Read in January 2011

Is it because of the cold and snow that I read so much this past month?

Partly yes, as we usually do a lot of hiking in the week-end, and the cold did not invite me to do so. But otherwise, the only time I really read is after dinner, whatever the season or the weather. Seriously, I do not have time during the day for reading otherwise.

I guess the main reason is the excitement of a new year, of doing more serious book blogging, of joining Reading Challenges, and trying to outdo myself.

So the result is 9 books read. So far, I haven’t finished any audiobook in 2011, but it’s not too surprising, as I’m listening to a very long one, The CanterburyTales, and that I have not had much time to paint – and I mostly listen to audiobooks when I paint or do house chores.

Here are the 9 books I read:

1) The Crying of Lot 49, by Thomas Pynchon – 152 p.
2) The Night Bookmobile,  by Audrey Niffenegger – 40 p. (GN)
3) Tevye the Dairyman and Motl the Cantor’s Son, by Sholem Aleichem – 374 p.
4) The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon, by David Grann – 277 p.
5) Introducing Benedict’s Rule, by Michael Casey and David Tomlins – 250 p.
6) Graphic Classics Series: Mark Twain – 141 p. (GN)
7) The Spy Who Came In From the Cold, by John Le Carré – 256p.
8) The Edible Woman, by Margaret Atwood – 281 p.
9) The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, by Walter Mosley – 277 p.

With a total of 2048 pages.
That’s an average of 227.55/book,
and of 66.06 pages/day.
Not bad to begin the year! It is actually the best average since at least 2001.

I also started and abandoned Running with Scissors, by Augusten Burroughs. The book description says “by turns horrifying and hilarious.” It was too much horrifying for me, and I didn’t find it that hilarious.

Of these 9 books read, 2 only were non-fiction:

The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon, by David Grann
Introducing Benedict’s Rule, by Michael Casey and David Tomlins

2 were Graphic Novels:

The Night Bookmobile,  by Audrey Niffenegger
Graphic Classics Series: Mark Twain

My favorite non-fiction book this month was The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon.


My favorite fiction book this month was The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


I have actually focused on my main Reading Challenges. Here is where I am at [the + shows the books I have read]:

What’s in a name. 6 books : http://whatsinaname4.blogspot.com/
– Number: The Crying Of Lot 49 +
– Movement: The Spy Who came in from the cold +
– Life Stage: The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey +
– Gem: Cutting For Stone
– Size: The Great Railway Bazaar, by Paul Theroux
– Evil: Strong As Death

My own challenge: Books Published in The First Years of My Life. Kid level : 5 books https://wordsandpeace.wordpress.com/2010/12/06/books-published-in-the-first-years-of-my-life-challenge-2011/
– 1966: The Crying Of Lot 49 +
– 1967: Company for Henry, by Wodehouse
– 1968: Do Butlers Burgle Bankers, by Wodehouse + [see upcoming review]
– 1969: Edible Woman +
– 1970: Bluest Eye

This month, I have also inaugurated the weekly post Good books for your week-end, which allows me to give each week small portions of my already-disastrously-long new TBR.

I have also posted a few excerpts of non-fiction I have been reading. I guess that makes for what I used to do: copy by hand all the passages I love in books I would be reading, which explain the facts that I have dozens of notebooks filled with excerpts upon excerpts.

I have made some modifications on this blog: the left menu is now completely available, even if you are into one specific post, and I have a list of books I am currently reading. I tried to put pictures of the cover there instead, but my blog seems to only allow 2 pictures.

Today, blizzard day in Chicagoland, my place of work was closed. So I was planning to try a Read-a-thon!

Well, I had forgotten that I had to give 2 online French classes this morning; then we were quite busy with the 17 inches of snow. After which I made some nice Chinese soup to warm us up! Then my muscles asked for a nap! And I ended up doing some translation jobs. SO, no read-a-thon possible, BUT yesterday night I managed to read Do Butlers Burgle Bankers, by Wodehouse in one sitting yesterday night – ok, don’t ask at what time I went to bed, AND I just finished listening The Canterbury Tales today, as, oh yes I was going to forget, I finsihed another rockpainting commission.

Conclusion: I kind of LIKE blizzards, as long as there’s enough snow to keep us in the house.

WHAT DID YOU READ THIS PAST MONTH?

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1 thought on “Read in January 2011

  1. Ah, c’est donc avec la neige que tu as pellé (comme disent les québécois) que tu as fait la “petite” oeuvre d’art hivernal mise en 1° image de ce billet ? Beau travail, qui méritait une bonne soupe réconfortante ! LOL
    (ça me fait penser à un hôtel tout en glace vers Québec que je visitai il y a 4 ans).

    Ah, so, with the snow you shoveled (as they say in Quebec) you made the “little” art winter set in 1 ° photo of this post? Good work, which deserved a comforting soup! LOL

    Like

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