The Classics Club 2019-2024: 2nd list recap

classicsclub

#theclassicsclub

The Classics Club
September 7, 2019 – September 7, 2024

You read it right: I had five years to read my 2nd list of 50 titles for The Classics Club.
But I actually managed to read/listen to them between September 2019 and November 2020!
See my 2nd list here. As usual, 34 titles were added to my original list!
And my first list here.
Alas, I’m so so far behind as for reviews.

📚 Here is a little recap:

Besides Bible books, the oldest title was published in 1824:
The Masque of the Red Death, by Edgar Allan Poe
And the most recent in 1953:
Childhood’s End, by Arthur C. Clarke

📚 Genre:

  • 2 scifi
  • 3 nonfiction
  • 4 fiction
  • 15 Bible
  • 22 mysteries

Both scifi were super disappointing.
In nonfiction, my favorite was

Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes

In  fiction, I so loved

Parnassus on Wheels

In mystery, this one was a big revelation:

The Lodger

I read the first 9 Maigret mysteries by Georges Simenon.
I really liked the ambiance, as explained for instance in this post.

And I’m really thrilled by my current project or listening to all of Hercule Poirot, as the first story with him was published one hundred years ago.
I enjoy this experience as much I enjoyed listening to all of Sherlock Holmes in 2017. I am more and more discovering all the intricacies of the main character.
And Agatha Christie’s plots are so genially put together, with not two alike, even if several are the type of closed room mystery.

So far, I have listened to 8 and read 1, which is actually a play!
Most of these were narrated by the amazing Hugh Fraser. I did watch the BBc series, so it’s really neat to find his voice again. He is so so good at doing all kinds of different characters.
And a couple were with David Suchet, who’s really dedicated all his life to Hercule Poirot.

As I haven’t written any review of these, I’d like to share here something I have discovered, thanks to the audio format. It never struck me when I was reading them (I did read a few Hercule Poirot books in the past).
We all know Hercule is a francophone Belgian, and his English is not perfect.
When you read/hear him, you may notice some awkward phrases and think, well, he’s not a native English speaker and not think more about it.
But there’s actually more to the story. I realized that his mistakes are based on French constructions. The latest most obvious example I encountered is in Lord Edgware Dies. At one point, Hercule tells Captain Hastings, “You mock yourself at me.”
In French, the verb ‘to mock’ is indeed not a transitive verb, but a pronominal verb (se moquer de), so to say: you mock me, we do literally say “you mock yourself at me” (vous vous moquez de moi).
There are many similar examples like this in all the Hercule Poirot stories I have listened to so far, which shows that either Agatha Christie was fluent in French, or she did extensive research to make Hercule very real. Her family spent a year in France, that probably helped, though I don’t know how old she was then. I so need to read her biography!

📚 Format:

  • 18 print
  • 32 audio

📚 Authors:

  • 5 by a Japanese author
  • 6 by an American author
  • 10 by a French author

Club hashtags on Twitter:

DID YOU LIKE THE BOOKS HIGHLIGHTED 
IN THIS POST?

COME BACK TOMORROW
TO DISCOVER MY NEWEST LIST!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Nonfiction November 2020: Book Pairings

nonficnov2020

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule
#nonficnov

Book Pairings

hosted by Julz of Julz Reads

This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title.
It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!”
or just two titles that you think would go well together.
Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history
by reading a nonfiction version of the story.

Today, I’m offering you 3 novels paired with 3 nonfiction books I read this year

Click on the covers to get more details

BOOK PAIRING #1

BIRDS

Vesper Flights Migrations

Migrations:
VERDICT: Both beautiful and heart-wrenching. And of course, a must for all birders.
Franny, from Galway, Ireland, knows that it’s probably the last time the Arctic Terns are migrating, so she decided to follow and accompany them on their last journey.
She goes to Greenland, where the bird starts its migration, and manages to convince Captain Ennis Malone to accept her on his shipping boat The Saghani. His crew has had a hard time finding fish, also because of global warming and all we have done to our planet, but Franny is a scientist and knows that the Arctic Tern adjusts its route to where they can find fish to eat. So that should work, right?
Things get complicated…

BOOK PAIRING #2

MARIE-ANTOINETTE

 Marie Antoinette's World MARIE antoinette

Becoming Marie-Antoinette:
The book is excellent at describing the royal families and all the petty details of everyday life, from the rising to the preparation for the night;  at showing what it would have taken to become the queen of France, lots of advantages maybe, but also lots of sacrifices.

BOOK PAIRING #3

TEA

 The Book of Tea broken teaglass

The Broken Teaglass:
Take words, a job with words and dictionaries, and a good mystery, well, how could I resist that!
A neat, smart, very enjoyable and quick read.

HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THESE?
WOULD YOU HAVE ANOTHER
BOOK PAIRING RELATED TO BIRDS OR TEA?

Nonfiction November: My Year 2020 in Nonfiction

nonficnov2020

#NonficNov

Click on the logo to see the detailed schedule

As every year, a bunch of really cool bloggers are co-hosting Nonfiction November.

Here is the topic for Week 1 (Nov. 2-6):

YOUR YEAR IN NONFICTION

Hosted by JLeann of Shelf Aware
Take a look back at your year of nonfiction and reflect on the following questions:
What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?
Do you have a particular topic you’ve been attracted to more this year?
What nonfiction book have you recommended the most?
What are you hoping to get out of participating in Nonfiction November?

Here is the recap of the nonfiction I have read (the links will send you to my review when it’s posted).
So far, I have read or listened to 28 nonfiction, which is already 9% more than last year (I read 23 nonfiction in 2019).
And I plan to read at least 4 more before the end of the year.

Here are the titles:

Bible and religious books:

  1. The Book of Genesis
  2. The Book of Exodus
  3. The Book of Leviticus
  4. The Book of Numbers
  5. The Book of Deuteronomy
  6. he Book of Joshua
  7. The Book of Judges
  8. The Book of Ruth
  9. The First & Second Book of Samuel
  10. The First & Second Book of Kings
  11. The 1st & 2nd Book of Chronicles
  12. The Book of Nehemiah all the above are audio, for The Classics Club
  13. Theological Territories: a David Bentley Hart Digest, by David Bentley Hart- ebook
  14. On The Ecclesiastical Mystagogy, by Saint Maximus the Confessor
  15. The Church, the Litany, and the Soul of Man, by Saint Maximus the Confessor
  16. Le petit livre de la vie réussie, by Anselm Grün

About Thoreau:

  1. Civil Disobedience, by Henry David Thoreau – ebook, for The Classics Club
  2. Bob Pepperman Taylor, Lessons from Walden – ebook

About nature:

  1. La Panthère des neiges, by Sylvain Tesson – French audiobook
  2. Vesper Flights, by Helen McDonald – audiobook

About history:

  1. Berezina, by Sylvain Tesson – French audiobook
  2. Marie Antoinette’s World, by Will Bashor- ebook for France Book Tours

About Japan:

  1. The Book of Tea, by Kakuzo Okakura – for The Classics Club
  2. The Book of Ichigo Ichie, by Héctor Garcia

On contemporary issues:

  1. On Tyranny, by Timothy Snyder
  2. L’Humanité en péril, by Fred Vargas – French audiobook, on the urgent need to save our planet!

Graphic “novel” about books:

  1. I Will Judge You by Your Bookshelf, by Grant Snider

I also reviewed 21 books published by Rockridge Press, but I didn’t read these books from A to Z as I would read other books, so I didn’t count them in my statistics.

So really, this was a huge nonfiction year for me.
I’m very happy for the diversity of topics as well.
Besides, I’m glad I did a good dent in my project to listen to each book of the Bible, a nice way of revisiting it all.

***

What was your favorite nonfiction read of the year?

  La Panthère des neiges L'humanité en péril

I had to choose two.
If you click on the left cover, you can see its English edition.
The other one has not been translated

What nonfiction book
have you recommended the most?

Vesper Flights

Do you have a particular topic
you’ve been attracted to more this year?
Besides religious topics, not really

What are you hoping to get out
of participating in Nonfiction November?
As usual, to get acquainted with more nonfiction readers
and find good titles unknown to me.

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE NONFICTION THIS YEAR?

Save