOOK I HAVE TO READ SOON.
HOW MANY HAVE YOU READ?
WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?

MY FULL LIST IS HERE

The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #28

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub
#ccspin

The Classics Club
2020-2025

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

The Classics Spin #28

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #28, I got #12, which on my list was

A Man Lay Dead

I tend to really like classic mysteries, and I have never read anything by Dame Ngaio Marsh (1895-1982), a New Zealand crime writer, so this is perfect!
I plan on reading it in November.

A Man Lay Dead (Roderick Alleyn #1) was published in 1934, this was her first novel.

“At Sir Hubert Handesley’s country house party, five guests have gathered for the uproarious parlor game of “Murder.” Yet no one is laughing when the lights come up on an actual corpse, the good-looking and mysterious Charles Rankin. Scotland Yard’s Inspector Roderick Alleyn arrives to find a complete collection of alibis, a missing butler, and an intricate puzzle of betrayal and sedition in the search for the key player in this deadly game.”

About the Author:
Ngaio MarshDame Ngaio (/ˈn/) Marsh, born Edith Ngaio Marsh, was a New Zealand crime writer and theatre director. There is some uncertainty over her birth date as her father neglected to register her birth until 1900, but she was born in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand.
Of all the “Great Ladies” of the English mystery’s golden age, including Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Dorothy L. Sayers, Ngaio Marsh alone survived to publish in the 1980s. Over a fifty-year span, from 1932 to 1982, Marsh wrote thirty-two classic English detective novels, which gained international acclaim. She did not always see herself as a writer, but first planned a career as a painter.
Marsh’s first novel, A MAN LAY DEAD (1934), which she wrote in London in 1931-32, introduced the detective Inspector Roderick Alleyn: a combination of Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey and a realistically depicted police official at work. Throughout the 1930s Marsh painted occasionally, wrote plays for local repertory societies in New Zealand, and published detective novels. In 1937 Marsh went to England for a period. Before going back to her home country, she spent six months travelling about Europe.

All her novels feature British CID detective Roderick Alleyn. Several novels feature Marsh’s other loves, the theatre and painting. A number are set around theatrical productions (Enter a Murderer, Vintage Murder, Overture to Death, Opening Night, Death at the Dolphin, and Light Thickens), and two others are about actors off stage (Final Curtain and False Scent). Her short story “‘I Can Find My Way Out” is also set around a theatrical production and is the earlier “Jupiter case” referred to in Opening Night. Alleyn marries a painter, Agatha Troy, whom he meets during an investigation (Artists in Crime), and who features in several later novels. [Goodreads]

Have you read it, or any other novel by Ngaio Marsh?
What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

📚 📚 📚 

Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spins:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

On the Edge of the World  Sanshiro The Sleepwalkers

For Classics Spin, #21, I got # 5: On the Edge of the World, by Nikolai Leskov

For Classics Spin, #22, I got # 13: Sanshiro, by Natsume Soseki

For Classics Spin, #24, I got # 18: The Sleepwalkers, by Hermann Broch, which I didn’t take time to read!!

The Letter Killers Club History in English Words

For Classics Spin, #25, I got # 14: The Letter Killers Club – which was way over my head.

For Classics Spin, #26, I got # 11: History in English Words, by Owen Barfield, a fascinating book, which I haven’t reviewed yet!!

 

 

 

📚 📚 📚 

HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT BOOK DID YOU GET FOR THIS SPIN?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save