TOP 5 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 06/16-17

TOP 5 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 

06/16-17/2012

Here are the latest titles added to my Goodreads TBR,
I suggest them as the top 5 books for your week-end.

FICTION

Barney’s Version

“In 1944, I was aware of three youth groups committed to the compelling idea of an independent Jewish state: Hashomer Hatza’ir (The Young Guard), Young Judaea, and Habonim (The Builders).

Hashomer Hatza’ir was resolutely Marxist. According to intriguing reports I had heard, it was the custom, on their kibbutzim already established in Palestine, for boys and girls under the age of eighteen to shower together. Hashomer Hatza’ir members in Montreal included a boy I shall call Shloime Schneiderman, a high-school classmate of mine. In 1944, when we were still in eighth grade, Schloime enjoyed a brief celebrity after his photo appeared on the front page of the Montreal Herald. Following a two-cent rise in the price of chocolate bars, he had been a leader in a demonstration, holding high a placard that read: down with the 7cents chocolate bar. Hashomer Hatza’ir members wore uniforms at their meetings: blue shirts and neckerchiefs. “They had real court martials,” wrote Marion Magid in a memoir about her days in Habonim in the Bronx in the early fifties, “group analysis, the girls were not allowed to wear lipstick.” Whereas, in my experience, the sweetly scented girls who belonged to Young Judaea favored pearls and cashmere twinsets. They lived on leafy streets in the suburb of Outremont, in detached cottages that had heated towel racks, basement playrooms, and a plaque hanging on the wall behind the wet bar testifying to the number of trees their parents had paid to have planted in Eretz Yisrael, the land of Israel.

I joined Habonim — the youth group of a Zionist political party, rooted in socialist doctrine — shortly after my bar mitzvah, during my first year at Baron Byng High School. I had been recruited by a Room 41 classmate whom I shall call Jerry Greenfeld…”

Hardcover, 288 pages
Published September 25th 1997 by Chatto and Windus(first published September 16th 1997)
ISBN0701162724 (ISBN13: 9780701162726)
literary awards

Antigonick

by Anne Carson, Bianca Stone (Illustrator)
An illustrated new translation of Sophokles’ Antigone.

With text blocks hand-inked on the page by Anne Carson and her collaborator Robert Currie, Antigonick features translucent vellum pages with stunning drawings by Bianca Stone that overlay the text.

Anne Carson has published translations of the ancient Greek poets Sappho, Simonides, Aiskhylos, Sophokles and Euripides. Antigonick is her first attempt at making translation into a combined visual and textual experience. Sophokles’ luminous and disturbing tragedy is here given an entirely fresh language and presentation. Thoroughly delightful.

Hardcover, 180 pages
Published May 10th 2012 by New Directions(first published April 24th 2012)
ISBN0811219577 (ISBN13: 9780811219570)

A Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar

It is 1923. Evangeline (Eva) English and her sister Lizzie are missionaries heading for the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar. Though Lizzie is on fire with her religious calling, Eva’s motives are not quite as noble, but with her green bicycle and a commission from a publisher to write A Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar, she is ready for adventure.
In present day London, a young woman, Frieda, returns from a long trip abroad to find a man sleeping outside her front door. She gives him a blanket and a pillow, and in the morning finds the bedding neatly folded and an exquisite drawing of a bird with a long feathery tail, some delicate Arabic writing, and a boat made out of a flock of seagulls on her wall. Tayeb, in flight from his Yemeni homeland, befriends Frieda and, when she learns she has inherited the contents of an apartment belonging to a dead woman she has never heard of, they embark on an unexpected journey together.
A Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar explores the fault lines that appear when traditions from different parts of an increasingly globalized world crash into one other. Beautifully written, and peopled by a cast of unforgettable characters, the novel interweaves the stories of Frieda and Eva, gradually revealing the links between them and the ways in which they each challenge and negotiate the restrictions of their societies as they make their hard-won way toward home. A Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar marks the debut of a wonderfully talented new writer.
Hardcover, 384 pages
Published June 4th 2012 by Bloomsbury USA(first published May 22nd 2012)
ISBN1608198111 (ISBN13: 9781608198115)
NON-FICTION

Why We Get Sick: The New Science Of Darwinian Medicine

The answers are in this groundbreaking book by two founders of the emerging science of Darwinian medicine, who deftly synthesize the latest research on disorders ranging from allergies to Alzheimer’s and from cancer to Huntington’s chorea. Why We Get Sick compels readers to reexamine the age-old attitudes toward sickness. Line drawings.
Paperback, 304 pages
Published January 30th 1996 by Vintage(first published January 31st 1994)
ISBN0679746749 (ISBN13: 9780679746744)

The Art of Changing the Brain: Enriching the Practice of Teaching by Exploring the Biology of Learning

Neuroscience tells us that the products of the mind — thought, emotions, artistic creation — are the result of the interactions of the biological brain with our senses and the physical world: in short, that thinking and learning are the products of a biological process.This realization, that learning actually alters the brain by changing the number and strength of synapses, offers a powerful foundation for rethinking teaching practice and one’s philosophy of teaching.James Zull invites teachers in higher education or any other setting to accompany him in his exploration of what scientists can tell us about the brain and to discover how this knowledge can influence the practice of teaching. He describes the brain in clear non-technical language and an engaging conversational tone, highlighting its functions and parts and how they interact, and always relating them to the real world of the classroom and his own evolution as a teacher. “The Art of Changing the Brain” is grounded in the practicalities and challenges of creating effective opportunities for deep and lasting learning, and of dealing with students as unique learners.
Hardcover, 263 pages
Published by Stylus Publishing (VA)
ISBN1579220533 (ISBN13: 9781579220532)
HAVE YOU READ ANY OF THOSE?
HAVE YOU CHOSEN WHAT YOU WILL READ THIS WEEK-END?
CLICK HERE TO FIND MORE CHOICE

4 thoughts on “TOP 5 BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 06/16-17

  1. One of my favorite “brain books” is Dr. Norman Doidge’s The Brain that Changes Itself, so I’m definitely adding The Art of Changing the Brain to my list. I’ve read another review (positive) of The Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar, and it does sound good.

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