Paris in July 2022: Day 5

Paris in July 2022 (Bigger Sunset)

Paris in July 2022
#ParisinJuly
Co-hosted by Readerbuzz and Thyme For Tea

Day 5

Sharing more on the 26 French books I have read so far this year.
Actually a lot of these I have listened to.

Click on the covers to read my full review,
or get more details on the books

Read in February-March:

Intuitio Gataca

Intuitio
This was an intriguing thriller on a fascinating topic: intuition.
A woman working for the FBI knows about this author (main character in the book) who seems to have an amazing intuition. So they hire him to try to identify a terrorist who’s been bombing towers all over the US, and also to try to identify the next target.
It’s based on real scientific data. In fact, Gounelle explains that he went through these tests, and they seem to work. And some police forces do use these techniques.
I liked the pace, and some great twists in the plot.

Gataca
The first chapters are VERY depressing, but then, it becomes so fascinating with Thilliez’ usual gift at inserting awesome and accurate science into his novels.
Here genetics and evolutionary paleontology. I learned so much, for instance on laterality. The parts about lactose intolerance were so informative.

Lean On Me Chez les Flamands

Lean on Me
VERDICT: Romance and social analysis of the impact of urban life on human nature. An exquisite French mix.

Chez les Flamands
As usual, Simenon is fabulous at creating and describing an ambiance. The city seems both half asleep and violent, with the cold rain and the raging waters of the Meuse, flooding the area.
What is special to this novel, is the description of the animosity between French and Flemish people in the same city.

  Le Fou de Bergerac L'Aiguille creuse

Le Fou de Bergerac
Yes, you are going to see a bunch of Maigret books here, as I have been reading them in order with one of my French students.
This was an unusual one. For the first time in the series, there was a lot of humor, in Maigret’s situation and habits, and in the descriptions of locals.
And for once, we really get to know Madame Maigret.

L’Aiguille creuse
The style does betray its age (the book was published in 1909), but still, I enjoyed the plot, the enigma, and the characters – especially of course the many disguises adopted by Lupin; but also Herlock Sholmès!
It was neat to see also how we get closer and closer to discover the real meaning of the title.

HAVE YOU READ THESE BOOKS?
OR BOOKS BY THESE AUTHORS?

13 thoughts on “Paris in July 2022: Day 5

  1. I tried reading the original Lupin book after watching the recent TV treatment (with the character completely changed & modified) — but I found it very dated and not at all fun to read. The first streaming TV version was great, the other not so much.

    You do make me want to read more Simenon, though I think I that long ago, I read the ones you reviewed.

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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  2. From these, I’m tempted first of all by Chez les Flamands. The kind of animosity you mention is always fascinating to observe: but not I guess, to live with. And people – not just you – keep pushing Maigret at me. There’s a message here …

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  3. “Chez les Flamands” sounds interesting. After all, I have lived in Belgium, one of my sons lives there now and I have many friends in both parts of the country. Plus, Brussels is my absolute favourite city. I will have to read that.

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  4. I was hoping you had read Lean on Me, and I’m happy to see how much you enjoyed it. This morning, as I was cleaning off shelves in preparation for new flooring, I found a copy of Lean on Me. I hope to read it this month.

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  5. Maigret is always good. I used to look at the original Lupin tv-series which I loved. I have not read any of the books.

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  6. Pingback: Sunday Post #61 – 7/10/2022 | Words And Peace

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