GOOD BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 01-02/10

GOOD BOOKS FOR YOUR WEEK-END 

10/01-02/2011

I will soon publish my September recap where there are tons of good books, but here is for your week-end. And if you are doing the read-a-thon, you may get some great ideas here below, with synopsis found on Goodreads, and a review by another blogger – if you click on the titles:

FICTION

The Uncommon Reader, by Alan Bennett (2007)
A deliciously funny novella that celebrates the pleasure of reading. When the Queen in pursuit of her wandering corgis stumbles upon a mobile library  she feels duty bound to borrow a book. Aided by Norman, a young man from the palace kitchen who frequents the library, Bennett describes the Queen’s transformation as she discovers the liberating pleasures of the written word. With the poignant and mischievous wit of The History Boys, England’s best loved author revels in the power of literature to change even the most uncommon reader’s life.

Mistress of the Art of Death, by Ariana Franklin    (2007)
A chilling, mesmerizing novel that combines the best of modern forensic thrillers with the detail and drama of historical fiction.

Awaken, by Katie Kacvinsky    (May 2011)
Maddie lives in a world where everything is done on the computer. Whether it’s to go to school or on a date, people don’t venture out of their home. There’s really no need. For the most part, Maddie’s okay with the solitary, digital life—until she meets Justin. Justin likes being with people. He enjoys the physical closeness of face-to-face interactions. People aren’t meant to be alone, he tells her.
Suddenly, Maddie feels something awakening inside her—a feeling that maybe there is a different, better way to live. But with society and her parents telling her otherwise, Maddie is going to have to learn to stand up for herself if she wants to change the path her life is taking.
In this not-so-brave new world, two young people struggle to carve out their own space
NON-FICTION

The Beekeeper’s Lament, by Hannah Nordaus    (June 2011)
The honey bee is a willing conscript, a working wonder, an unseen and crucial link in America’s agricultural industry. But never before has its survival been so unclear—and the future of our food supply so acutely challenged.
Enter beekeeper John Miller, who trucks his hives around the country, bringing millions of bees to farmers otherwise bereft of natural pollinators. Even as the mysterious and deadly epidemic known as Colony Collapse Disorder devastates bee populations across the globe, Miller forges ahead with the determination and wry humor of a true homespun hero. The Beekeeper’s Lament tells his story and that of his bees, making for a complex, moving, and unforgettable portrait of man in the new natural world.

The Song of Achilles, by Madeline Miller    (Septemver 2011)
Profoundly moving and breathtakingly original, this rendering of the epic Trojan War is a dazzling feat of the imagination, a devastating love story, and an almighty battle between gods and kings, peace and glory, immortal fame and the human heart.

Reading Like a Writer, by Francine Prose    (2007)
In her entertaining and edifying New York Times bestseller, acclaimed author Francine Prose invites you to sit by her side and take a guided tour of the tools and the tricks of the masters and discover why their work has endured. Written with passion, humor, and wisdom, Reading Like a Writer will inspire readers to return to literature with a fresh eye and an eager heart—to take pleasure in the long and magnificent sentences of Philip Roth and the breathtaking paragraphs of Isaac Babel; to look to John Le Carré for a lesson in how to advance plot through dialogue, and to Flannery O’Connor for the cunning use of the telling detail. And, most importantly, she cautions readers to slow down and pay attention to words, the raw material out of which all literature is crafted.

ANY GOOD TITLES YOU CAME UPON THIS PAST WEEK?

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