The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #26

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The Classics Club
2020-2025

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

The Classics Spin #26

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

For this Classics spin #26, I got #11, which on my list was

History in English Words

I just finished reading George Saunders’ fantastic literary criticism book (A Swim in a Pond in the Rain) based on his class on Russian short stories, so I am really thrilled with this book that will help me linger more on words and the art of writing.

Owen Barfield‘s original and thought-provoking works over three-quarters of a century made him a legendary cult figure. History in English Words is his classic historical excursion through the English language. It was originally published in 1926.

This popular book provides a brief, brilliant history of those who have spoken the Indo-European tongues. It is illustrated throughout by current English words—whose derivation from other languages, whose history in use and changes of meaning—record and unlock the larger history.

About the Author:
Owen Barfield (1898-1997), British philosopher and critic, has been called the “First and Last Inkling” because of his influential and enduring role in the group known as the Oxford Inklings, which included C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams.
It was Barfield who first advanced the ideas about language, myth, and belief that became identified with the thought and art of the Inklings.
He is the author of numerous books, including Poetic DictionRomanticism Comes of AgeUnancestoral VoiceHistory, Guilt, and Habit; and Worlds Apart, as well as works of fiction and poetry. His history of the evolution of human consciousness, Saving the Appearances: A Study in Idolatry, achieved a place in the list of the “100 Best Spiritual Books of the Century.””

Have you read it? What did you think?

It’s never too late to challenge yourself to (re)discover the classics and connect and have fun with other Classics lovers. See here what this is all about.

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Here is what I got for the previous Classics Spins:

A wizard of Earthsea Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Arsene Lupin

For Classics Spin #14, I got #1: A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin
For Classics Spin, #15, I got #12: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
by Philip K. Dick
For Classics Spin, #16, I got #4: Arsène Lupin, by Maurice Leblanc

The Face of Another A Moveable Feast The Dream of the Red Chamber

For Classics Spin, #17, I got #3: The Face of Another, by Kobo Abe (not yet reviewed!!)

For Classics Spin, #19, I got #1: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

For Classics Spin, #20, I got # 19: The Dream of the Red Chamber
by Cao Xueqin

On the Edge of the World  Sanshiro The Sleepwalkers

For Classics Spin, #21, I got # 5: On the Edge of the World, by Nikolai Leskov

For Classics Spin, #22, I got # 13: Sanshiro, by Natsume Soseki

For Classics Spin, #24, I got # 18: The Sleepwalkers, by Hermann Broch, which I didn’t take time to read!!

The Letter Killers Club

For Classics Spin, #25, I got # 14: The Letter Killers Club – which was way over my head.

 

 

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HAVE YOU READ THIS BOOK?
WHAT DID YOU THINK?

IF YOU ARE MEMBER OF THE CLASSICS CLUB,
WHAT BOOK DID YOU GET FOR THIS SPIN?

MY FULL CLASSICS CLUB LIST IS HERE

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22 thoughts on “The Classics Club: what I got for The Classics Spin #26

  1. Wonderful, so happy you got this one! I am really regretting that I left behind my copy when I moved. I will probably end up buying another copy at some point.

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  2. Looks like an interesting book. I got “The Master and Margarita” by Mikhail Bulgakov. I love Russian literature, so I’m very exceited.

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  3. Linguistics is a field that has always interested me. Years ago, I took some classes in French, which were based on the books by Michel Thomas. He always started his chapters/ lectures with a brief history of how some of the English words were derived from French — I don’t know how, but it really helped to remember the rules after that! I hope this book turns out well!

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    • Yes, the Michel Thomas method is cool. I use it with one of my students, it works well. It makes sense that if you know better the origin of a word or expression you would remember it better, because now you know it with its background

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: The top 9 books to read in May 2021 | Words And Peace

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