#76 review: Wonderstruck

Wonderstruck

by

Brian SELZNICK

634 pages

Graphic novel

Published in September 2011 by Scholastic Press

MY THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS BOOK

I read The Invention of Hugo Cabret in one sitting, and was so fascinated both by the story and the gorgeous pencil illustrations, that I jumped on the newest books by the same author.

I found in it the same format and the same quality of illustrations. The story was good too, though easier to figure out, and I didn’t got from it the same sense of wonder as I had in his first novel, but that could just be that I no longer had the surprise of discovering a new style of book, in between fiction and graphic novel.

If you need a quick relaxing book, with some beauty in it, this is for you.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT

Set fifty years apart, two independent stories—Ben’s told in words and Rose’s in pictures—weave back and forth with mesmerizing symmetry. How they unfold and ultimately intertwine will surprise you, challenge you, and leave you breathless with wonder.
Ever since his mom died, Ben feels lost. At home with her father, Rose feels alone. He is searching for someone, but he is not sure who. She is searching for something, but she is not sure what.
When Ben finds a mysterious clue hidden in his mom’s room, When a tempting opportunity presents itself to Rose. Both children risk everything to find what’s missing.
With over 460 pages of original drawings and playing with the form he invented in his trailblazing debut novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick once again sails into uncharted territory and takes readers on an awe-inspiring journey. Rich, complex, affecting and beautiful, Wonderstruck is a stunning achievement from a uniquely gifted artist and visionary. [Goodreads]

QUOTATION

Ben wished the world was organized by the Dewey Decimal system. That way you’d be able to find whatever you were looking for, like the meaning of your dream, or your dad.
pp.440-441


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Hello there. My name is Brian Selznick and I’m the author and illustrator of The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I was born in 1966 in New Jersey. I have a sister who is a teacher, a brother who is a brain surgeon, and five nephews and one niece. I studied at The Rhode Island School of Design and after I graduated from college I worked at Eeyore’s Books for Children in New York City. I learned all about children’s books from my boss Steve Geck who is now an editor of children’s books at Greenwillow. While I was at Eeyore’s I also painted the windows for holidays and book events.

My first book, The Houdini Box, which I both wrote and illustrated, was published in 1991 while I was still working at the bookstore. Since then, I have illustrated many books for children, including Frindle by Andrew Clements, The Doll People by Ann Martin and Laura Godwin, Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Pam Muñoz Ryan and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which received a 2001 Caldecott Honor.

I have also written a few other books myself, including The Boy of a Thousand Faces, but The Invention of Hugo Cabret is by far the longest and most involved book I’ve ever worked on.

I live in Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California

BOOK TRAILER WITH AUTHOR

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